My Research Of The Fallen Angels


A fallen angel is an angel that has been banished from Heaven.


Origin of the term
While most people have heard the term fallen angel[citation needed], few know where it comes from, because it cannot be found in the Bible directly. The origin of the term lies in the Hebrew word for giants in this verse:

“ Genesis 6:4 There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bear children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown. ”

The Hebrew word translated as giants here is nephilim, a plural, which itself derives from the root word Naphal, which means to fall. The apocryphal Book of Enoch explains that a group of rebellious angels "left their first estate" (heaven, or the sky) and came down (fell) to Earth to marry human women and have children with them. Jude makes mention of these angels in the New Testament:

“ Jude 1:6 And the angels which kept not their first estate, but left their own habitation, he hath reserved in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day. ”

Due to the disastrous results of this forbidden intermingling, many have come to view the word "fallen" as denoting a fall from grace[citation needed], though it seems that the original meaning was simply to descend from the heavens.

Definition of the term
In some Christian traditions, a fallen angel is angel that has been exiled or banished from Heaven. Often such banishment is a punishment for disobeying or rebelling against God. One early source for information on angelology and demonology, is the Persian prophet Zoroaster, who is thought to have influenced Judeo-Christian beliefs [1]. The best-known fallen angel is Lucifer. Formerly second only to God, Lucifer rebelled and was cast down into Hell for his offenses. According to some traditions, fallen angels will roam the Earth until Judgment Day, when they will be banished to Hell.


Reasons for their fall
Gustave Doré's depiction of Satan from John Milton's Paradise LostThere are a number of different beliefs regarding the origins and motivations of fallen angels. Many focus on issues of free will, lust, pride, or the incomprehensibility of the acts of God.


Consequences of free will
It is generally accepted by most Christians that the fallen angels were cast out of Heaven because of actions taken against God. These actions were enabled because the angels were granted free will. Generally, these actions included active rebellion, doubt in God's motives or plans, or a rejection of the system of Heaven. Pride is often involved, especially in cases where an angel believed itself to be more powerful than God (Lucifer being the prime example among these).


Origen
Origen, a father of the early Christian Church, believed that God had created all angels to be equal and free. However, in possessing the power of free will, some of them began to move further away from God of their own volition.

Origen states metaphorically that, although some angels fell and became humans or demons, all hope is not lost. He theorizes that by practicing virtue, men and demons can again become angels. While considered an early Father of the Church, Origen was deemed a heretic as a result of some of his writings and teachings, which did not conform to accepted scripture or tradition. Mainly, his concept of Apocatastasis, the belief that all beings (humans, fallen angels, demons and Satan) will return to God through God's love and mercy, was deemed unacceptable at that time. His excommunication was posthumously reversed.


Lust
The following comes from a series of ancient texts referenced in the Bible called "The Three Books of Enoch", a set of books found in the Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament.

According to these books, it is because of lust that some angels fell from Heaven. God asked the "Watchers" (Grigori), a select group of angels, to assist the Archangels in the creation of Eden. Those Grigori who descended to Earth saw the daughters of men and became enchanted with them. Consequently, the Grigori began to reveal to man some of the secrets of Heaven, such as astrology, weapons production, and the vanity of enhancing the face and body with perfumes and cosmetics. The Grigori then fell in love with human women. According to the text, some of the Grigori even took wives and created offspring, giants known as the Nephilim. This made God so angry that he cursed those Grigori who had betrayed Him, threw them out of Heaven, made them mortal and transformed them into demons. God sent the Great Flood to cleanse the Earth of the wanton killing and destruction perpetrated by the Nephilim. Notable angels who fell in this account are Semyazza, Samael, and Azazel.


Pride
This belief involves Lucifer's revolution against God, well known amongst Christians. Pride, the gravest of the seven deadly sins, eventually led to the expulsion from Heaven of certain beings, up to and including the highest orders of angels. Lucifer, who himself succumbed to pride, was the first and mightiest angel to be created. With intelligence, radiance, beauty, and power unmatched among all of the angels in Heaven, Lucifer was second in majesty only to God Himself.

Unfortunately, Lucifer became ambitious and self-centered, eventually deciding to prove his power by raising his throne to the height of God's throne. Other angels did not approve of Lucifer's plan; they did not want a lower being trying symbolically to become the equal of God. When Lucifer enacted his scheme, he was instantly hurled out of Heaven. This account of the rebellion might have come from several ancient Canaanite manuscripts that deal with Shahar, one of their own deities[citation needed].

Catholic theologians have speculated that the incarnation of Christ was revealed to the angels. The idea that all of Heaven must bow before Christ, formed in part from the lesser nature of humanity, supposedly motivated the prideful actions of Lucifer (cf. Suarez, De Angelis, lib. VII, xiii).


