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the_weeping_dalek
This might sound crazy, but some of the best advice I've received about writing was from Cracked.com. (Seriously!!!) Said advice was to research the hell out of what you're writing about--YES, even if it's fiction.


I was always more of a M(ind)AD kid myself, although I collected everything.

¿Fiction?
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I don't know if this will remove writer's block or not but it sounds like something fun to do. I say sounds because I haven't tried it yet. I want somebody else to do it first and then tell us what happened in case it is something gravely dangerous.

You can get "in character" about one of the characters in your book and go out and walk around and interact with people. Not on the internet, on the other world. Don't tell them you are acting like the character in your novel, just be yourself, as you would normally be, but remember you are on character, i mean in character, so don't allow your emotions or fear of your weaknesses or petty addictions to interrupt the excericse...

Better yet if your character is a writer or meets a writer that has writer's block and decides he wants to become a writer too, and then gets writers block.

Then, the character, which by now is a writer with writer's block, which will be easy to enacht because you are a writer, supposedly, creates a character and gets IN THAT character, but remains in the same old world.

That should create a wormhole right there if you don't screw up
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Inosab
I don't know if this will remove writer's block or not but it sounds like something fun to do. I say sounds because I haven't tried it yet. I want somebody else to do it first and then tell us what happened in case it is something gravely dangerous.

You can get "in character" about one of the characters in your book and go out and walk around and interact with people. Not on the internet, on the other world. Don't tell them you are acting like the character in your novel, just be yourself, as you would normally be, but remember you are on character, i mean in character, so don't allow your emotions or fear of your weaknesses or petty addictions to interrupt the excericse...

Better yet if your character is a writer or meets a writer that has writer's block and decides he wants to become a writer too, and then gets writers block.

Then, the character, which by now is a writer with writer's block, which will be easy to enacht because you are a writer, supposedly, creates a character and gets IN THAT character, but remains in the same old world.

That should create a wormhole right there if you don't screw up


Now this is a really fascinating idea, and one that I might try some day.

People should exercise great caution with this, though. It seems like the scope of characters you could analyze using this method would be rather limited due to the obvious problem with acting out a character who is violent, extremely disruptive or hateful.

That can harm other people and can harm yourself, too, because you never know when you're going to encounter someone who just needed one straw on the camel's back to completely lose their s**t on you.

Anyways, I hope anyone who tries this will post here sharing their results. I'd be interested to see whether or not this is helpful.
the_weeping_dalek's avatar

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Inosab
the_weeping_dalek
This might sound crazy, but some of the best advice I've received about writing was from Cracked.com. (Seriously!!!) Said advice was to research the hell out of what you're writing about--YES, even if it's fiction.


I was always more of a M(ind)AD kid myself, although I collected everything.

¿Fiction?


Even fantasy worlds have a basis in reality, no matter how skewed that basis is. Even made-up languages have roots in existing languages--the patterns and inflections, etc. And if you're writing realistic fiction or sci-fi, doing the research is especially important. I got inspiration for one of the most terrifying areas of my WIP's world from doing research on something mentioned in an article that popped up on my FB feed one day.
radioactive alchemist
Breaking the Block Part 1

Advice, Tips, and Tricks



Get Out of the House

  • Get out of the house! Go for a walk, a bike ride, or a drive.

  • Go hang out with friends and forget about writing for awhile.

  • Go to the most boring place you can find so you are forced to entertain yourself.

  • Physical activity gets the creative juices flowing. Lift weights, go for a swim, do some gardening.

  • Go fishing.

  • Go outside and watch the clouds.

  • Go on a shopping spree or, if you don't have money, just window shop.

  • Go to the mall and watch people. What might their lives be like? Write about them.
    thank you so much. this helps alot

  • Go out once a month and write under the full moon.

  • Sit outside on the porch as a thunderstorm is moving in.

  • Go to a museum.



Take a Break and Relax

  • Have a cup of hot tea, hot chocolate, coffee, or, if you're old enough, a stiff drink.

  • Take a bath or a shower, and change clothes. Give yourself a 'clean' start.

  • Light some candles.

  • Take a nap.

  • Go back and read through old stories that you've written.

  • If you've kept diaries or journals in the past, dig them out and read through them.

  • Talk out loud to yourself.

  • Play a game. Board game, video game, card game, it doesn't matter.

  • See a movie you haven't seen or read a book you haven't read.

  • Mindless chores allow your mind to wander. Do the dishes, do the laundry, clean your room, vacuum, whatever.

  • Turn the lights off and sit in the dark. Put some music on, or just enjoy the quiet.

  • Hold a conversation with a stuffed animal or a pet.

  • Pick up a magazine. You don't even need to read it, just look at the pictures.

  • Try vacuuming your lungs.



Change Your Habits

  • Always keep a notebook with you. This way, if the inspiration strikes it won't get away.

  • If you write on paper, try going out and buying a new notebook or a new pen or pencil.

  • If you always write on paper, try the computer--or vice versa.

  • Write something in a genre you haven't tried before.

  • Start keeping a daily journal.

  • Get into the habit of writing every day. Set a daily word goal, be it 100 or 1,000.

