Welcome to Gaia! ::

Song of the Century's avatar

Dapper Dabbler

DXnobodyX
And thats why we dont diagnosis ourselves because you cant be sure your looking at yourself objectively.


Quote:
Non-Suicidal Self Injury



A. In the last year, the individual has, on 5 or more days, engaged in intentional self-inflicted damage to the surface of his or her body, of a sort likely to induce bleeding or bruising or pain (e.g., cutting, burning, stabbing, hitting, excessive rubbing), for purposes not socially sanctioned (e.g., body piercing, tattooing, etc.), but performed with the expectation that the injury will lead to only minor or moderate physical harm. The absence of suicidal intent is either reported by the patient or can be inferred by frequent use of methods that the patient knows, by experience, not to have lethal potential. (When uncertain, code with NOS 2.) The behavior is not of a common and trivial nature, such as picking at a wound or nail biting.


B. The intentional injury is associated with at least 2 of the following:

1. Negative feelings or thoughts, such as depression, anxiety, tension, anger, generalized distress, or self-criticism, occurring in the period immediately prior to the self-injurious act.

2. Prior to engaging in the act, a period of preoccupation with the intended behavior that is difficult to resist.

3. The urge to engage in self-injury occurs frequently, although it might not be acted upon.

4. The activity is engaged in with a purpose; this might be relief from a negative feeling/cognitive state or interpersonal difficulty or induction of a positive feeling state. The patient anticipates these will occur either during or immediately following the self-injury.


C. The behavior and its consequences cause clinically significant distress or impairment in interpersonal, academic, or other important areas of functioning.


D. The behavior does not occur exclusively during states of psychosis, delirium, or intoxication. In individuals with a developmental disorder, the behavior is not part of a pattern of repetitive stereotopies. The behavior cannot be accounted for by another mental or medical disorder (i.e., psychotic disorder, pervasive developmental disorder, mental retardation, Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome).


I do believe that if somebody meets these criteria, it is not hard to correctly self-diagnose unless coupled with one of those additional disorders.

I fit the criteria perfectly: I frequently cut (A), I think about it frequently and do it to relieve negative emotions (B, 1-4), it strongly affects relations with my friends (C), and I am self-aware during the act (D).

I would not say it is as easy to diagnose depression, bipolar disorder, etc. But something that has physical symptoms as well is easier to see.
Song of the Century

I do believe that if somebody meets these criteria, it is not hard to correctly self-diagnose unless coupled with one of those additional disorders.

Until you know about the other disorders or at least even heard of it, how can you be sure you dont have them?
Yet again everything you say is only damn self diagnosis.
Song of the Century's avatar

Dapper Dabbler

DXnobodyX
Until you know about the other disorders or at least even heard of it, how can you be sure you dont have them?
Yet again everything you say is only damn self diagnosis.

I very strongly doubt I match the disorders. I lack psychosis, as there are no hallucinations, changes in reality, etc. I am not delirious as I lack the confusion and sudden mental changes of it. I do not become intoxicated. I can rule out those exceptions to it.

Why so hostile? Some self-diagnoses can be correct, moreso if the person believes they fit the conditions, unless they are a hypochondriac. I would think that a disorder that is based mostly on actions would be easier to diagnose.
Song of the Century

I very strongly doubt I match the disorders. I lack psychosis, as there are no hallucinations, changes in reality, etc. I am not delirious as I lack the confusion and sudden mental changes of it. I do not become intoxicated. I can rule out those exceptions to it.

Oh I dont really care about what you have, I'm just making it clear that self diagnosis is generally inefficient or effectual.

Song of the Century
Why so hostile? Some self-diagnoses can be correct, moreso if the person believes they fit the conditions, unless they are a hypochondriac. I would think that a disorder that is based mostly on actions would be easier to diagnose.

Not really hostile, as yet again I don't really care how ppl hurt themselves. Disorders traditionally and should continue to do so, be diagnosised by a professional with an objective analysis and an understanding of common missconceptions as well as complications. Otherwise the individual is at risk of misconstrewing symptoms, lack of proper testing and insufficient knowledge base to identify and treat any complications.
Song of the Century's avatar

Dapper Dabbler

DXnobodyX
Oh I dont really care about what you have, I'm just making it clear that self diagnosis is generally inefficient or effectual.

Not really hostile, as yet again I don't really care how ppl hurt themselves. Disorders traditionally and should continue to do so, be diagnosised by a professional with an objective analysis and an understanding of common missconceptions as well as complications. Otherwise the individual is at risk of misconstrewing symptoms, lack of proper testing and insufficient knowledge base to identify and treat any complications.

I do agree that a professional to diagnose and help out is nearly always necessary, especially in a case where medication is required.

I'm fine with reasonable self-diagnosis, but not if they're never going to see a therapist, and if they're going to seriously tell someone such as an employer or doctor that they have a disorder, they should get it checked out by a therapist.
Song of the Century
DXnobodyX
Oh I dont really care about what you have, I'm just making it clear that self diagnosis is generally inefficient or effectual.

