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Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

Um... not really no.

A woman's capacity to give birth to a healthy child without medical assistance does not negate the benefit of a healthy child. Just saying.
Eveille's avatar

Sparkling Reveler

I think it is possible if it happens at a high enough rate to affect the population in question. If it just a million women around the world who live now due to medical intervention, where they would have died before 100 years ago, then it isn't that big a deal.

It is also only relevant if the mother gives birth to a girl and that girl inherits the small hip size that causes more difficult births. However, even before medical advances of 100 years ago, we are a 200k year old species or thereabouts, women had issues giving birth because of our oversized babies compared to our canal size. It kept being selected for though, so it was clearly not that hazardous to the species as a whole is what I am getting out of it.
I see your point that medical intervention interferes with the process of natural selection, but I think that for that to really become an issue, we would have to be taken away completely from technology and tools and all our knowledge(to ensure that we do not improvise tools). But since knowledge and technology tend to get more sophisticated with time, what are the odds of that ever happening? So if women do start to develop smaller hips, as long as that happens we will cut open their stomachs to get those slim-hipped baby girls out anyway.
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For the humor: Umm... you do realize that within the last few weeks of pregnancy the mother's hips start getting like flexible to detach to deliver the baby, right? Yeah, I know it's completely gross. They call it round ligament pain or some bs like that.
I had an emergency c section. Why? My son thought it was hilarious to hold on tight to his umbilical cord then wondered why he couldn't breathe. His heartbeat kept dropping. I'm a small person, but the only reason I had to have a cesarean was because he was having problems. I fully believe if I had not had a c section, I would have had a still birth or he would have been brain damaged.


Forgive me for this, but I am laughing so hard at your wording. rofl
You're clever.
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For the humor: Umm... you do realize that within the last few weeks of pregnancy the mother's hips start getting like flexible to detach to deliver the baby, right? Yeah, I know it's completely gross. They call it round ligament pain or some bs like that.
I had an emergency c section. Why? My son thought it was hilarious to hold on tight to his umbilical cord then wondered why he couldn't breathe. His heartbeat kept dropping. I'm a small person, but the only reason I had to have a cesarean was because he was having problems. I fully believe if I had not had a c section, I would have had a still birth or he would have been brain damaged.


Forgive me for this, but I am laughing so hard at your wording. rofl
You're clever.

rofl After they pulled him out, he was still holding on to it! He had such a big smile on his face until he realized how cold and bright it was. Then, you swear someone was trying to kill him...
Blood Valkyrie's avatar

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For the humor: Umm... you do realize that within the last few weeks of pregnancy the mother's hips start getting like flexible to detach to deliver the baby, right? Yeah, I know it's completely gross. They call it round ligament pain or some bs like that.
I had an emergency c section. Why? My son thought it was hilarious to hold on tight to his umbilical cord then wondered why he couldn't breathe. His heartbeat kept dropping. I'm a small person, but the only reason I had to have a cesarean was because he was having problems. I fully believe if I had not had a c section, I would have had a still birth or he would have been brain damaged.


Forgive me for this, but I am laughing so hard at your wording. rofl
You're clever.

rofl After they pulled him out, he was still holding on to it! He had such a big smile on his face until he realized how cold and bright it was. Then, you swear someone was trying to kill him...


I didn't know newborns could smile.
 klein_eine's avatar

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For the humor: Umm... you do realize that within the last few weeks of pregnancy the mother's hips start getting like flexible to detach to deliver the baby, right? Yeah, I know it's completely gross. They call it round ligament pain or some bs like that.
I had an emergency c section. Why? My son thought it was hilarious to hold on tight to his umbilical cord then wondered why he couldn't breathe. His heartbeat kept dropping. I'm a small person, but the only reason I had to have a cesarean was because he was having problems. I fully believe if I had not had a c section, I would have had a still birth or he would have been brain damaged.


Forgive me for this, but I am laughing so hard at your wording. rofl
You're clever.

rofl After they pulled him out, he was still holding on to it! He had such a big smile on his face until he realized how cold and bright it was. Then, you swear someone was trying to kill him...