  • Draw, even if you're no good at drawing.

  • If you usually write in the daytime, try writing at night--or vice versa.

  • Try staying up late. Some people find that lack of sleep leads to inspiration in the early morning hours.

  • If you can remember your dreams, draw your inspiration from them. Keep a notebook by your bed so you can write them down right away, before you forget.

  • Listen to music. Depending on how you write, you can either jam to your favorite tunes or find something lyricless--classical music is always good, or game soundtracks.



Do Some Writing Exercises or Write Something Else

  • Freewrite. Sit down in front of your computer and type whatever comes to mind. Cover your screen so you're not worrying about spelling and grammar.

  • Type from your favorite book until you think of something of your own to write.

  • Type up the first page from a book. Now continue the story. When you're done, go edit the beginning so it's entirely yours.

  • Make a "mind map" of the five senses for the present moment. What do you hear? Smell? See? Feel? Taste? Do this in different places.

  • Write about having writer's block.

  • Work on a fanfic until you come up with something original.

  • Think about how someone who is drunk would tell a story, and write the story using that voice--slurs, grammar errors, the works.

  • Read a book. Now, strip it down to the bare plot and imagine how you would have wrote it. (Ex.: A boy finds out he is a wizard and goes off to learn magic / Harry Potter).

  • Find a song with interesting lyrics or one that tells a story, and write about it.

  • Pick a letter of the alphabet and write down the first ten words that come to mind. Now pick the word that seems the most interesting, and write about it for 5-10 minutes straight. Then pick the least interesting word, and do the same.

  • Write something small, like a poem.

  • Get on the internet and go to Google's Image search. Type in the first thing that comes to mind, and look at the pictures that come up. Pick one and write about it.

  • Get a dictionary and open it to a random page. Then close your eyes and put your finger down on the page. Write about that word.

  • Use reverse psychology. If you didn't have writer's block, what would you write about?

  • Find an online writer's forum and join a round-robin story.

  • Join a roleplaying group.

  • Write something silly, something that makes no sense whatsoever.

  • Write a parody of a book or movie you don't like, or MST them.

  • Think about your childhood, and the games you used to play and stories you used to make up with your friends. Write about them.

  • If you find yourself losing interest in the story you're working on, work on something else.

  • Cut up a sheet of paper, write a random word on each piece (or get someone else to write them), put them in a hat and draw one out. Now write about what the word brings to mind.

  • Write about what you're doing at the moment, your pen scratching words on the paper or your fingers tapping away at the keys.

  • Think of what you plan to do tomorrow. Now think of what somebody else might be planning to do tomorrow, and write about that.



Think About Your Story Differently

  • Come up with a new situation for your characters. It doesn’t matter if it has nothing to do with the story you intended them for; sometimes you may be able to work the new scene in somewhere.

  • If you're writing something other than realistic fiction, think about the world your characters are in. Come up with some interesting attributes and customs specific to your world.

  • Think about something interesting you want to happen or that you know is going to happen later in the story. How do you want to get there? What needs to happen? If getting to that point isn't motivation enough, write that scene first. Writing interesting and exciting things will make you excited about the story again.

  • Work on subplots, small things that happen that aren't necessarily related to the overall plot.

  • Play out your story in your head like a movie.

  • Have all your characters hold a meeting in your mind.

  • If you're having trouble writing a sad scene, watch a sad movie or think of something sad and have a good cry before you write.

  • Bounce your plot off other people, be they friends or strangers on an internet forum. A fresh point of view can help you fix possible plot holes and suggest new things.

  • Have a conversation with one of your characters.

  • Type out an interview with one of your characters.

  • Consider a new angle. What would the story be like from the antagonist's perspective? If you're writing in 3rd person, how would it sound in 1st person? If already in 1st, how would it sound in 3rd?

  • Take some time and plot out the next scene in some detail. Now, write it.

  • If you're writing something that takes place in a world you created, draw a map of that world.

  • Pick one of your characters. Describe their appearance and clothing in great detail. What does this reveal about them?

  • Take some index cards. Write one major plot point on each, and lay them out. Now fill in the blanks to connect the major points.

  • Do some research on some aspect of the story. Finding out something you didn't know can give you something to add to the story and spur you on.

  • Pick a random, mundane situation such as untangling Christmas lights. How would your character go about doing it? What does this tell you about the character?

  • Where are your characters at location-wise in the story right now? Describe the setting in detail--if they're inside, describe the décor down to the knickknacks on the mantelpiece. If they're outside, what do the buildings look like, what types of trees and plants are growing there? What does this tell you about the world?



Get Some Motivation

  • Promise yourself a reward. If you finish the chapter, you can have your favorite dessert, go see that new movie, or buy that book or game you want.

  • Imagine your book finished, published, and sitting on the bookstore's shelf--and your royalty check in hand. Inspired now?
Inosab
the_weeping_dalek
This might sound crazy, but some of the best advice I've received about writing was from Cracked.com. (Seriously!!!) Said advice was to research the hell out of what you're writing about--YES, even if it's fiction.


I was always more of a M(ind)AD kid myself, although I collected everything.

¿Fiction?


i think i was like that too. i was a weird child xD

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