Bowing to mankind
According to the Quran, when God created man, He wanted His angels to acknowledge man by bowing down to him, but one angel (Lucifer) did not obey His mandate.(However Muslims do not believe Satan to be a fallen angel, as he was never an angel but a jinn).

A later mention of this idea can be found in "Vita Adae et Evae", an apocryphal text which most scholars agree was written somewhere near the end of the 10th century AD.

XIII: The devil replied, 'Adam, what dost thou tell me? It is for thy sake that I have been hurled from that place. When thou wast formed, I was hurled out of the presence of God and banished from the company of the angels. When God blew into thee the breath of life and thy face and likeness was made in the image of God, Michael also brought thee and made (us) worship thee in the sight of God; and God the Lord spake: Here is Adam. I have made thee in our image and likeness.'
XIV: And Michael went out and called all the angels saying: 'Worship the image of God as the Lord God hath commanded.' And Michael himself worshipped first; then he called me and said: 'Worship the image of God the Lord.' And I answered, 'I have no (need) to worship Adam.' And since Michael kept urging me to worship, I said to him, 'Why dost thou urge me? I will not worship an inferior and younger being. I am his senior in the Creation, before he was made was I already made. It is his duty to worship me.'
XV: When the angels who were under me heard this, they refused to worship him. And Michael saith, 'Worship the image of God, but if thou wilt not worship him, the Lord God will be wroth with thee.' And I said, 'If He be wroth with me, I will set my seat above the stars of heaven and will be like the Highest.'
Anon. Vita Adae et Evae, 13–15. [2]

Obedience to God
There is a Sufi version of the story that states that Lucifer was the angel who loved God the most. At the time of the angels' creation, God told them to bow to no one but Him.

However, God created mankind, whom he considered superior to the angels, and commanded the angels to bow before the new figure. Lucifer refused, partly because he could not forget the first commandment, but also because he would bow to his beloved God only. The other angels saw Lucifer as insubordinate, and expelled him from Heaven.

Those who believe in this version do not consider Lucifer or the fallen angels to be demons, since they did not rebel against God by refusing his mandate, but rather believed that creatures should bow before only God, and no one else.


Fallen angels by rank
Some of the fallen were supposedly members of more than one rank, but this list will only list the primary rank, or the rank that is most well-known, of each apostate angel. For more information, see the articles of the various entities.


First Sphere

Satan
Asmodeus
Astaroth
Leviathan
Samael
Semyazza
Azazel
Beelzebub
Berith
Lauviah
Lucifer
Marou
Salikotal
Gressil
Focalor
Forneus
Murmur
Nelchael
Phenex
Purson
Raum
Sonneillon
Verrine



Second Sphere

Balam
Marchosias
Nilaihah
Oeillet
Paimon
Rosier
Agares
Ariel
Barbiel
Barbatos
Belial
Ielaliah
Purson
Sealiah
Senciner
Uzziel
Amy
Beleth
Carnivean
Carreau
Crocell
Gaap
Lehahiah
Uvall



Third Sphere

Belphegor
Imamiah
Nisroch
Nithael
Verrier
Adramelech
Ananael
Basasael
Dagon
Mammon
Mephistopheles
Moloch
Rimmon
Rumjal
Sarfael
Thammuz
Zagiel
Arakiba
Arakiel
Araxiel
Arioch
Armans
Asael
Asbeel
Astoreth
Caim
Iuvart



Others
Abigor
Adirael
Aldebaran
Anane[┼]
Antares
Armers/Armaros[†]
Asbeel
Atarculph
Asael/Azazel
Azaradel
Akibeel/Azibeel[†]
Azkeel
Azza
Badariel
Baraqel
Batarel
Batraal/Batarjal[†]
Busasejal
Chobaliel
Danel/Daniel[†]
Ertael/Ertrael[†]
Exael
Ezequeel
Fomalhaut
Gadreel/Gadriel
Gurson
Hakael
Hananel
Haures
Hosampsich
Iomuel
Jeqon
Jetrel
Jove
Junier
Kasdaye
Kasbeel
Kokabel
Meresin
Mulciber
Naamah
Nithael
Omiel
Orus
Penemue
Ramuel[†]
Regent
Regulus
Rugziel
Rumjal
Samathael
Sameveel
Samsaveel[†]
Saraknyal[†]
Sariel
Seriel
Shaftiel
Simapesiel
Tabaet
Tamiel
Temeluchus
Thausael
Tiril
Tumael
Turael[†]
Urakabarameel[†]
Uzza
Xaphan
Wormwood
Yomyael[†]
Zavebe[†]
† This link redirects to the Book of Enoch, which lists a large number of "the fallen".