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Just as the topic asks: what's your motivation to write? What gets your pencil scratching on paper, or fingers dancing on the keyboard? Only another random question by me.
I want to write for a living. I want to tell stories. Since I don't write stories that bore me, I don't have a problem getting them down. I like seeing a piece evolve and solving problems, so I like editing.
Thirteenth King  's avatar

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I find my motivation in the sharing of my work.

As Icehawk, I want to write for a living. I want to be able to teach the creative process to others as well.
Goddess Rukus's avatar

Omnipresent Shapeshifter

The potential for readership keeps me writing, but I begin because there's a scene playing over in my head that won't leave me alone.
Sir Icehawk
I want to write for a living. I want to tell stories. Since I don't write stories that bore me, I don't have a problem getting them down. I like seeing a piece evolve and solving problems, so I like editing.
I see...So how about this: have you considered that the numbers of readers are dropping every year?

See, my writings would be targeted to teens, such as myself. Though, it is the teenagers that are the majority of the drop in readers. People these days, especially teenagers just have no motivation to read anything for their own pleasure.

Now, don't get me wrong, I love to write, and I don't mind doing it, even if it's just for myself to read or another person. But seeing as to how my generation is growing, I don't think selling and publishing my stories will be a safe idea to stand by.

Knowing that factor, my desire to write my stories have slowly been diminishing. Ideas are getting harder and harder to come across, and my visualization of my own stories are slowly fading away. Perhaps it is just me growing older, or just a lot of stress, but lately, my motivation to write is slow. I hope I come to some kind of conclusion that will jump start me back up to write more

(Which is why I came back to Gaia after a few months to look around a bit in the Writers forum)
marshmallowcreampie's avatar

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Stories and characters come naturally to me, I write to get it out of my system.

That, and I enjoy reading but can't always find what I want in books. For example, I love fantasy, but it's not always easy to find variety. A lot of them take place in similar settings with similar creatures and have similar plots. If no one else is going to write what I want to see, then I guess it's up to me.
The number of readers is dropping? The sky is falling. No one reads books anymore. It's all going to be talkies and moving picture shows. This type of stuff has been said for years. It's getting easier to read if anything and that'll grow the base.

Still, it has no affect on my desire to write. I write for me first. I edit to make it something others might enjoy. If it's a million or one reader, I'm fine with it.
hyper zero_99's avatar

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I like to read. I agree w/ MCP (marshmallowcreampie) that I write mostly to get things out of my head.
Hmm. I'm not sure if I agree or not with saying "It's getting easier to read" but I guess an opinion is an opinion. That is not a topic up for debate for this section in the forum. But another reason I see that really diminishes my motive is; like I said before, the readers. I don't exactly know how to get people to read my stories.

For my friends and family who read my stories, sure they say it's great and all, but that kind of critique isn't helpful. Since they are close to my, I don't know if it's just them being kind and all, so I don't know if I'm getting real feedback.

And for the readers online, I never know if they are actually reading the story or not. For all I know, they could just be skimming for mistakes, or saying random words encouragement such as "Really nice!" or "I liked it a lot. You should make more!"

Just by me saying that, means I'm really self-conscious, and that may just be my fault, and there's nothing I can do to help it, but to continue to improve my stories.

The only time I've ever posted a story online was a fan-fiction for a game I play called League of Legends, and that got more views and comments compared to my original stories which are the ones that I want people to read instead.

Of course I can't choose what people want to read or not, but it's just a small thing that's been bugging me, and I'm just here to let out all my thoughts. sweatdrop


Oh! And as for the other two people: I also started for that same reason! When I was about ten years old, I started off by changing scenario of movies I would watch and change how it would end by adding characters, or changing the plot. After that, I began to think up my own scenario which grew into entire story lines. By the time I was twelves, I had so much ideas, that I wanted to get them all down on paper so I wouldn't forget them. It was probably then when I had the height of my motivation to write.
Visual character designs motivate me to write. Like, I can look at someone's character and think "Is there a reason why his shirt is red?" or "I wonder why that robot is missing a screw right there." etc.

I always design my characters before I start writing them. Even though I know the design will change as I write, it always provides the spark.
DJ War Machine
Hmm. I'm not sure if I agree or not with saying "It's getting easier to read" but I guess an opinion is an opinion. That is not a topic up for debate for this section in the forum. But another reason I see that really diminishes my motive is; like I said before, the readers. I don't exactly know how to get people to read my stories.

For my friends and family who read my stories, sure they say it's great and all, but that kind of critique isn't helpful. Since they are close to my, I don't know if it's just them being kind and all, so I don't know if I'm getting real feedback.

And for the readers online, I never know if they are actually reading the story or not. For all I know, they could just be skimming for mistakes, or saying random words encouragement such as "Really nice!" or "I liked it a lot. You should make more!"