I didn't know newborns could smile.

They can smile or it could have been gas. Regardless of what the cause was, he was smiling until he realized it was so bright and cold. Then, he screamed and cried...
Blood Valkyrie's avatar

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For the humor: Umm... you do realize that within the last few weeks of pregnancy the mother's hips start getting like flexible to detach to deliver the baby, right? Yeah, I know it's completely gross. They call it round ligament pain or some bs like that.
I had an emergency c section. Why? My son thought it was hilarious to hold on tight to his umbilical cord then wondered why he couldn't breathe. His heartbeat kept dropping. I'm a small person, but the only reason I had to have a cesarean was because he was having problems. I fully believe if I had not had a c section, I would have had a still birth or he would have been brain damaged.


Forgive me for this, but I am laughing so hard at your wording. rofl
You're clever.

rofl After they pulled him out, he was still holding on to it! He had such a big smile on his face until he realized how cold and bright it was. Then, you swear someone was trying to kill him...


I didn't know newborns could smile.

They can smile or it could have been gas. Regardless of what the cause was, he was smiling until he realized it was so bright and cold. Then, he screamed and cried...


Poor little baby. Well at least he's fine now. razz
You are wondering that overtime, genetic traits that would otherwise not stay in the gene pool (such as hips too small to give birth) would eventually become the dominant trait? It would be unlikely because that trait would be recessive, so without some big gene pool changing factor, it would stay as the minority. However, percentages of women with such difficulties might increase. One would argue that giving medical help to anyone with a genetic issue to the point where they are able to reproduce increases the percentage of the trait within the population.

People seem to be giving you s**t for your example. If you would like another you can use the example of the mother having her tail bone impeding the baby's ability to fix through the birth canal. That is what my mother has, and possibly given to my sister and I. Thanks to medical intervention, a genetic trait that would otherwise not of been passed down that inhibits a woman's ability to naturally give birth has persisted.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

Immediate symptom
You are wondering that overtime, genetic traits that would otherwise not stay in the gene pool (such as hips too small to give birth) would eventually become the dominant trait? It would be unlikely because that trait would be recessive, so without some big gene pool changing factor, it would stay as the minority. However, percentages of women with such difficulties might increase. One would argue that giving medical help to anyone with a genetic issue to the point where they are able to reproduce increases the percentage of the trait within the population.

People seem to be giving you s**t for your example. If you would like another you can use the example of the mother having her tail bone impeding the baby's ability to fix through the birth canal. That is what my mother has, and possibly given to my sister and I. Thanks to medical intervention, a genetic trait that would otherwise not of been passed down that inhibits a woman's ability to naturally give birth has persisted.


But is that genetic and hereditary?
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
You are wondering that overtime, genetic traits that would otherwise not stay in the gene pool (such as hips too small to give birth) would eventually become the dominant trait? It would be unlikely because that trait would be recessive, so without some big gene pool changing factor, it would stay as the minority. However, percentages of women with such difficulties might increase. One would argue that giving medical help to anyone with a genetic issue to the point where they are able to reproduce increases the percentage of the trait within the population.

People seem to be giving you s**t for your example. If you would like another you can use the example of the mother having her tail bone impeding the baby's ability to fix through the birth canal. That is what my mother has, and possibly given to my sister and I. Thanks to medical intervention, a genetic trait that would otherwise not of been passed down that inhibits a woman's ability to naturally give birth has persisted.


But is that genetic and hereditary?



A baby-hook tail bone? Yes.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

Immediate symptom
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
You are wondering that overtime, genetic traits that would otherwise not stay in the gene pool (such as hips too small to give birth) would eventually become the dominant trait? It would be unlikely because that trait would be recessive, so without some big gene pool changing factor, it would stay as the minority. However, percentages of women with such difficulties might increase. One would argue that giving medical help to anyone with a genetic issue to the point where they are able to reproduce increases the percentage of the trait within the population.

