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THeSLuSH
Did you know that soon there will no longer be a diagnosis for Aspergers?
You may want to check the proposed revisions to the upcoming DSM-5 (can be found on the APA website).
So, I would be considered "normal" if such a revision is made? BS.


Or they'll diagnose us with ADHD, or something...
THeSLuSH's avatar

Sparkly Lunatic

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THeSLuSH
Did you know that soon there will no longer be a diagnosis for Aspergers?
You may want to check the proposed revisions to the upcoming DSM-5 (can be found on the APA website).
So, I would be considered "normal" if such a revision is made? BS.


Or they'll diagnose us with ADHD, or something...


That I doubt.
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I've never been officially diagnosed, and I don't want to be. I've got enough mental issues going on without having another label slapped on me.

That said, I've almost certainly got some form of Asperger's. I have always approached social situations as an anthropologist might: What are the rules here? What guidelines of conduct apply? and, most important and critical: How do I get out of this with a minimum of embarrassment? Stuff that everyone else seemed to know as a matter of course, like how to talk to other people, how to interact, how loud to laugh, what gestures and facial expressions were appropriate, I had to learn by careful observation and a hefty dose of trial and error.

I've mostly figured things out now - mostly. I've gotten enough experience that I've got a rough script covering most of the situations I typically find myself in, so I know what to say and do so that it seems natural. Still feels like a foreign language sometimes, though, but I'm getting more fluent.
xXZirkannia's avatar

Interesting Citizen

In his youth, my fiance was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome. Apparently it was worse when he was younger, but I couldn't really tell until he told me about it.
He has a slight stutter, gets EXTREMELY focused on small tasks, can talk for hours about the same subject and completely avoid getting off-track, and is very well studied in random things. He's also terrible at reading body language of others and often pushes things too far, but I figured that was just a guy thing. /shrug. Aside from that, he sounds extremely serious when he's "joking," and although he's good at handling changes, he does push to try and keep things running as they should.
Like I said though, it's hard to tell sometimes and he's capable of behaving normally, and he denies having it, but it does explain some of his behavior.
K i n g X u m o t - XVI's avatar

Thankful Lover

THeSLuSH
Did you know that soon there will no longer be a diagnosis for Aspergers?

Actually, that is false.
They are simply moving Asperger's into the spectrum of Autism.
As it is right now, it's a separate illness.
All they will do is make categorical changes.
It will still exist.
THeSLuSH's avatar

Sparkly Lunatic

K i n g X u m o t - XVI

Actually, that is false.
They are simply moving Asperger's into the spectrum of Autism.
As it is right now, it's a separate illness.
All they will do is make categorical changes.
It will still exist.


Actually, you are wrong.
The word Aspergers will be removed from the DSM.
K i n g X u m o t - XVI's avatar

Thankful Lover

THeSLuSH

If you want to take the time and read it, then by all means.
DSM-V
THeSLuSH's avatar

Sparkly Lunatic

K i n g X u m o t - XVI
THeSLuSH

If you want to take the time and read it, then by all means.
DSM-V


I have read that, it is just a string of suggestions and open comments by researchers.
Did you happen to see the proposed revisions before they were taken down?
Aspergers will no longer be recognized in the DSM as a disorder, because of how close HFA and AD are in diagnostic criteria. There will be three levels of autism, which vary by severity. ASD Level 1, ASD Level 2, and ASD Level 3. And hence, no more Aspergers.
THeSLuSH's avatar

Sparkly Lunatic

Also, the page you are citing is from 2008 ... before the discussion of DSM 5 began in 2010.
K i n g X u m o t - XVI's avatar

Thankful Lover

THeSLuSH
K i n g X u m o t - XVI
THeSLuSH

If you want to take the time and read it, then by all means.
DSM-V


I have read that, it is just a string of suggestions and open comments by researchers.
Did you happen to see the proposed revisions before they were taken down?
Aspergers will no longer be recognized in the DSM as a disorder, because of how close HFA and AD are in diagnostic criteria. There will be three levels of autism, which vary by severity. ASD Level 1, ASD Level 2, and ASD Level 3. And hence, no more Aspergers.

I have, but this is were it gets confusing.
My psychology professor (who knows all about the DSM) said it would still be in there just not as a separate disorder as I said earlier.
The name won't stick around but it will still exist under the new spectrum.
THeSLuSH's avatar

Sparkly Lunatic

K i n g X u m o t - XVI

I have, but this is were it gets confusing.
My psychology professor (who knows all about the DSM) said it would still be in there just not as a separate disorder as I said earlier.
The name won't stick around but it will still exist under the new spectrum.


I think that what your psyc professor meant was that those that are currently diagnosed with Aspergers, and those that would be diagnosed with Aspergers will still be diagnosed as autistic, which is true. There will just no longer be the term for Aspergers recognized in the DSM and hence, no 'Aspergers' diagnosis.

To show my credibility I am a grad student in a cognitive and brain sciences department and one of the labs (although not my own) does neuropsychological research on autistic brains, and their work may be directly affected by the DSM changes. I have been taking an autism grad seminar and my conclusions about the new DSM come from discussions with a major autism researcher.
I was diagnosed with aspergers in the second grade. I was always different. I was always being made fun of or tried to hard to make friends just because I was different. I'm still shy today to talk in front of people; mostly because I stutter when I speak and here nobody understands what it is so I get strange looks. It causes a lot of anxiety on me and I've been depressed because of it. It's tough being autistic, but I'm getting through it slowly and one step at a time
I am 29 now and was diagnosed with Autism at the age of 14. Computers and cars are my specialty. The abuse I have encountered in 2008 was out of this world by another person with Autism that I had known as a so-called "friend" of 10 years. I only know one person with AS/Autism on here and now I can be friends with alot more. I have been on this site for many years and this is a whole new community I have never heard of.

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