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I'd like to post some encouragement for those seeking agents.

My boss of YALITCHAT finally got revisions back from Mark McVeigh, and boy, she practically has to do a re-write of her entire manuscript. So for those who have been mislead into thinking your novel has to be practically perfect when you agent, scratch that off as bull. Not saying you shouldn't try and make it as perfect as possible, but make it as perfect as possible in YOUR eyes AFTER you've received a good amount of critique. Agents just want to see your raw talent and know that your novel has potential and can be worked on. It also depends on how much time an agent can expend into a single novel, and Mark McVeigh is obviously dedicated to that.
DeviousSnowPuppy's avatar

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This is very helpful!! Thank you so much!
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thank you for the tips, they really helped 4laugh .
I_Write_Ivre's avatar

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Wolvercote
I'd like to post some encouragement for those seeking agents.

My boss of YALITCHAT finally got revisions back from Mark McVeigh, and boy, she practically has to do a re-write of her entire manuscript. So for those who have been mislead into thinking your novel has to be practically perfect when you agent, scratch that off as bull. Not saying you shouldn't try and make it as perfect as possible, but make it as perfect as possible in YOUR eyes AFTER you've received a good amount of critique. Agents just want to see your raw talent and know that your novel has potential and can be worked on. It also depends on how much time an agent can expend into a single novel, and Mark McVeigh is obviously dedicated to that.


Sounds like a helpful agency. I'll check 'em out.
edwardgirl444's avatar

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these links were very useful, thank you!
Hey guys, I was looking around on youtube, and I found this really cool short story. It's from some chick that calls herself Danaus Clarus. She's actually not half bad. She's a new author, it looks like, but she's not half bad at all. I did a bit of stalking, and she has a blog as well. I really encourage you guys to check her out.

Here's her blog:: http://www.danausclarus.blogspot.com/

Here's her youtube video::
phantomkitsune's avatar

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Really helpful. Just want to point out, though, that AP changed their official style a few months ago to be one space after the period. As goes AP, so goes the world (or should, as two spaces is a throwback to typewriters).
phantomkitsune
Really helpful. Just want to point out, though, that AP changed their official style a few months ago to be one space after the period. As goes AP, so goes the world (or should, as two spaces is a throwback to typewriters).


Wow. Are they really rejecting people after spaces after periods?
Racheling's avatar

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The Phoenix Rises Again
phantomkitsune
Really helpful. Just want to point out, though, that AP changed their official style a few months ago to be one space after the period. As goes AP, so goes the world (or should, as two spaces is a throwback to typewriters).


Wow. Are they really rejecting people after spaces after periods?

Absolutely not, no one gets rejected for something like that. I doubt it's even noticed, whichever way you do it. It's just one of those fiddly formatting questions that comes up because some people grew up learning two spaces, but most people have switched to one, and apparently the style guides have been catching up with that as well, which I didn't know. ^^
Racheling
The Phoenix Rises Again
phantomkitsune
Really helpful. Just want to point out, though, that AP changed their official style a few months ago to be one space after the period. As goes AP, so goes the world (or should, as two spaces is a throwback to typewriters).


Wow. Are they really rejecting people after spaces after periods?

Absolutely not, no one gets rejected for something like that. I doubt it's even noticed, whichever way you do it. It's just one of those fiddly formatting questions that comes up because some people grew up learning two spaces, but most people have switched to one, and apparently the style guides have been catching up with that as well, which I didn't know. ^^


That's a huge relief.
I am The Compendium's avatar

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If I have a publisher, do I need an agent?
Racheling's avatar

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I am The Compendium
If I have a publisher, do I need an agent?

My experience is with novels and not graphic novels. I'm not sure how much difference there is, and it's not a yes or no question because it depends on a lot of other details, but here are some thoughts:

If you want to do your own submissions and negotiations, and if you've found a publisher on your own, you can certainly keep going that route. Nothing at all wrong with it, so the short answer is no, you don't need one. And if you've accepted an offer, an agent wouldn't be able to do much for you at this point because you've agreed to the terms (but they could negotiate for future works).

Contracts that are offered to unagented writers are worse deals. Not because the publishers are jerks, but because they know they can offer less or refuse to negotiate much or at all from their boilerplate contract. You just don't have as much leverage (unless you have a prior sales history, or a big name, or some kind of huge platform, etc). You should also make sure to research contracts and make sure you know exactly what you're signing and what kind of clauses to look out for. If you decide to submit to other publishers, you'll still be limited to those that accept unagented submissions.

If you have an offer but haven't accepted (even verbally), there is a window to look for representation. The general way to go about this is to ask the publisher for a bit of time and to email agents with a clear "Offer from [Publisher]" in the subject line. If the publisher is a small press and/or pays little to no advance, most agents won't be interested, so that plays into things as well.

It's a personal decision, and one you should make after researching the benefits of an agent and what they do. Personally I think having an agent is awesome because they guide your career, know tons about the industry, know editors, know contracts, and are there to help with the business side of things. They can also negotiate to keep foreign rights and film rights and try to sell them, meaning you don't have to rely on whether the publisher will (and you will keep more of the money). But there are lots of writers who prefer to go it alone, and that's fine too. It comes down to what works for you.
I am The Compendium
If I have a publisher, do I need an agent?


Short answer: Yes. It should be easier to get one, since a huge chunk of the work is now down.

Longer answer: You probably want one to handle the boring contract stuff. Also would help in the long term.

Pro's often say that if a publisher is interested to tell them your agent will be in touch, and then go grab one. I'd email a few agents and tell them you have a publisher interested but need an agent's assistance.

They'd be stupid not to help. Easy money. You did the hard part, getting someone interested. They just have to iron out the contract and accept their pay. Worst that can happen is they drop you after it's all done.

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