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So I was just surfing the forums, and googling stuff I didnt know what was.. And then I stumbled upon this:

http://www.bonluxat.com/a/Marcel_Wanders_Crochet_Table.html

It is actually a crochet table.. Now I know absolutely nothing about knitting or anything like that, but that table was awesome... And I am thinking, since I have never done anything like it before, it would be kinda cool to try it out.. Just make like a little keep-safe box or something!? Any of you guys have any ideas ?
faolan's avatar

Feral Elder

Ooh, that's pretty... let's see... ah, the materials list: cotton, epoxy resin. The epoxy is basically glue -- very hard, durable glue. Ten to one, the table's made by first crocheting the lace, then fitting it over a mold and coating it with epoxy. Maybe the excess is squeezed out before it hardens, or is sanded off afterward (which, together with the time it would take to crochet in the first place, makes me really wonder what this table would cost!), unless the photo's a little deceptive and it forms a solid surface. Awfully neat, though! I've seen patterns for things like Christmas tree ornaments that are lace that's coated with either epoxy or just regular glue, but this is on a whole nother level!
faolan


wow, you are very observant! Do you think it would be possible to make like a little box? The glue, is it hard to get my hands on? I dont even know how to crochet, but I can always learn it! I just thought the table was sooo pretty 3nodding
faolan's avatar

Feral Elder

BinaNeko
faolan


wow, you are very observant! Do you think it would be possible to make like a little box? The glue, is it hard to get my hands on? I dont even know how to crochet, but I can always learn it! I just thought the table was sooo pretty 3nodding

LOL It really is! You'll probably want to work a few practice projects when you get started before you jump into something complex. But you know, if you jump into lace work like this -- which is done with smaller, steel hooks and thread, instead of the more common aluminum hooks and yarn -- then you'll pretty much be able to crochet anything, no problem. I've hardly finished anything in lace, just because I'm so used to working the larger guages that I get impatient. We have a big tablecloth that my great-grandmother and her sisters crocheted one winter... it makes my head swim and my hands hurt just thinking about it, really!

I'm sure it would be possible, though -- from what I've seen, just regular Elmer's glue would work for a small one, I'd imagine. I haven't tried any of those sorts of patterns myself -- they were mostly for snowflakes, by the way -- but the basic technique was to crochet the shape, then pin it to a piece of cardboard and brush it with Elmer's glue and let it dry overnight. For a little box, you'd probably want to either make each of the sides as separate pieces, set them with glue, then stitch the edges of the dried pieces together. The trick to that would be making sure that the sides fit just right, so it's not lopsided. It can be kind of tough to keep your stitches just the same size. Or you could make it all as one piece, but you'd want to use something solid to set it over to glue it, because it will need to be stretched a bit, and bent pieces of cardboard probably wouldn't hold up to it... an empty Tupperware or something, maybe. Hm. It's an interesting idea, definitely... I might give it a try myself at some point.

Oh, the only thing about Elmer's glue is that it's water-soluble, so if it gets wet, it'll soften. Epoxy's used for several crafts and hobbies, though, too -- if you have a hobby store nearby, chances are they'd have it. If I remember right, it's something you definitely want to use only in a well-ventilated place, and careful what you get it on. When it sets, it's set. xp
faolan


Lmao, thank you so much! I tapped your fishtank for that post! 3nodding
It does sound like ALOT of work tho, I seriously wonder how they did a whole table like that eek

I do want to try crochet tho, so I am gonna visit the hobbystore, but I dont really want it for like tablecloths or anything, that is kinda oldfashioned, but there has to be so much else you can do with it.. Heck, somebody made a TABLE blaugh

Have you done alot of crochet? What have you made?
Glowstick Overdose's avatar

Rainbow Werewolf

I'm ambitious but not quite that ambitious. I think I would just get a clear box made out of glass and put the crochet lace inside. XP Sounds easier to me.
faolan's avatar

Feral Elder

BinaNeko
faolan


Lmao, thank you so much! I tapped your fishtank for that post! 3nodding
It does sound like ALOT of work tho, I seriously wonder how they did a whole table like that eek

I do want to try crochet tho, so I am gonna visit the hobbystore, but I dont really want it for like tablecloths or anything, that is kinda oldfashioned, but there has to be so much else you can do with it.. Heck, somebody made a TABLE blaugh

Have you done alot of crochet? What have you made?

