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Dapper Ladykiller

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Mallophe
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Well, it really can be rather difficult for those who don't speak it as a native language. I'm Chinese myself, and I've seen quite a few of my classmates struggling with the class offered at my school. I would be happy to teach you the language. Of course, it's been more than ten years since I permanantly moved to the US, but I still speak it fluently enough to be a tutor.


Wo keyi shuo yi dian er zhong wen, danshi wo bu zhidao hen duo. See it's like broken Chinese, I studied for a year and a half so I know some basics. Thank you so much, I hope it's not a bother.


Whoops, couldn't get back to you at all yesterday. Way too busy.
Well, your basics seem to be deadon just from that one sentence. But I have to ask you this. How good are you at reading and writing Chinese characters? Because while your pinying is very good, you should also know how to type, write and read simplified characters. (Unless you're going to Taiwan, Hong Kong or Macau, you shouldn't bother with traditional. And most people who first learn simplified can take a few good stabs at traditional anyway. It's just a bunch of extra strokes.)


It's much easier to go from learning tradition to learning simplified. Going the other way around is a massive headache, I heard.
I learned traditional characters, and I can't for the life of me read simplified. Some things are just so simplified that it's utterly ridiculous.

Simplified to Traditional is quite a bit easier since you can see how the simplified that you are familiar with came about from the traditional.
From personal experience, when I moved from Taiwan into mainland China, it was a pain at first (there were some characters I kept confusing, and still confuse to this day), but I learned most of it pretty quickly. I cannot for the life of me imagine trying to go from China to TW.
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VermisMysteriis
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Mallophe
Viral_Catastrophe
Well, it really can be rather difficult for those who don't speak it as a native language. I'm Chinese myself, and I've seen quite a few of my classmates struggling with the class offered at my school. I would be happy to teach you the language. Of course, it's been more than ten years since I permanantly moved to the US, but I still speak it fluently enough to be a tutor.


Wo keyi shuo yi dian er zhong wen, danshi wo bu zhidao hen duo. See it's like broken Chinese, I studied for a year and a half so I know some basics. Thank you so much, I hope it's not a bother.


Whoops, couldn't get back to you at all yesterday. Way too busy.
Well, your basics seem to be deadon just from that one sentence. But I have to ask you this. How good are you at reading and writing Chinese characters? Because while your pinying is very good, you should also know how to type, write and read simplified characters. (Unless you're going to Taiwan, Hong Kong or Macau, you shouldn't bother with traditional. And most people who first learn simplified can take a few good stabs at traditional anyway. It's just a bunch of extra strokes.)


It's much easier to go from learning tradition to learning simplified. Going the other way around is a massive headache, I heard.
Well, I grew up in Hangzhou and when I came to the US, I was still educated on simplified. So I'm just speaking from personal experience. But maybe it is much easier to go the other way. I have no idea.
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Viral_Catastrophe
Well, it really can be rather difficult for those who don't speak it as a native language. I'm Chinese myself, and I've seen quite a few of my classmates struggling with the class offered at my school. I would be happy to teach you the language. Of course, it's been more than ten years since I permanantly moved to the US, but I still speak it fluently enough to be a tutor.


grammar and speaking-wise, I found it a lot easier than Japanese since it doesn't use conjugation. It's only the writing that's hard for me. Plus, my native language is Vietnamese, which is a tonal language like Mandarin and Cantonese, so the tones were no problem for me at all (but I find the tones in Mandarin to be much, much easier than Vietnamese. Dunno about Cantonese, though, since I've never learned that).
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Well, it really can be rather difficult for those who don't speak it as a native language. I'm Chinese myself, and I've seen quite a few of my classmates struggling with the class offered at my school. I would be happy to teach you the language. Of course, it's been more than ten years since I permanantly moved to the US, but I still speak it fluently enough to be a tutor.


grammar and speaking-wise, I found it a lot easier than Japanese since it doesn't use conjugation. It's only the writing that's hard for me. Plus, my native language is Vietnamese, which is a tonal language like Mandarin and Cantonese, so the tones were no problem for me at all (but I find the tones in Mandarin to be much, much easier than Vietnamese. Dunno about Cantonese, though, since I've never learned that).


I take a self study in Japanese and I have to say that you're right about the conjugation. That killed me for a while. Still, I actually find it easier to pronounce Japanese than Chinese because Japanese just has a well, flatter tone. I mean, as long as you know the pronunciation basics, there's really no doubt as to how you might pronounce a word. In Chinese though, if you're just given the pinying, there's four ways to go about it.

