Welcome to Gaia! ::

Primal Conundrum's avatar

IRL Genius

Alright, it's a simple question but I suck at chemistry so I can't figure out how to run the numbers to figure this one out. I know it can be figured out using the ideal gas law, but I have no idea how to use that. Help would be appreciated!

I'm trying to figure out what the increase in volume is when boiling mercury and changing it from a liquid to a gas. For the purposes of this, the temperature can be assumed to be right around the boiling point of mercury (356.7 °C).

To clarify, I know that for example water increases in volume to about 1600 times its previous volume when going from a liquid to a gas. I'm trying to figure out what the number is on mercury.

Any help would be great, thank you!
washu_2004's avatar

Shameless Heckler

11,100 Points
  • Brandisher 100
  • Risky Lifestyle 100
  • Peoplewatcher 100
Primal Conundrum
Alright, it's a simple question but I suck at chemistry so I can't figure out how to run the numbers to figure this one out. I know it can be figured out using the ideal gas law, but I have no idea how to use that. Help would be appreciated!

I'm trying to figure out what the increase in volume is when boiling mercury and changing it from a liquid to a gas. For the purposes of this, the temperature can be assumed to be right around the boiling point of mercury (356.7 °C).

To clarify, I know that for example water increases in volume to about 1600 times its previous volume when going from a liquid to a gas. I'm trying to figure out what the number is on mercury.

Any help would be great, thank you!


Use the gas constant law.

N m^-2 = 1 Pascal

PV = nRT
V = nRT/P = (187.8 g / 200.6 g Hg/mol) (8.314472 m^3 Pa /K mol) (862.7) /
(52995 Pa) = 0.1267 m^3

187.6 g mercury has a volume of 0.1267 m^3 when in vapor form. you can do the math from there to work out the ratio.
Primal Conundrum's avatar

IRL Genius

washu_2004
Primal Conundrum
Alright, it's a simple question but I suck at chemistry so I can't figure out how to run the numbers to figure this one out. I know it can be figured out using the ideal gas law, but I have no idea how to use that. Help would be appreciated!

I'm trying to figure out what the increase in volume is when boiling mercury and changing it from a liquid to a gas. For the purposes of this, the temperature can be assumed to be right around the boiling point of mercury (356.7 °C).

To clarify, I know that for example water increases in volume to about 1600 times its previous volume when going from a liquid to a gas. I'm trying to figure out what the number is on mercury.

Any help would be great, thank you!


Use the gas constant law.

N m^-2 = 1 Pascal

PV = nRT
V = nRT/P = (187.8 g / 200.6 g Hg/mol) (8.314472 m^3 Pa /K mol) (862.7) /
(52995 Pa) = 0.1267 m^3

187.6 g mercury has a volume of 0.1267 m^3 when in vapor form. you can do the math from there to work out the ratio.


When you say 0.1267 m^3, does the m stand for meters? Sorry, I'm trash at this stuff.

Assuming that's meters, my numbers show that it expands by roughly ten times in volume, give or take.
washu_2004's avatar

Shameless Heckler

11,100 Points
  • Brandisher 100
  • Risky Lifestyle 100
  • Peoplewatcher 100
Primal Conundrum
washu_2004
Primal Conundrum
Alright, it's a simple question but I suck at chemistry so I can't figure out how to run the numbers to figure this one out. I know it can be figured out using the ideal gas law, but I have no idea how to use that. Help would be appreciated!

I'm trying to figure out what the increase in volume is when boiling mercury and changing it from a liquid to a gas. For the purposes of this, the temperature can be assumed to be right around the boiling point of mercury (356.7 °C).

To clarify, I know that for example water increases in volume to about 1600 times its previous volume when going from a liquid to a gas. I'm trying to figure out what the number is on mercury.

Any help would be great, thank you!


Use the gas constant law.

N m^-2 = 1 Pascal

PV = nRT
V = nRT/P = (187.8 g / 200.6 g Hg/mol) (8.314472 m^3 Pa /K mol) (862.7) /
(52995 Pa) = 0.1267 m^3

187.6 g mercury has a volume of 0.1267 m^3 when in vapor form. you can do the math from there to work out the ratio.


When you say 0.1267 m^3, does the m stand for meters? Sorry, I'm trash at this stuff.

Assuming that's meters, my numbers show that it expands by roughly ten times in volume, give or take.


Yep m^3 is cubic meters.
Primal Conundrum's avatar

IRL Genius

washu_2004
Primal Conundrum
washu_2004
Primal Conundrum
Alright, it's a simple question but I suck at chemistry so I can't figure out how to run the numbers to figure this one out. I know it can be figured out using the ideal gas law, but I have no idea how to use that. Help would be appreciated!

I'm trying to figure out what the increase in volume is when boiling mercury and changing it from a liquid to a gas. For the purposes of this, the temperature can be assumed to be right around the boiling point of mercury (356.7 °C).

To clarify, I know that for example water increases in volume to about 1600 times its previous volume when going from a liquid to a gas. I'm trying to figure out what the number is on mercury.

Any help would be great, thank you!


Use the gas constant law.

N m^-2 = 1 Pascal

PV = nRT
V = nRT/P = (187.8 g / 200.6 g Hg/mol) (8.314472 m^3 Pa /K mol) (862.7) /
(52995 Pa) = 0.1267 m^3

187.6 g mercury has a volume of 0.1267 m^3 when in vapor form. you can do the math from there to work out the ratio.


When you say 0.1267 m^3, does the m stand for meters? Sorry, I'm trash at this stuff.

Assuming that's meters, my numbers show that it expands by roughly ten times in volume, give or take.


Yep m^3 is cubic meters.


Cool! Yeah, looks like the conversion ratio is a bit under ten times expansion. I don't need it to be exact, I'm using this for something in some fiction I'm working on and I don't want to be one of *those* writers who does something in flagrant disregard for the actual science of stuff.

Thank you so much for the help with this!

Quick Reply

Submit
Manage Your Items
Other Stuff
Get GCash
Offers
Get Items
More Items
Where Everyone Hangs Out
Other Community Areas
Virtual Spaces
Fun Stuff
Gaia's Games