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StellaTheLabMouse's avatar

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Macodrone
Why don't you accept that many cancers have no cure because of cellular oxidation in the elderly and put more effort into treating diseases which are not terminal but affect millions world wide like the various strains of Herpes?

Why don't you believe that these people carry the gene for a reason and if more people who were genetically meant to die DID die than we'd progress as a species instead of trying to cure something which is obviously evolutionary and meant to keep population control.


To be honest, I'm not sure if you're trolling or if you genuinely feel that way. Either way, I'd suggest you ponder on your comments for a second before you voice them in front of those who might take offense.

Oh, and the answers to both of your questions can be found by taking a quick trip through the pediatric cancer ward of your local hospital.

Then, and only then, are you in any position to voice such an opinion on the validity of cancer research.
StellaTheLabMouse
YahuShalum
Does a PH balance effect cancer?


A pH balance of what? Your blood? The cancer cells themselves?

pH balances can be determined all over the body so I can't help you unless I know where (or what) specifically you're referring to.
Any ph balance? What do cancer cells thrive in? What is their ph balance?
A Lost Iguana's avatar

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Macodrone
Why don't you believe that these people carry the gene for a reason and if more people who were genetically meant to die DID die than we'd progress as a species instead of trying to cure something which is obviously evolutionary and meant to keep population control.
Are you suggesting that my friend who was diagnosed with a brain tumor in his mid 20s is meant to die? Cause that's pretty callous. My father got lucky and survived testicular cancer in his early 30s but my girlfriend's mother did not survive her bout with breast cancer in recent years.

As for the thread itself…

When I was in research, the average day involved getting into the office and sitting in front of a computer for the entire day. Hacking away at various bits of Fortran and self-written C++ that modelled how sub-atomic particles would manifest in our experimental apparatus and comparing with actual data. Reading theory papers to be sure that subtle effects are being accounted for correctly and suchlike. Every now and again, I would be required to do a shift working on the experiment itself, either checking the quality of data (looking at control graphs in real-time) or monitoring the functioning of the apparatus and restarting misbehaving machinery.

So, what is the average day like for the lab mouse?
DeepSpaceSlumber's avatar

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So I had (hopefully past tense after two surgeries) Adenocarcinoma in-situ and my oncologist recommended Indole-3-Carbinol to me. My mom bought a bottle of it for me but I was skeptical of taking it to say the least. The science behind it seems fuzzy at best. Do you know anything about this supplement?
I know I just made a topic about this, but I seriously need help emo

Would you be willing to help me identify this?
Monosomy: 22
Trisomy: 1, 2, 7, 11, 13, 14, 18, 20, 21
Tetrasomy: 4, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17
Pentasomy: 6
Missing sets (pair): 3

Normal chromosomes: 4, 8, 12, 19, and X
(This is a girl.)
Total number of chromosomes: 67
StellaTheLabMouse
Ryu Kei Shou Kawazu
StellaTheLabMouse
I work on a specific gene we think causes a certain type of ovarian cancer and, while I've only been in my current lab since February, I've been doing other forms of research for over 4 years now.

Anything you want to know/ask is fair game! ^_^
ever hear of how mice dont have vitamin c gene and they altered alive mice to change their genes to produce vitamin c in their liver? Basically they are testing it on mice first and might use it for humans later since we dont produce c either. Do you know when they will test on humans how long it could take for them to? And how could I get into that to be tested? lol.

i want to know because it caused mice to live 30% longer (for us thats another 20-30 years) and they became athletic overnight basically with their stamina.


Well, it is true that most mammals can't produce their own vitamin C (thus why the sailors of old got scurvy when they traveled overseas for extended lengths of time) and it is also possible to genetically alter a mouse to express that gene when it normally does not.

But, bear in mind that 20-30% longer for a mouse is only an extension of a few weeks, so it's hard to say that a mouse that lives a few extra weeks will mean an extra 20 years for a human. While we are very closely related genetically, results in mice very rarely translate directly into humans.

Either way, genetic experiments, like that one, are used more for research purposes than for clinical applications on people. It's highly unethical to consider altering the genetic make-up of a human. The best we can do with that information is to suggest that consuming a higher intake of Vitamin C may be beneficial for a longer life and higher stamina. But I'm afraid we can't genetically alter your liver at this point. Sorry. ^_^;


Why is it unethical? Shouldn't ethics concern the flourishing of humans? And if such a gene could make us live more, then why not apply it? Messing with nature is the only way we'll evolve from now on ~
Mme Noire's avatar

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StellaTheLabMouse
I work on a specific gene we think causes a certain type of ovarian cancer and, while I've only been in my current lab since February, I've been doing other forms of research for over 4 years now.

Anything you want to know/ask is fair game! ^_^


That's awesome. I did 14 months of research in a lab that deals with women's cancers. I partnered up with an oncology fellow (I'm an undergrad) and helped him with his project on this gene that relates to ovarian cancer and the effect of Carboplatin on it. Experimental therapeutics as they call it.

I loved it. The experience was great. But the work was overwhelming and eventually, I just didn't have time for it anymore. I learned a lot... but going in with only a very partial knowledge of genetics and cell biology, it was challenging. But I still loved it.

So what exactly are you working on?
Hey! I've been hearing various things on the different ways they're hoping to find a cure ranging from snake venom to sound waves. Am I completely off base on this? Which research path (not just those) do you think looks the most promising? Would it be different for different types of cancers or do you think there's a chance of identifying and destroying cancer cells in general. How much time is devoted to preventative research as opposed to researching a cure? Lots of questions all at once. I only know enough about this topic to have questions blaugh
I was wondering if you could tell me how to prevent getting cancer? Almost every magazine talks about foods that prevent cancer, or how often you should get some particular screening test such as a mammogram. But of course there is potential to have conflicting information/opinions out there in the media and on the internet. Where should I get trustworthy information of how to prevent cancer or detect it early?
Avgvsto's avatar

Dapper Reveler

StellaTheLabMouse
I work on a specific gene we think causes a certain type of ovarian cancer and, while I've only been in my current lab since February, I've been doing other forms of research for over 4 years now.

Anything you want to know/ask is fair game! ^_^
I don't really understand cancer at all, where should I start?
Ephemeral_Dream's avatar

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My sister started out having "ovarian cancer" but then the doctors at Mayo discovered it function like colon cancer. How strange.
What level of education background is needed to work in a lab research ? I guess it's a Ph. D. right?
BlackBeltMan's avatar

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How close would you say that your group is to finding a cure/prevention? The same question on a larger scale encompassing all of cancer research etc?

Also, you're awesome!

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