Disclaimer:



This is a series centered around bringing a detailed personal account to the process of living and self-discovery as one identified by themselves and others as a "Cryptid," or a supernatural being most commonly depicted in folklore. It is designed to shed light on a possible way of life and stir up a community and conversation within that community about cryptozoology and what it means (possibly) to be a cryptid. This is a series centered around bringing a detailed personal account to the process of living and self-discovery as one identified by themselves and others as a "Cryptid," or a supernatural being most commonly depicted in folklore. It is designed to shed light on a possible way of life and stir up a community and conversation within that community about cryptozoology and what it means (possibly) to be a cryptid.


But why?

Why write about these experiences? Why sit here and grind out post after post and put myself through the trouble of remembering dreams each (or most) mornings? Well, other than not having a job and being away from the expensive art equipment at school for the summer, I feel there's a certain lack of personal testimony (certainly, the testimonies available lack a scientific method) on the subject of paranormal experiences such as this. Let me explain. A few months ago I was called a cryptid. What? What's a cryptid? Did you misspell "cryptic?" 'Fraid not. Cryptid was the word, and after some research even more questions arose, namely centered around why there was a lack of documentation--that I could find with my mortal search skills--on "humans" as cryptids--that is, people who live life believing they're normal to discover that they are actually some fantastic creature un(dis)provable by science. The only evidence of such were on forums in which people, likely trying to stand out, seemed to identify as a cryptid; when pushed, however, all these yielded a bland blanket label: "cryptid."

That's it. No other specifications. All my research into cryptozology tells me that this is impossible. One cannot simply be a Cryptid-blanc. Where were the werewolves, the shadow people, the long-lost crystal skull kids? I'll admit, one of the criteria put forth by Mr. Eberhart--that is, being a member of a species that is somehow extraordinary--abnormally large, having a special ability, etc.--could apply to some people, but (a) there are so many extraordinary people in this species of ours that it really would be hard to consider someone truly a cryptid and (b) that certain labels--esper, mystic, dare-devil, etc.--have come to fill the categorisation needs of the bulk of extraordinary examples.

So what then? Do we start labeling people "cryptid-esper?" I think not. Espers are simply too common. Spend a few minutes searching for forums; these psychics for the new era (really, I love the whole esper thing. Best thing to come out of the Red Scare, if you ask me) are ubiquitous. Who might be a cryptid is someone featured on such talent shows as "Superhuman," Stan Lee's "Superhuman," "Ripley's Believe it or Not," etc. These are what I'm after. There are likely only a handful of pocket populations of Sasquatch, and human cryptids should be just as rare. With that comes the questions: what makes these people cryptids, and how is the cryptid experience? If I am a cryptid after all (and I have my doubts; I'm not very extraordinary, and I doubt even my more mystical moments could be classified as cryptid behavior), a meticulous introspection into what might make me one, I hope, could lay some foundation, bring some cryptids out to share just what kind of cryptid they are, and what makes their experience different.