Just by me saying that, means I'm really self-conscious, and that may just be my fault, and there's nothing I can do to help it, but to continue to improve my stories.

The only time I've ever posted a story online was a fan-fiction for a game I play called League of Legends, and that got more views and comments compared to my original stories which are the ones that I want people to read instead.

Of course I can't choose what people want to read or not, but it's just a small thing that's been bugging me, and I'm just here to let out all my thoughts. sweatdrop


Oh! And as for the other two people: I also started for that same reason! When I was about ten years old, I started off by changing scenario of movies I would watch and change how it would end by adding characters, or changing the plot. After that, I began to think up my own scenario which grew into entire story lines. By the time I was twelves, I had so much ideas, that I wanted to get them all down on paper so I wouldn't forget them. It was probably then when I had the height of my motivation to write.


Aside from kicking myself in the arse for not working on my story today when I have the day off and Wednesday and Thursday are taken by a holiday, I've never really had a problem with motivation for writing.

That being said, let me clue you in. There will always be people who do and don't like your stories. If you flip-flip between what groups of people want to read, you're not really going to make a good story. Also, teenagers have never really been into reading because they're young and energetic. Writers who write stories for teens appeal to a certain group who are more intelligent than adventurous and outgoing. Those teenagers read books. Sure, maybe so do others, but it has to be an interesting book, one with which they can connect and relate.

Stephen King mentioned in his book, On Writing (I had the book, but lost it. crying ) that though the writer has a responsibility to his/her editor and to his/her audience, the writer has the most responsibility to himself/herself. Maybe other people don't like your stories. Fine. Every story needs some tweaking after the first five drafts (or at least mine do). You're not always gonna nail it on the head. That being said, look at the responsibility you have to yourself first. If you want to make a living off of writing (or don't) this is still most important. You can add and edit for the audience and the editor later. Other than that, don't worry about your readership. That will come with time.

I think someone mentioned it before... if something as stupid, amateurish, and ill-written as Twilight can get published and popular (let's not even bring up Fifty Shades of s**t...Porn... Grey) (mainly because it appeals to that crowd of idiot girls who drool over boys they "love" and wish the boys would in turn stalk them), then something that appeals to you (and believe me there's a whole group of people in the world who have similar interests) I'm sure you'll be able to publish something and have a decent readership.

Let me also bring this up. If you've only posted one story online, that fanfiction you were talking about, how can you compare it to stories you haven't posted online? That's not really a level playing field. Post your others as well or don't bother comparing them when they have a completely different readership.

As far as friends and family, don't trust them. Unless you can tell when they're just being nice, you can't get a good review out of them. Either take it to an editor or have other people who don't know you read it (like in the Writer's Forum) and ask for criticism. Warning: We will give you criticism and it will not always be nice. Usually it's constructive.

Finally, I have to say stop whining. This is a difficult occupation. It's going to be very, very harsh. It's going to be a killer time for anyone to get into the big leagues as far as writers go and it'll be even harder to stay there. You aren't going to get there by whining about the number of readers going down. You aren't going to get there by saying you're getting bad reviews and you aren't going to get there by being self-conscious about your work.

I will admit it right now; I'm not extraordinarily secure in my own work. I ALMOST NEVER approve of anything I write and I constantly worry about whether or not I can make it better or twist something a little more to make it just a little more tempting to read. I am always worrying about avoiding cliches. It kinda plays into making me a better writer, but in the long run, it'll make it to where I won't be able to finish anything. When publishing work, one has to keep the readers interested and taking too long to finish a sequel will definitely diminish the interest of the readership. That is my fault as a writer.

Being a great writer means jumping a million obstacles both without and within you, making a million friends, making a million enemies, breaking your mind and body to push as hard as you can to make the best of the worst situations and creating, REALLY CREATING, something which will inspire or frighten or entertain your readers.

Think of it this way. How badly do you want it?

That is your motivation.
Tenshi Yaminade
DJ War Machine
Hmm. I'm not sure if I agree or not with saying "It's getting easier to read" but I guess an opinion is an opinion. That is not a topic up for debate for this section in the forum. But another reason I see that really diminishes my motive is; like I said before, the readers. I don't exactly know how to get people to read my stories.

For my friends and family who read my stories, sure they say it's great and all, but that kind of critique isn't helpful. Since they are close to my, I don't know if it's just them being kind and all, so I don't know if I'm getting real feedback.

And for the readers online, I never know if they are actually reading the story or not. For all I know, they could just be skimming for mistakes, or saying random words encouragement such as "Really nice!" or "I liked it a lot. You should make more!"

Just by me saying that, means I'm really self-conscious, and that may just be my fault, and there's nothing I can do to help it, but to continue to improve my stories.

