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Do snakes have the concept of loyalty toward human kind when they are grown and pet by humans from the moment they get born?(the same sense of loyalty that dogs and cats have)

If you and your pet snake would have to fight a bear,would the snake...?
Let's say that one day you and your pet snake encounter a bear in the meadow and none of you can escape the situation(we know we are not faster than a bear is) .Another thing:let's say that we are ignorants about the fact that if we play dead we might escape with life.Given this situation,would your pet snake choose to fight or to run? what if you choose to interfere in the fight between the bear and your pet snake(allegedly that the bear chooses the snake as his first victim),would your pet snake be careful not to bite you by mistake during the fight? would your snake panic and attack you as well?
I'm curious about the loyalty of snakes towards us.Would a snake try to protect us or they would rather choose to defend themselves even if it is at our expense? Do snakes understand concepts of loyalty such as dogs or cats do? stare
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It's a snake, not Krypto the Wonderdog.

Snakes like humans because they provide for their needs regarding warmth, security, food, curiosity, environment, and cleanliness. Domestic snakes owned for years will bite an owner's hand if it smells like food.

Put a snake outside and it'll go where it's most comfortable. It's up to the people to make sure that place is close by and the snake won't be disturbed (by, say, a bear).
Just think about all the work that went into domesticating dogs and them becoming man's best friend. We're talking thousands of years of conditioning.

So yeah, ditto what Ivre said.
All animals can be trained to follow a leader. While i personally never seen a trained snake, i seen a video of a baby riding a komodo dragon.
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All animals can be trained to follow a leader. While i personally never seen a trained snake, i seen a video of a baby riding a komodo dragon.

Not all animals. Snakes may follow sounds or smells, but not a leader. Good luck training geckos. Octopi don't like it when people try. Earthworms? No.

Also, a baby riding a komodo dragon is probably going to end in a dead baby.

Edit: Thanks not loyalty, still. Even if you miraculously train a snake to attack a bear (while you're at it, breed a spherical chicken of uniform density) on cue, he won't do it without the cue.

Also, what kind of snake would defend someone from a bear? Constrictors are slow and event the ones who depend on fast bites are venoumous, which are illegal to own.
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All animals can be trained to follow a leader. While i personally never seen a trained snake, i seen a video of a baby riding a komodo dragon.

Not all animals. Snakes may follow sounds or smells, but not a leader. Good luck training geckos. Octopi don't like it when people try. Earthworms? No.

Also, a baby riding a komodo dragon is probably going to end in a dead baby.

Edit: Thanks not loyalty, still. Even if you miraculously train a snake to attack a bear (while you're at it, breed a spherical chicken of uniform density) on cue, he won't do it without the cue.

Also, what kind of snake would defend someone from a bear? Constrictors are slow and event the ones who depend on fast bites are venoumous, which are illegal to own.

Well i don't know alot about snakes but do they protect their young? what does a baby snake do o.o
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Well i don't know alot about snakes but do they protect their young? what does a baby snake do o.o

At best, they guard they're eggs. Baby snakes slither off and look for something to eat and hope not to be eaten. Snakes have lots of babies, because the latter happens often and the mom does crap about it.

There are exceptions, but the mother only guards the babies until they can slither off, which is a few days after birth and the yolk of the eggs run out. Then the young move out soon and they just become competition for food and mates after that. Most mother snakes just try to make sure the babies can hatch and that's it.
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Dogs are loyal because they've been bred for generations to be that way. Snakes have no concept of loyalty to humans.
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Dogs are loyal because they've been bred for generations to be that way.

They also evolved that way. Cats we had to ******** with the genes of, as they're naturally loners. No clue about rats, ferrets, or octopi.
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I_Write_Ivre
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Dogs are loyal because they've been bred for generations to be that way.

They also evolved that way. Cats we had to ******** with the genes of, as they're naturally loners. No clue about rats, ferrets, or octopi.


Humans didn't intentionally domesticate cats, actually. Around the fertile crescent, some humans invented agriculture, so they started to store food. The food stores attracted mice and other rodents. The local cats learned that where there were humans, there were mice. Cats started to hang around human settlements, and only tolerated humans. Humans just kind of tolerated cats because they got rid of rodents that wouldn't otherwise taken out huge chunks of our food supply. Cats sort of became domesticated on their own, as the cats who were most comfortable around humans could get by with eating the rodents we attracted.
This is probably a better question for the Pets forum, but essentially what others have said is correct; snakes have no concept of loyalty. There may be one or two exceptions (wasn't there a kid who used to sleep with a pet cobra at night?), but a generic snake owner is not going to be able to have the snake come when called or fetch the paper.

