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Excited for this election?

yeah i am totally going to watch! 0.33333333333333 33.3% [ 7 ]
i could care less! 0.23809523809524 23.8% [ 5 ]
oooo pretty colors! 0.42857142857143 42.9% [ 9 ]
Total Votes:[ 21 ]
1
Here's the thing, this is my first election, i am very excited because i finally get to vote, why i'm voting is that i see a brighter future for America and want to contribute because i want my voice being heard. I am going to be doing a speech in my fundamentals of public speaking class and our next speech is a persuasive speech, so i was like, why not talk about voting, people can make an impact by voting, volunteering to get people who arent registered to vote registered. Right now i am very ecstatic about talking about voting and the fact that i am finally at the age to vote, it's pretty awesome and very much a big deal to my family. My mom, dad, sister and i are all independents who are voting for Barack Obama because of his fresh ideas and new optimistic sense of faith in our country that to be honest i never really gave a s**t about before i turned 18. I first got into politics when i was in my high school government class; it's amazing learning about all the history and the elections in the past years. I used to complain that not very many people volunteered in helping people find a greater sense in America, but now i know that want to help impact other people because it would make me feel good.

My main point im getting to is that i would like some ideas that would be wise to talk about in my persuasion to vote.

so far i have:
being knowledgable - knowing what your voting for, why you are voting for what you are voting for, why you are voting and other things

the fact that if you don't vote, you don't have a reason to complain, and really i have talked to my mom, dad, sister, teachers, and anyone else who knows information about voting and they would say the same thing, you have a right to vote, to have your voice heard, and other things, and instead you don't vote for several reasons, one: you don't care, two: you don't like either candidate running for president and maybe haven't read their policies and don't want to because it's not worth it to you. four: some ask "what's in it for me?", and to be honest, i probably asked myself that question before i could even vote because i didn't really care about the elections and who was president.

So i ask you fellow Americans, can you tell me some ideas i could talk about with the issues of voting.
Voting is your way of keeping the government accountable for its actions.

It means you can tell the incumbents to bugger off when they mess up, and it means you can tell them they've been doing an overall good job when they work well.

Not voting, is just telling the government 'hey, do whatever', it means you're demonstrating a lack of care for the governments actions, and letting them get away with whatever they want to do (you wont stop them, you wont vote them out).
aquarius_horse
Here's the thing, this is my first election, i am very excited because i finally get to vote, why i'm voting is that i see a brighter future for America and want to contribute because i want my voice being heard. I am going to be doing a speech in my fundamentals of public speaking class and our next speech is a persuasive speech, so i was like, why not talk about voting, people can make an impact by voting, volunteering to get people who arent registered to vote registered. Right now i am very ecstatic about talking about voting and the fact that i am finally at the age to vote, it's pretty awesome and very much a big deal to my family. My mom, dad, sister and i are all independents who are voting for Barack Obama because of his fresh ideas and new optimistic sense of faith in our country that to be honest i never really gave a s**t about before i turned 18. I first got into politics when i was in my high school government class; it's amazing learning about all the history and the elections in the past years. I used to complain that not very many people volunteered in helping people find a greater sense in America, but now i know that want to help impact other people because it would make me feel good.

My main point im getting to is that i would like some ideas that would be wise to talk about in my persuasion to vote.

so far i have:
being knowledgable - knowing what your voting for, why you are voting for what you are voting for, why you are voting and other things

the fact that if you don't vote, you don't have a reason to complain, and really i have talked to my mom, dad, sister, teachers, and anyone else who knows information about voting and they would say the same thing, you have a right to vote, to have your voice heard, and other things, and instead you don't vote for several reasons, one: you don't care, two: you don't like either candidate running for president and maybe haven't read their policies and don't want to because it's not worth it to you. four: some ask "what's in it for me?", and to be honest, i probably asked myself that question before i could even vote because i didn't really care about the elections and who was president.

So i ask you fellow Americans, can you tell me some ideas i could talk about with the issues of voting.


Ah, how bright eyed. I miss those days. Your country (Like Canada (mine)), uses the first past the post system, so sadly if you vote for a party, and they don't win in your riding/district, your vote accounts for nothing nationally. I still vote, I just see it as a hallow, and nearly meaningless act.
aquarius_horse
the fact that if you don't vote, you don't have a reason to complain,

And those individuals who cannot make it to the polls because of a myriad of uncontrollable factors, such as work, lack of transportation, and so on? Surely if there is a direct link between voting and the "right to complain", these people likewise should keep their mouths shut.

Voting is, above all, an endorsement of a platform. Even if you vote strategically you are supporting one, for example, lukewarm platform over a worse platform. In one situation, assuming there is something to complain about, you have voiced your opinion but your are part of the group that brought it to power in the first place. In another, you were not a contributing factor to this problem but you forfeited your right to complain through so-called inaction. Is this truly a fair claim to make? Indeed if one feels it is his or her duty to vote responsibly and views the prevailing platforms - including those of available write-in candidates - as irresponsible, it would be well within this person's right to both abstain and voice distaste over its later execution.
Spontaneous Order
aquarius_horse
the fact that if you don't vote, you don't have a reason to complain,

And those individuals who cannot make it to the polls because of a myriad of uncontrollable factors, such as work, lack of transportation, and so on? Surely if there is a direct link between voting and the "right to complain", these people likewise should keep their mouths shut.

Voting is, above all, an endorsement of a platform. Even if you vote strategically you are supporting one, for example, lukewarm platform over a worse platform. In one situation, assuming there is something to complain about, you have voiced your opinion but your are part of the group that brought it to power in the first place. In another, you were not a contributing factor to this problem but you forfeited your right to complain through so-called inaction. Is this truly a fair claim to make? Indeed if one feels it is his or her duty to vote responsibly and views the prevailing platforms - including those of available write-in candidates - as irresponsible, it would be well within this person's right to both abstain and voice distaste over its later execution.
true, if you miss the time to vote, you still have the right to complain because you wanted to vote.
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aquarius_horse
the fact that if you don't vote, you don't have a reason to complain,

That's kind of a fallacy. There are plenty of people who see the election as a sham where you vote for Overlord #1 and Overlord #2, with some mini-overlords running third party. They have every right to express their dissatisfaction because this is America and free speech doesn't hinge on having voted.

It's like saying that a person is throwing away their vote by voting 3rd party. Who someone votes for is a personal decision, and if someone wants to vote third party it is their vote and their voice. It's no more throwing away your vote than voting Obama in a heavily Republican state or McCain in a heavily Democratic state.
Hey Im doing my persuasion speech on voting and I wanted some ideas how to start it... please if you can I really would appreciate it.

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