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Bornes's avatar

Aged Phantom

Arcobelano

eh i mean i can get a ride, i just dont have a car to leisurely go wherever i want without notifying people. I want to major in computer programming/engineering.
User ImageWhat exactly do you want to do in that? Because depending on who you work for, you don't need a degree. You just need experience and the various certifications.

I'm just using the car as a milestone, really. This ideal that american kids have these days about going to college and then instantly getting a better job when you're done is wrong. You need experience and a degree. So while you're in college, you need to be working, too (which is obviously easier if you have a car and aren't starving).

So what I'm saying is, if you want to go to college, work now until you have enough money to buy a car (you don't necessarily have to buy a car, but have enough money to) THEN go to college.
You do not have to enter college right after high school-- that is a ploy. DO NOT FALL INTO IT.

It's never too late to go to college. If you don't want to now you can later. College students are people of all ages, there is no limit. s**t, one of my classmates was in his 60s.
Bornes
Arcobelano

eh i mean i can get a ride, i just dont have a car to leisurely go wherever i want without notifying people. I want to major in computer programming/engineering.
User ImageWhat exactly do you want to do in that? Because depending on who you work for, you don't need a degree. You just need experience and the various certifications.

I'm just using the car as a milestone, really. This ideal that american kids have these days about going to college and then instantly getting a better job when you're done is wrong. You need experience and a degree. So while you're in college, you need to be working, too (which is obviously easier if you have a car and aren't starving).

So what I'm saying is, if you want to go to college, work now until you have enough money to buy a car (you don't necessarily have to buy a car, but have enough money to) THEN go to college.
You do not have to enter college right after high school-- that is a ploy. DO NOT FALL INTO IT.

It's never too late to go to college. If you don't want to now you can later. College students are people of all ages, there is no limit. s**t, one of my classmates was in his 60s.



i dont know i really want to accomplish all the stuff i tell myself im gonna do. Like single handedly put the homeless back to work, and build an airship.
Bornes's avatar

Aged Phantom

Arcobelano

i dont know i really want to accomplish all the stuff i tell myself im gonna do. Like single handedly put the homeless back to work, and build an airship.
User ImageNot sure if you're serious but ok...
Something like the airship would need an engineering or aeronautical science degree.

But if you're worried about debt and money, I still stand by everything I said: Work first to get a nice savings account going, then go to college later. Otherwise, work and go to college part-time.
You can also work and go to college full-time, BUT I hear STEM fields are super difficult to pursue so your brain would probably die if you attempted full-time work and school in that field.

But part-time college and work would probably be your best bet, here.
Bornes
Arcobelano

i dont know i really want to accomplish all the stuff i tell myself im gonna do. Like single handedly put the homeless back to work, and build an airship.
User ImageNot sure if you're serious but ok...
Something like the airship would need an engineering or aeronautical science degree.

But if you're worried about debt and money, I still stand by everything I said: Work first to get a nice savings account going, then go to college later. Otherwise, work and go to college part-time.
You can also work and go to college full-time, BUT I hear STEM fields are super difficult to pursue so your brain would probably die if you attempted full-time work and school in that field.

But part-time college and work would probably be your best bet, here.



im dead set on that airship thing. Although i really want to give the homeless jobs also.
Neko Namida Ame's avatar

Shirtless Raider

Go to community college. It's far faaar cheaper and your grades and SAT scores now won't matter. Once you do well at it, your high school gpa isn't worth s**t and won't even be acknowledged when you apply for better colleges (if you want to). It's your best bet if you don't know what you want to be doing right now because you'll get to try things out that you won't be able to otherwise and it doesn't cost an arm and a leg. You will find yourself severely limited in the job market unless you have fantastic connections with out a college degree and working your way up is not easy at all.
Neko Namida Ame
Go to community college. It's far faaar cheaper and your grades and SAT scores now won't matter. Once you do well at it, your high school gpa isn't worth s**t and won't even be acknowledged when you apply for better colleges (if you want to). It's your best bet if you don't know what you want to be doing right now because you'll get to try things out that you won't be able to otherwise and it doesn't cost an arm and a leg. You will find yourself severely limited in the job market unless you have fantastic connections with out a college degree and working your way up is not easy at all.



yeah, maybe i could go to community college for 1 year and then transfer to get my masters for comp programming and engineering.
Neko Namida Ame's avatar

Shirtless Raider

Arcobelano
Neko Namida Ame
Go to community college. It's far faaar cheaper and your grades and SAT scores now won't matter. Once you do well at it, your high school gpa isn't worth s**t and won't even be acknowledged when you apply for better colleges (if you want to). It's your best bet if you don't know what you want to be doing right now because you'll get to try things out that you won't be able to otherwise and it doesn't cost an arm and a leg. You will find yourself severely limited in the job market unless you have fantastic connections with out a college degree and working your way up is not easy at all.



yeah, maybe i could go to community college for 1 year and then transfer to get my masters for comp programming and engineering.

