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apparantly, a planet similar to earth is no longer hyped.
Responsive
apparantly, a planet similar to earth is no longer hyped.
Nothing new about it has been discovered. We didn't find it by seeing it directly, we "discovered" that it must exist because of the way it's parent star wobbles. We can extract it's orbit and with information about the sun to figure out what kind of temperatures there would be at it's orbit. We can do some brightness analysis to figure out it's approximate size and it's too small to be a gas planet (if it were the heat would expand it to be larger).

So it's not like we've been watching it and can see things on the surface, and it would be a huge undertaking to even try. I mean, if you want to resolve this planet with the same power that you can observe jupiter with an large immature telescope, you'd need a lens about the size of the earth.

You can kind of cheat and just use several telescopes pointed at the planet that are as far apart as the diameter of the earth, but your image is going to take a long time to form because you take in so much less light. Not to mention this very long exposure would be rather blury due to relative motion.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

You could use meta materials to detect oncoming light and then have an awesome computer for recreations of the surface however...

If something was moving on the surface it really wouldn't matter.


It would be best to send out a beam of light/radiation to said planet and have it come back trying to have it scatter as little as possible and sending out such huge amounts of information but...

Probs won't help : P
Suicidesoldier#1
You could use meta materials to detect oncoming light and then have an awesome computer for recreations of the surface however...

If something was moving on the surface it really wouldn't matter.


It would be best to send out a beam of light/radiation to said planet and have it come back trying to have it scatter as little as possible and sending out such huge amounts of information but...

Probs won't help : P
It won't. The diffraction limit of light isn't something you overcome by making matter materials. If the light of wavelength W passes an aperture smaller than D, you won't be able to resolve features that are separated by angles A or less:

A = asin(1.220W/D)
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

Vannak
Suicidesoldier#1
You could use meta materials to detect oncoming light and then have an awesome computer for recreations of the surface however...

If something was moving on the surface it really wouldn't matter.


It would be best to send out a beam of light/radiation to said planet and have it come back trying to have it scatter as little as possible and sending out such huge amounts of information but...

Probs won't help : P
It won't. The diffraction limit of light isn't something you overcome by making matter materials. If the light of wavelength W passes an aperture smaller than D, you won't be able to resolve features that are separated by angles A or less:

A = asin(1.220W/D)


That's why it's a meta material. xp
Suicidesoldier#1
Vannak
Suicidesoldier#1
You could use meta materials to detect oncoming light and then have an awesome computer for recreations of the surface however...

If something was moving on the surface it really wouldn't matter.


It would be best to send out a beam of light/radiation to said planet and have it come back trying to have it scatter as little as possible and sending out such huge amounts of information but...

Probs won't help : P
It won't. The diffraction limit of light isn't something you overcome by making matter materials. If the light of wavelength W passes an aperture smaller than D, you won't be able to resolve features that are separated by angles A or less:

A = asin(1.220W/D)


That's why it's a meta material. xp
you mean a meta magic material?

The limit has to do with the wave nature of light (This actually applies to wave nature of matter too, like in transmission electron microscopes), not the instrument that detects. Most of these type of limiting calculations are done assuming perfect efficiency, all light is collected, no scattering inside the device, etc etc.

unfortunately it doesn't matter if you project the image onto a block of wood or a super conducting CCD cooled to microkelvin.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

Vannak
Suicidesoldier#1
Vannak
Suicidesoldier#1
You could use meta materials to detect oncoming light and then have an awesome computer for recreations of the surface however...

If something was moving on the surface it really wouldn't matter.


It would be best to send out a beam of light/radiation to said planet and have it come back trying to have it scatter as little as possible and sending out such huge amounts of information but...

Probs won't help : P
It won't. The diffraction limit of light isn't something you overcome by making matter materials. If the light of wavelength W passes an aperture smaller than D, you won't be able to resolve features that are separated by angles A or less:

A = asin(1.220W/D)


That's why it's a meta material. xp
you mean a meta magic material?

The limit has to do with the wave nature of light (This actually applies to wave nature of matter too, like in transmission electron microscopes), not the instrument that detects. Most of these type of limiting calculations are done assuming perfect efficiency, all light is collected, no scattering inside the device, etc etc.

unfortunately it doesn't matter if you project the image onto a block of wood or a super conducting CCD cooled to microkelvin.


Superlens!

Yes, I guess any technology that's sufficiently advanced would appear as magic. xp
Well, the idea was always a bit silly really. We look for life in the goldilocks zone because our Earth is in the goldilocks zone, and is abundant with life. However, any planet in that zone could still be utterly inhospitable. For all we know, life could be more likely in other conditions very alien from what we find on Earth. Science does not yet have access to all the necessary data.
Which Goldilocks planet? They've discovered hundreds. It's no big deal anymore when you find an Earth-like planet.

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