Hehe... old-fashioned, and waaay too time-consuming. o_O But the table... I'm going to guess that it's not thread-guage, it's probably just regular worsted weight cotton, or even thicker, just made in a lace-like style. But that's totally a guess.

Oh, boy... I sell the stuff. Or try to -- tomorrow's market day, but I've got a few photos uploaded, most of them I've done in the last couple months:

User Image User Image User Image User Image
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faolan


Oh man, that purple bunny was aweeesome! Do you sell alot on market day? biggrin
aBlackPie's avatar

Feral Vampire

It might be an idea to get a clear box and crochet around the outside? Like some clear stable perspects. Crocheting around the outside might make it give the illusion there isnt anything holding the crochet square.
faolan's avatar

Feral Elder

BinaNeko
faolan


Oh man, that purple bunny was aweeesome! Do you sell alot on market day? biggrin

Sometimes. I usually do alright, at least. ^_^ Hehe and speaking of -- the purple bunny found a home, too! lol
God-the-almighty's avatar

Enduring Gaian

faolan
Ooh, that's pretty... let's see... ah, the materials list: cotton, epoxy resin. The epoxy is basically glue -- very hard, durable glue. Ten to one, the table's made by first crocheting the lace, then fitting it over a mold and coating it with epoxy. Maybe the excess is squeezed out before it hardens, or is sanded off afterward (which, together with the time it would take to crochet in the first place, makes me really wonder what this table would cost!), unless the photo's a little deceptive and it forms a solid surface. Awfully neat, though! I've seen patterns for things like Christmas tree ornaments that are lace that's coated with either epoxy or just regular glue, but this is on a whole nother level!
My mom used to make the ornaments but she just used starch. They stayed stiff. I agree a table would need something strong.
faolan's avatar

Feral Elder

God-the-almighty
faolan
Ooh, that's pretty... let's see... ah, the materials list: cotton, epoxy resin. The epoxy is basically glue -- very hard, durable glue. Ten to one, the table's made by first crocheting the lace, then fitting it over a mold and coating it with epoxy. Maybe the excess is squeezed out before it hardens, or is sanded off afterward (which, together with the time it would take to crochet in the first place, makes me really wonder what this table would cost!), unless the photo's a little deceptive and it forms a solid surface. Awfully neat, though! I've seen patterns for things like Christmas tree ornaments that are lace that's coated with either epoxy or just regular glue, but this is on a whole nother level!
My mom used to make the ornaments but she just used starch. They stayed stiff. I agree a table would need something strong.

*nods* My mom mentioned that what they used to do with doilies, instead of starching them, was soak them in sugar water after washing, then spread them to dry. The first thing that came to mind when she said that, though, was that they obviously didn't have any ants in the neighborhood. sweatdrop Anyway, though... there could also be environmental factors to take into account. From what I've heard of the Gulf coast, for example (particularly Louisiana), the average humidity is almost high enough to warrant going around in scuba gear. With a climate like that, I wouldn't be surprised if a starch-dried crochet project got a little droopy, y'know? On the other hand, I don't think I've ever heard any specific comments about that, so it might be totally fine.
God-the-almighty's avatar

Enduring Gaian

faolan
God-the-almighty
faolan
Ooh, that's pretty... let's see... ah, the materials list: cotton, epoxy resin. The epoxy is basically glue -- very hard, durable glue. Ten to one, the table's made by first crocheting the lace, then fitting it over a mold and coating it with epoxy. Maybe the excess is squeezed out before it hardens, or is sanded off afterward (which, together with the time it would take to crochet in the first place, makes me really wonder what this table would cost!), unless the photo's a little deceptive and it forms a solid surface. Awfully neat, though! I've seen patterns for things like Christmas tree ornaments that are lace that's coated with either epoxy or just regular glue, but this is on a whole nother level!
My mom used to make the ornaments but she just used starch. They stayed stiff. I agree a table would need something strong.