I've actually never learned Vietnamese or even heard it much. And I can't really vouch for Cantonese either. I have friends who speak the language, but it sounds foreign to my ears. Too low and gutteral in my opinion. Doesn't flow in my ears either.
I'm a native Cantonese speaker and I've noticed that Chinese grammar is kinda similar to english
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Well, it really can be rather difficult for those who don't speak it as a native language. I'm Chinese myself, and I've seen quite a few of my classmates struggling with the class offered at my school. I would be happy to teach you the language. Of course, it's been more than ten years since I permanantly moved to the US, but I still speak it fluently enough to be a tutor.


grammar and speaking-wise, I found it a lot easier than Japanese since it doesn't use conjugation. It's only the writing that's hard for me. Plus, my native language is Vietnamese, which is a tonal language like Mandarin and Cantonese, so the tones were no problem for me at all (but I find the tones in Mandarin to be much, much easier than Vietnamese. Dunno about Cantonese, though, since I've never learned that).


I take a self study in Japanese and I have to say that you're right about the conjugation. That killed me for a while. Still, I actually find it easier to pronounce Japanese than Chinese because Japanese just has a well, flatter tone. I mean, as long as you know the pronunciation basics, there's really no doubt as to how you might pronounce a word. In Chinese though, if you're just given the pinying, there's four ways to go about it.

I've actually never learned Vietnamese or even heard it much. And I can't really vouch for Cantonese either. I have friends who speak the language, but it sounds foreign to my ears. Too low and gutteral in my opinion. Doesn't flow in my ears either.


yeah, Japanese is a lot easier to pronounce than Chinese. When I said speaking-wise, I meant that it's easier for me to carry a conversation in spoken Chinese than spoken Japanese because I don't have to worry about whether I'm conjugating right or not. I always have trouble with conversational Japanese because I often worry that I'm speaking grammatically incorrectly.
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Well, it really can be rather difficult for those who don't speak it as a native language. I'm Chinese myself, and I've seen quite a few of my classmates struggling with the class offered at my school. I would be happy to teach you the language. Of course, it's been more than ten years since I permanantly moved to the US, but I still speak it fluently enough to be a tutor.


grammar and speaking-wise, I found it a lot easier than Japanese since it doesn't use conjugation. It's only the writing that's hard for me. Plus, my native language is Vietnamese, which is a tonal language like Mandarin and Cantonese, so the tones were no problem for me at all (but I find the tones in Mandarin to be much, much easier than Vietnamese. Dunno about Cantonese, though, since I've never learned that).


I take a self study in Japanese and I have to say that you're right about the conjugation. That killed me for a while. Still, I actually find it easier to pronounce Japanese than Chinese because Japanese just has a well, flatter tone. I mean, as long as you know the pronunciation basics, there's really no doubt as to how you might pronounce a word. In Chinese though, if you're just given the pinying, there's four ways to go about it.

I've actually never learned Vietnamese or even heard it much. And I can't really vouch for Cantonese either. I have friends who speak the language, but it sounds foreign to my ears. Too low and gutteral in my opinion. Doesn't flow in my ears either.


yeah, Japanese is a lot easier to pronounce than Chinese. When I said speaking-wise, I meant that it's easier for me to carry a conversation in spoken Chinese than spoken Japanese because I don't have to worry about whether I'm conjugating right or not. I always have trouble with conversational Japanese because I often worry that I'm speaking grammatically incorrectly.


Oh yes, I see. You're right about that. I also have the same fear when I speak Japanese because it always feels like I'm doing something wrong. Well, more practice should help with that.
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Mallophe
Viral_Catastrophe
Well, it really can be rather difficult for those who don't speak it as a native language. I'm Chinese myself, and I've seen quite a few of my classmates struggling with the class offered at my school. I would be happy to teach you the language. Of course, it's been more than ten years since I permanantly moved to the US, but I still speak it fluently enough to be a tutor.


Wo keyi shuo yi dian er zhong wen, danshi wo bu zhidao hen duo. See it's like broken Chinese, I studied for a year and a half so I know some basics. Thank you so much, I hope it's not a bother.

thats not a broken sentence ._. it makes a fine sense
im a native chinese 4laugh
Mallophe
Difficult! Can someone please teach me Mandarin or Cantonese? whee I have a special someone I would love to surprise heart


Don't worry it takes time to learn ( : I am currently learning Chinese... one of my reasons was to surprise someone too.
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If you need any help, ask away, alright?

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