The only time I've ever posted a story online was a fan-fiction for a game I play called League of Legends, and that got more views and comments compared to my original stories which are the ones that I want people to read instead.

Of course I can't choose what people want to read or not, but it's just a small thing that's been bugging me, and I'm just here to let out all my thoughts. sweatdrop


Oh! And as for the other two people: I also started for that same reason! When I was about ten years old, I started off by changing scenario of movies I would watch and change how it would end by adding characters, or changing the plot. After that, I began to think up my own scenario which grew into entire story lines. By the time I was twelves, I had so much ideas, that I wanted to get them all down on paper so I wouldn't forget them. It was probably then when I had the height of my motivation to write.


Aside from kicking myself in the arse for not working on my story today when I have the day off and Wednesday and Thursday are taken by a holiday, I've never really had a problem with motivation for writing.

That being said, let me clue you in. There will always be people who do and don't like your stories. If you flip-flip between what groups of people want to read, you're not really going to make a good story. Also, teenagers have never really been into reading because they're young and energetic. Writers who write stories for teens appeal to a certain group who are more intelligent than adventurous and outgoing. Those teenagers read books. Sure, maybe so do others, but it has to be an interesting book, one with which they can connect and relate.

Stephen King mentioned in his book, On Writing (I had the book, but lost it. crying ) that though the writer has a responsibility to his/her editor and to his/her audience, the writer has the most responsibility to himself/herself. Maybe other people don't like your stories. Fine. Every story needs some tweaking after the first five drafts (or at least mine do). You're not always gonna nail it on the head. That being said, look at the responsibility you have to yourself first. If you want to make a living off of writing (or don't) this is still most important. You can add and edit for the audience and the editor later. Other than that, don't worry about your readership. That will come with time.

I think someone mentioned it before... if something as stupid, amateurish, and ill-written as Twilight can get published and popular (let's not even bring up Fifty Shades of s**t...Porn... Grey) (mainly because it appeals to that crowd of idiot girls who drool over boys they "love" and wish the boys would in turn stalk them), then something that appeals to you (and believe me there's a whole group of people in the world who have similar interests) I'm sure you'll be able to publish something and have a decent readership.

Let me also bring this up. If you've only posted one story online, that fanfiction you were talking about, how can you compare it to stories you haven't posted online? That's not really a level playing field. Post your others as well or don't bother comparing them when they have a completely different readership.

As far as friends and family, don't trust them. Unless you can tell when they're just being nice, you can't get a good review out of them. Either take it to an editor or have other people who don't know you read it (like in the Writer's Forum) and ask for criticism. Warning: We will give you criticism and it will not always be nice. Usually it's constructive.

Finally, I have to say stop whining. This is a difficult occupation. It's going to be very, very harsh. It's going to be a killer time for anyone to get into the big leagues as far as writers go and it'll be even harder to stay there. You aren't going to get there by whining about the number of readers going down. You aren't going to get there by saying you're getting bad reviews and you aren't going to get there by being self-conscious about your work.

I will admit it right now; I'm not extraordinarily secure in my own work. I ALMOST NEVER approve of anything I write and I constantly worry about whether or not I can make it better or twist something a little more to make it just a little more tempting to read. I am always worrying about avoiding cliches. It kinda plays into making me a better writer, but in the long run, it'll make it to where I won't be able to finish anything. When publishing work, one has to keep the readers interested and taking too long to finish a sequel will definitely diminish the interest of the readership. That is my fault as a writer.

Being a great writer means jumping a million obstacles both without and within you, making a million friends, making a million enemies, breaking your mind and body to push as hard as you can to make the best of the worst situations and creating, REALLY CREATING, something which will inspire or frighten or entertain your readers.

Think of it this way. How badly do you want it?

That is your motivation.


Thank you for this. If feel as if you have spoken directly towards me. I appreciated the time it took for you to get this message out to me. It also pulled me with the little side humor you added , but in all seriousness, I do understand. I will take this knowledge and continue my writing.
DJ War Machine


You're welcome. ^_^
I write because I'm a high school student who finds high school very boring.

I write during the bulk of my classes, just to pass time when I don't actually have to pay attention to what the teacher is saying.

In a way it's kinda like doodling, but better because most of my teachers assume I'm taking notes instead of spacing off.
Deadlines. I work well under stress.
At the moment, uni work is making want to do anything but write essays. Including work. In fact, riding on the wave of my procrastination, I've managed to get my prologue and two chapters edited.

Other times, it's the thought of having it finished that gets me working. And like Sir Icehawk said, since I'd also like to write full time, and I enjoy the stories I write, I have no issue with just getting my butt in the seat and working.

For me it's not about the flash of inspiration, or muse, or not having whatever 'writer's block' is. It's about perseverance and self-discipline. That's really all it takes.

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