*nods* My mom mentioned that what they used to do with doilies, instead of starching them, was soak them in sugar water after washing, then spread them to dry. The first thing that came to mind when she said that, though, was that they obviously didn't have any ants in the neighborhood. sweatdrop Anyway, though... there could also be environmental factors to take into account. From what I've heard of the Gulf coast, for example (particularly Louisiana), the average humidity is almost high enough to warrant going around in scuba gear. With a climate like that, I wouldn't be surprised if a starch-dried crochet project got a little droopy, y'know? On the other hand, I don't think I've ever heard any specific comments about that, so it might be totally fine.
We were in Minnesota, the summers tend to be humid but the rest of the year was fairly dry.
faolan's avatar

Feral Elder

God-the-almighty
faolan
God-the-almighty
faolan
Ooh, that's pretty... let's see... ah, the materials list: cotton, epoxy resin. The epoxy is basically glue -- very hard, durable glue. Ten to one, the table's made by first crocheting the lace, then fitting it over a mold and coating it with epoxy. Maybe the excess is squeezed out before it hardens, or is sanded off afterward (which, together with the time it would take to crochet in the first place, makes me really wonder what this table would cost!), unless the photo's a little deceptive and it forms a solid surface. Awfully neat, though! I've seen patterns for things like Christmas tree ornaments that are lace that's coated with either epoxy or just regular glue, but this is on a whole nother level!
My mom used to make the ornaments but she just used starch. They stayed stiff. I agree a table would need something strong.

*nods* My mom mentioned that what they used to do with doilies, instead of starching them, was soak them in sugar water after washing, then spread them to dry. The first thing that came to mind when she said that, though, was that they obviously didn't have any ants in the neighborhood. sweatdrop Anyway, though... there could also be environmental factors to take into account. From what I've heard of the Gulf coast, for example (particularly Louisiana), the average humidity is almost high enough to warrant going around in scuba gear. With a climate like that, I wouldn't be surprised if a starch-dried crochet project got a little droopy, y'know? On the other hand, I don't think I've ever heard any specific comments about that, so it might be totally fine.
We were in Minnesota, the summers tend to be humid but the rest of the year was fairly dry.

Hm. And to think, in Nebraska folks called Minnesota "the cooldest fooking plaece een the wurld"... pot calling the kettle black, if you ask me. Mom went to high school in Louisiana, though, and humid as I remember the midwest summers being, she's said it doesn't come anywhere close. Though I suppose that when the weather is that oppressive, whether the doilies are drooping would be the least of your worries. gonk
God-the-almighty's avatar

Enduring Gaian

faolan
God-the-almighty
faolan
God-the-almighty
faolan
Ooh, that's pretty... let's see... ah, the materials list: cotton, epoxy resin. The epoxy is basically glue -- very hard, durable glue. Ten to one, the table's made by first crocheting the lace, then fitting it over a mold and coating it with epoxy. Maybe the excess is squeezed out before it hardens, or is sanded off afterward (which, together with the time it would take to crochet in the first place, makes me really wonder what this table would cost!), unless the photo's a little deceptive and it forms a solid surface. Awfully neat, though! I've seen patterns for things like Christmas tree ornaments that are lace that's coated with either epoxy or just regular glue, but this is on a whole nother level!
My mom used to make the ornaments but she just used starch. They stayed stiff. I agree a table would need something strong.

*nods* My mom mentioned that what they used to do with doilies, instead of starching them, was soak them in sugar water after washing, then spread them to dry. The first thing that came to mind when she said that, though, was that they obviously didn't have any ants in the neighborhood. sweatdrop Anyway, though... there could also be environmental factors to take into account. From what I've heard of the Gulf coast, for example (particularly Louisiana), the average humidity is almost high enough to warrant going around in scuba gear. With a climate like that, I wouldn't be surprised if a starch-dried crochet project got a little droopy, y'know? On the other hand, I don't think I've ever heard any specific comments about that, so it might be totally fine.
We were in Minnesota, the summers tend to be humid but the rest of the year was fairly dry.

Hm. And to think, in Nebraska folks called Minnesota "the cooldest fooking plaece een the wurld"... pot calling the kettle black, if you ask me. Mom went to high school in Louisiana, though, and humid as I remember the midwest summers being, she's said it doesn't come anywhere close. Though I suppose that when the weather is that oppressive, whether the doilies are drooping would be the least of your worries. gonk
Hah, yeah. Northern Minnesota was cold, especially near the border. In Minneapolis it got below zero in January and February. New your state where I am now is so warm I haven't even had to wear a full coat this winter. It's damp here too. Inside the house is dry though. I hadn't noticed any droopinng doilies.

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