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1upMushroomCloud's avatar

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Now, I know this probably sounds like a question for somewhere else, but this was the only place I knew I could find a reliable and related answer to my question without too much spamming and noobs.

Question is: What exactly are the requirements for U.S. Statehood, anyone know? Thing is, i've googled it several times over but can't figure it out. I'm getting faint hints and ideas but I'd prefer somthing more concrete, Namely being flat out told what it is... I'm thick, I know.

So, if anyone has an answer to my question, (A Genuine answer), i'd appriciate it if you told me.
This might help.

I think that the US Government invites a territory into statehood. The territory then votes on whether to do this or not. Then it goes to Congress, who ratifies it and the territory becomes a part of the union.
1upMushroomCloud's avatar

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ChronoSpark
This might help.

I think that the US Government invites a territory into statehood. The territory then votes on whether to do this or not. Then it goes to Congress, who ratifies it and the territory becomes a part of the union.


I thought "Thick" spelled it out clearly XP.

I don't honestly think I can be expected to read all that and understand it all. I'd really just like someone spelling it out for me, simpler the better.

I've read somthing about needing 60,000 citizens minimum before it can be considered, and it needs a "State" constitution set up, and the proper State Government established and voted upon before it can be considered by Congress, but unfortunately i'm not sure if these are the current official requirements as the records stating them date back to before 1920.
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ChronoSpark
This might help.

I think that the US Government invites a territory into statehood. The territory then votes on whether to do this or not. Then it goes to Congress, who ratifies it and the territory becomes a part of the union.


I thought "Thick" spelled it out clearly XP.

I don't honestly think I can be expected to read all that and understand it all. I'd really just like someone spelling it out for me, simpler the better.

I've read somthing about needing 60,000 citizens minimum before it can be considered, and it needs a "State" constitution set up, and the proper State Government established and voted upon before it can be considered by Congress, but unfortunately i'm not sure if these are the current official requirements as the records stating them date back to before 1920.

I'm not sure of any specifics. That's basically just the documentation for Oklahoma becoming a state, and what was required. Yes, a state constitution has to be set up. But if you're talking about a place like Puerto Rico, they already have a government set up. They have a Governor, for example, so...
Omnileech's avatar

Omnipresent Warlord

1) territory petitions congress
2) Congress passes act authorizing the state to make a constitution. Congress can stipulate things (no polygamy!, etc.)
3) People of territory vote on it.
4) Constitution's sent to congress, they can vote it up or down. If down, it's up to the states to change it.
5) Congress passes statehood legislation.
6) President announces the new state.

I think that's right.
Omnileech
1) territory petitions congress
2) Congress passes act authorizing the state to make a constitution. Congress can stipulate things (no polygamy!, etc.)
3) People of territory vote on it.
4) Constitution's sent to congress, they can vote it up or down. If down, it's up to the states to change it.
5) Congress passes statehood legislation.
6) President announces the new state.

I think that's right.

Sounds about right.
I have a question...
What would we consider what the United States did with Hawaii to make it a state?
Was that a form of annexation?
Or is there some other term that I'm not aware of and I'm just ignorant to this subject?
Omnileech's avatar

Omnipresent Warlord

Forlorn Casuistry
I have a question...
What would we consider what the United States did with Hawaii to make it a state?
Was that a form of annexation?
Or is there some other term that I'm not aware of and I'm just ignorant to this subject?


Yeah, we conquered that one.
Forlorn Casuistry
I have a question...
What would we consider what the United States did with Hawaii to make it a state?
Was that a form of annexation?
Or is there some other term that I'm not aware of and I'm just ignorant to this subject?


When we initially came into posession of Hawii, yes it was more or less annexation. Much like Guam, Puerto Rico, etc. We initially took them by force and they became our terrirtory. Now there is a difference between a state and a territory. By the time we annexed Hawii foreigners outnumbered the natives greatly I think.

So the Natives had lost the island before we officially took it and the new power holders were interested in joining the Union.

I think this bit from wikipedia explains the path to statehood pritty well:

Quote:
Since the establishment of the United States, the number of states has expanded from 13 to 50. The Constitution is rather laconic on the process by which new states can be added, noting only that "New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union", and forbidding a new state to be created out of the territory of an existing state or the merging of two or more states as one without the consent of both Congress and all the state legislatures involved.

In practice, nearly all states admitted to the union after the original thirteen have been formed from U.S. territories (that is, land under the sovereignty of the United States federal government but not part of any state) that were organized (given a measure of self-rule by Congress). Generally speaking, the organized government of a territory would make known the sentiment of its population in favor of statehood; Congress would then direct that government to organize a constitutional convention to write a state constitution. Upon acceptance of that Constitution, Congress would then admit that territory as a state. The broad outlines in this process were established by the Northwest Ordinance, which actually predated the ratification of the Constitution.

However, Congress has ultimate authority over the admission of new states, and is not bound to follow this procedure. A few U.S. states outside of the original 13 have been admitted that were never organized territories of the federal government:

Vermont, an unrecognized but de facto independent republic until its admission in 1791
Kentucky, a part of Virginia until its admission in 1792
Maine, a part of Massachusetts until its admission in 1820 following the Missouri Compromise
Texas, a recognized independent republic until its admission in 1845
California, created as a state (as part of the Compromise of 1850) out of the unorganized territory of the Mexican Cession in 1850 without ever having been a separate organized territory itself
West Virginia, created from areas of Virginia that rejoined the union in 1863, after the 1861 secession of Virginia to the Confederate States of America
Congress is also under no obligation to admit states even in those areas whose population expresses a desire for statehood. For instance, the Republic of Texas requested annexation to the United States in 1836, but fears about the conflict with Mexico that would result delayed admission for nine years. Utah Territory was denied admission to the union as a state for decades because of discomfort with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' dominance in the territory, and particularly with the Mormon elite's then practice of polygamy. Once established, state borders have been largely stable; the only major exceptions are cessions by Maryland and Virginia to create the District of Columbia (Virginia's portion was later returned); a cession by Georgia; expansions by Missouri and Nevada; and Kentucky, Maine, and Tennessee being split from Virginia, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, respectively.
im boreded to death goodnight

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