Not really hostile, as yet again I don't really care how ppl hurt themselves. Disorders traditionally and should continue to do so, be diagnosised by a professional with an objective analysis and an understanding of common missconceptions as well as complications. Otherwise the individual is at risk of misconstrewing symptoms, lack of proper testing and insufficient knowledge base to identify and treat any complications.

I do agree that a professional to diagnose and help out is nearly always necessary, especially in a case where medication is required.

I'm fine with reasonable self-diagnosis, but not if they're never going to see a therapist, and if they're going to seriously tell someone such as an employer or doctor that they have a disorder, they should get it checked out by a therapist.

So your not really advocating reasonable self diagnosis, your advocating knowing when your suffering.
Song of the Century's avatar

Dapper Dabbler

DXnobodyX
So your not really advocating reasonable self diagnosis, your advocating knowing when your suffering.

Reasonable self-diagnosis if it is not going to be used professionally. Such as telling friends and such, and perhaps getting used to having the "title," if you wish to call it that. I would not suggest self-medicating.
Song of the Century
DXnobodyX
So your not really advocating reasonable self diagnosis, your advocating knowing when your suffering.

Reasonable self-diagnosis if it is not going to be used professionally. Such as telling friends and such, and perhaps getting used to having the "title," if you wish to call it that. I would not suggest self-medicating.

Word of caution, dont go saying that to a psychologist.
Song of the Century's avatar

Dapper Dabbler

DXnobodyX
Word of caution, dont go saying that to a psychologist.

I'm not talking about flaunting it, but if speaking to a friend seeking support, for example, it would work to give it a label.
Song of the Century
DXnobodyX
Word of caution, dont go saying that to a psychologist.

I'm not talking about flaunting it, but if speaking to a friend seeking support, for example, it would work to give it a label.

Eh my point still stands.
LotusDraconis's avatar

Dapper Smoker

3,800 Points
  • Risky Lifestyle 100
  • Tycoon 200
  • Person of Interest 200
Finnegans Wake
I feel that I meet the diagnosis standards for schizophrenia, as according to the DSM-IV, and I would likely be clinically diagnosed if I saw a therapist.

Has anyone here ever diagnosed himself with a mental disorder? If so, what was it, and why? Do you have any thoughts on self-diagnosis?


Due to numerous extreme situations that I had been placed in as a small child, I have diagnosed myself with Post traumatic Stress Disorder. Now, if the DSM V which is to be released come 2013-2014 has the diagnosis of Complex PTSD, that, most definitely would be the one that I would be under the demographic of.

The reason that I did this self-diagnosis was to find ways to stop the nightmares, the flashbacks and pretty much, to try to be normal again, but because I have had PTSD since I was 5 years old, there is no normal to go back to, so... if anything, at this point, its just to deal with the nightmares and flashbacks... those things are no f*cking joke.

Self-diagnosis can be very helpful as well as very destructive. Make sure that you read the criteron carefully and that you aren't looking for another means of attention. Mental illness gets kids taken from their families because Child Protection Services will think that there is a safety issue based SOLELY on the fact that you "have a mental illness".

BE CAREFUL.
Yes. I have diagnosed myself many a time over the last so and so years, for various reasons I care not to put in detail.

I do believe that self-diagnosing can in many cases be harmful. There was a point where I was obsessed with figuring out why I think the way I do, and every time I felt physically or mentally "strange" I would look something up.

I'm not a doctor/therapist/psychiatrist, or what have you, so I realize that my investigations are likely at fault, and I eventually left it at that. But before, the self-diagnosis merely brought me paranoia and made me feel more insane, in lack of better wording. Not very favorable.
I have diagnosed myself with a few things (disthymia, anorexia/ED-NOS because my weight was sometimes over the line and my menstrual status couldn't be established, and Asperger's syndrome), all of which have now been confirmed by professionals. The way the DSM IV TR criteria are set up, I think if someone is looking and finds that they actually meet the criteria (rather than just going through the list of symptoms and seeing that they have some of them), then there's a good chance they have the disorder. This can be useful for self-advocacy and seeking help, even if they aren't in a position to get a formal diagnosis.
MendoGurl's avatar

6,700 Points
  • Forum Explorer 100
  • Conversationalist 100
  • Forum Sophomore 300
diagnosing yourself with a disorder is that a drug addict saying its ok to be a mess.
Even if you are correct, someone else with the credencials to diagnose any disorder is the only way to do.
but why do that? do you want something wrong with you? do you want an excuse for the way you act? there are questions that need answers that can only be answered by a therapist, not you.
Yep. I had self diagnosed myself with a number of things.

Because a lot of my family and friends have legitimate diagnosis, I went through middle school and high school thinking that in order to be healthy, I needed to "find out what was wrong with me." Which turns out to be a bad thing to think when you are, in fact, mostly sane.

So yeah. Don't do what I did, kids. All you end up with is a prozac prescription that makes you feel like a zombie and fail half your classes.

*thumbs up*

Quick Reply

Submit
Manage Your Items
Other Stuff
Get GCash
Offers
Get Items
More Items
Where Everyone Hangs Out
Other Community Areas
Virtual Spaces
Fun Stuff
Gaia's Games