I think people over-estimate (or confuse, maybe?) the term 'loyalty' with animals. We tend to their needs and they respond in kind, but stories like Homeward Bound are scarce. Dogs would never be able to be readopted if they were so fiercely loyal to their original owners, cats would never want to go outdoors (since 'master' isn't around to protect and feed them, own the place, etc.), so on.

If you had to fight a bear, there are very few animals that would protect you. Here, at least, they strongly warn against bringing dogs in bear country because the dog will incite the bear and then run past you, leaving you to fight a pissed off bear. There are heroic stories of men saved by dogs from bears (I think there was a husky named Grizzly), but there are just as many of dogs running away.

Likewise, I can think of very few instances where a cat would help you fight a bear.

In most cases with an encounter including a bear, instinct says to run. Even in humans, which is why they try to drill the 'stop and play dead' thing in. It is bigger, more powerful, and very very good at threat display. Bears will eat wolf cubs -- the wolves will bit their haunches and snarl at them, but at the end of the day are powerless to protect their babies. A feral wolf is going to be a lot more powerful against a bear than your golden retriever. Cougars have been recorded fighting bears but again, there are no confirmed instances of a cougar winning in a fight outside of having scared the bear off. Timmy the tabby does not have the advantage of threat display.

In a bizarre world where you managed to breed a 'loyal' snake (maybe imprinted?), it would be just as likely to bite you as the bear. Snakes, especially, rely on movement -- it could not wait to decide whether you were a part of the bear or the owner. The snake would be much more likely to rely on threat display, though, and its possible that alone could scare away a bear; very few animals will mess with snakes and as far as I know, bears aren't one of them (hedgehogs and pigs will, though!). Most animals have a natural aversion to snakes, which is why cats imitate them in their threat displays.

It's possible a snake could be very loving. It's not unheard of for animals to act 'out of character' and adopt certain traits; one story that comes to mind is a snake that's adopted a hamster that was intended as a meal. There's a reason these stories are so rare, though.

If this is in relation to a story, it would probably be easiest to just have the bear be curious, instead of aggressive, and once the snake reacted mean the bear loses interest and wanders off.
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Snakes aren't smart enough to have much loyalty.
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There was a fairly recent article on domestication in National Geographic, which can be found here, and it's worth reading, especially if you're going to explore the interactions between animals and people in writing and not talk out your a**. What I recall is that domestication is a process of genetic selection- intentional or not- and that some species of animals can be domesticated and some can't, but an individual wild animal will never stop being wild, even if it's raised by humans and becomes acclimated to them to some degree.

I don't think that snakes that live with humans are truly domesticated, possibly due in part to the constant introduction of wild snakes into the "domesticated" (probably more like acclimated) population, thus preventing the process of true domestication from taking place. What's more, snakes are not dogs, and they are not people. I don't think we really know if they're completely asocial or not, but they don't experience (and aren't capable of) social relationships as we know them.

The minds of animals don't work like our minds do, and the minds of different species don't work alike. That doesn't mean they're dumb: different animals perform differently on a variety of intelligence tasks, and some are incredibly successful. Not only can octopi be taught to perform fairly complex tasks for a reward, but if the tasks aren't challenging enough, they get bored and start screwing with the scientists.

The thing is, they're incredibly hard to understand. A real comprehensive understanding of how animals think (any animals) just isn't something we have. It's just not part of the wealth of human knowledge. We know some things, but we don't know everything.
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marshmallowcreampie
Dogs are loyal because they've been bred for generations to be that way.

They also evolved that way. Cats we had to ******** with the genes of, as they're naturally loners. No clue about rats, ferrets, or octopi.


Humans didn't intentionally domesticate cats, actually. Around the fertile crescent, some humans invented agriculture, so they started to store food. The food stores attracted mice and other rodents. The local cats learned that where there were humans, there were mice. Cats started to hang around human settlements, and only tolerated humans. Humans just kind of tolerated cats because they got rid of rodents that wouldn't otherwise taken out huge chunks of our food supply. Cats sort of became domesticated on their own, as the cats who were most comfortable around humans could get by with eating the rodents we attracted.


Then, depending on how you look at it, they changed their genes or we did it accidentally. Wild cats--or even barn cats are much more loners or just assholes.
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I_Write_Ivre


Then, depending on how you look at it, they changed their genes or we did it accidentally. Wild cats--or even barn cats are much more loners or just assholes.


Yeah, it was sort of "accidental domestication". Cats that were most comfortable around humans thrived around the human settlements, hence, truly domestic (not tame) cats evolved. Domestication, really, is like evolution, just guided by us.

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