People seem to be giving you s**t for your example. If you would like another you can use the example of the mother having her tail bone impeding the baby's ability to fix through the birth canal. That is what my mother has, and possibly given to my sister and I. Thanks to medical intervention, a genetic trait that would otherwise not of been passed down that inhibits a woman's ability to naturally give birth has persisted.


But is that genetic and hereditary?



A baby-hook tail bone? Yes.


Cool.

But wouldn't that make it a dominant trait?


Unless your father had the same gene or same issue or something?
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
You are wondering that overtime, genetic traits that would otherwise not stay in the gene pool (such as hips too small to give birth) would eventually become the dominant trait? It would be unlikely because that trait would be recessive, so without some big gene pool changing factor, it would stay as the minority. However, percentages of women with such difficulties might increase. One would argue that giving medical help to anyone with a genetic issue to the point where they are able to reproduce increases the percentage of the trait within the population.

People seem to be giving you s**t for your example. If you would like another you can use the example of the mother having her tail bone impeding the baby's ability to fix through the birth canal. That is what my mother has, and possibly given to my sister and I. Thanks to medical intervention, a genetic trait that would otherwise not of been passed down that inhibits a woman's ability to naturally give birth has persisted.


But is that genetic and hereditary?



A baby-hook tail bone? Yes.


Cool.

But wouldn't that make it a dominant trait?


Unless your father had the same gene or same issue or something?


I am not sure. I would assume it's resessive otherwise a lot more people would have it. But I doubt it is one single gene that decides it,
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

Immediate symptom
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
You are wondering that overtime, genetic traits that would otherwise not stay in the gene pool (such as hips too small to give birth) would eventually become the dominant trait? It would be unlikely because that trait would be recessive, so without some big gene pool changing factor, it would stay as the minority. However, percentages of women with such difficulties might increase. One would argue that giving medical help to anyone with a genetic issue to the point where they are able to reproduce increases the percentage of the trait within the population.

People seem to be giving you s**t for your example. If you would like another you can use the example of the mother having her tail bone impeding the baby's ability to fix through the birth canal. That is what my mother has, and possibly given to my sister and I. Thanks to medical intervention, a genetic trait that would otherwise not of been passed down that inhibits a woman's ability to naturally give birth has persisted.


But is that genetic and hereditary?



A baby-hook tail bone? Yes.


Cool.

But wouldn't that make it a dominant trait?


Unless your father had the same gene or same issue or something?


I am not sure. I would assume it's resessive otherwise a lot more people would have it. But I doubt it is one single gene that decides it,


Herm... yeah. xp

So really it would take two parents, rather than one mother with the issue. Doesn't negate the benefit of a healthy child; plus that can be broken off if need be, not like it does anything xD
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
Suicidesoldier#1
Immediate symptom
You are wondering that overtime, genetic traits that would otherwise not stay in the gene pool (such as hips too small to give birth) would eventually become the dominant trait? It would be unlikely because that trait would be recessive, so without some big gene pool changing factor, it would stay as the minority. However, percentages of women with such difficulties might increase. One would argue that giving medical help to anyone with a genetic issue to the point where they are able to reproduce increases the percentage of the trait within the population.

People seem to be giving you s**t for your example. If you would like another you can use the example of the mother having her tail bone impeding the baby's ability to fix through the birth canal. That is what my mother has, and possibly given to my sister and I. Thanks to medical intervention, a genetic trait that would otherwise not of been passed down that inhibits a woman's ability to naturally give birth has persisted.


But is that genetic and hereditary?



A baby-hook tail bone? Yes.


Cool.

But wouldn't that make it a dominant trait?


Unless your father had the same gene or same issue or something?


I am not sure. I would assume it's resessive otherwise a lot more people would have it. But I doubt it is one single gene that decides it,


Herm... yeah. xp

So really it would take two parents, rather than one mother with the issue. Doesn't negate the benefit of a healthy child; plus that can be broken off if need be, not like it does anything xD


I'm not saying it hurt the child. I'm saying that my survival has potentially kept this genetic trait within the gene pool when it wouldn't of without medical intervention.

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