Lol, you mean your bachelors. Masters is another 2+ years on top of a bachelors degree. But yeah, it's a good idea and if you realize you absolutely hate something and can't stand doing it the rest of your life at least you wouldn't have wasted a ton of time and money on it in community college.
It depends on what you are going to college for.
Nawty_Nazi's avatar

Blessed Sex Symbol

Arcobelano
Ok im a senior this year, blah blah. My SAT score was a 1360 over all(includes writing portion) with my highest math and reading scores being 560 and 410. I know my SAT scores arnt great and im deciding if i want to retake it for the third time around this time. Is college honestly worth the debt and considering the unemployment rate of college grad's im wondering what i should do at this point.

I dont have a car nor do i have my liscence yet so that makes getting around to find jobs harder, and even if i do find one the commute would be pretty tedious and long, my parents havent saved any money for college at all. I just feel annoyed and irritated considering all the things that i want to do and the actual reality. Im trying my hardest in school, harder than i've ever been before in my school career, and im actually involving myself into misc school activities.

Honestly what is college going to do for me in this day and age besides a better shot at being the 1 percent? yeah, yeah i know its a higher education and i already know what my major is going to be but will it be worth it in the long run, in this day and age?


advice about anything i just said would help me.


You know the saying "If you tell yourself something long enough, eventually you start to believe it."

That's what college is. It's something that "educators" have been drilling into your head since you were a child. As have your parents and just about everyone else you know.

However... if you take away all the bullshit everyone drills into your head all your life about needing to go to college and having a heads up on everyone else... you'll realize it's all bullshit.

Now I should back up slightly and I will say some careers do require extended educations... of course the obvious such as doctors, scientists medical related careers in general... But the truth is, the majority of jobs out there do not "require" you to have a degree.

In fact, a very common frustration you will see in college students is when they come out of college have some fancy degree framed on their wall collecting dust cuz most jobs they want to apply to will prefer hiring someone with experience... which a college student won't have because they were busy spending money sitting in a class room as opposed to making money and getting experience early to move up in their career field earlier etc.

On the other hand, you will also notice an equally common frustration in college students when they really take the time to job hunt and they find out all the money and time they put into getting a college education, is again worthless, because there are many jobs in their field they can get into with no experience needed, or no degree needed etc. In other words, they just wasted "x" amount of years in college, wasting all that time and money when they could have been getting ahead in the field of their choice, making money, not throwing it away.

So while bob get's out of high school and opts to get a "bottom of the ladder" job and not go to college... He makes out much better than Joe, who decided to go to college. Bob works real hard at his job, and he makes money. His employers see he's a hard worker and they give him a raise, more money for Bob. Soon Bob gets a promotion and moves up the ladder, making more money getting more experience...

And then there's Joe. Joe goes to college like everyone told him with promises of bettering his future. Well Joe works really hard in college and he loses money, because he's taking loans out to support his expenses, and building debt... His teachers see he's working hard and they give him... good grades. Joe spends all his time studying and taking tests and doing projects for his classes... but never gets any legit experience in his field. It's time for Joe to take the next step... he needs to look for an internship cuz college is almost done and when it's over, the loan officers and debt collectors are going to want their money.

So... who do you think is in a better position? If you were an employer, who would you rather hire? Bob, who has been directly in the real business world itself and has actual hands on experience? Or... Joe. Who has basically no experience, outside of demonstrations and stories he's seen or heard from teachers.

But more importantly, who would you rather be? Bob has no debt. Everything he has, he worked for along the way so he has built good credit, and can probably be qualified for better loans for better cars, better homes etc. And, Bob has much higher chances of being hired due to his experience to get higher positions and continue to move higher in his field and make a better living for himself.

While Joe... has less experience, has probably ran his credit into the ground and is buried in debt. Doesn't even have a job, can't pay off the mountain of debt he already has, let alone even think about trying to get "better" things like new houses or new cars.

However, let's give Joe the benefit of the doubt. Let's say Joe finds a decent job, and because he has a degree and some experience from an internship he did in his last few years of college... Guess what? He's STILL way behind in comparison to Bob. While Bob probably already has a house, and has little to no debt and can begin looking to bigger better things because he didn't waste hundreds of dollars on an education... Joe will be in debt for years to come paying off all the loans for that education that basically just got him to the same place Bob is.

Now, there are exceptions, but there are very few. It's very dependent on the field you want to go into but if you talk to MOST people, those who took the college route and those who didn't, I can almost guarantee you a huge chunk of the college kids today are regretting their "choice". The grass is always greener on the other side... But also remember, "it's never too late". You can go to college any time. My advice is to really research your career path itself. See what your options are and see if you really need college. If you don't, you're a helluva lot better off avoiding it.

Even all debt aside, even the spoiled little rich kids who have mommy and daddy pay for everything... going to college takes a good few years of your life... that's time you could have been spending more wisely, like in the career path of your choice itself. And I won't even get into other college "activities" such as the partying, and drinking and wasting of your life itself.
Community college is cheaper than University, and they've had to up the ante on their curriculum, so you can actually learn something if you go nowadays. Fafsa can help you depending on your GPA, and you can apply for scholarships and student loans.

The chance of you getting a job by the end of college is greater than mine, simply because you will graduate at a later year, and estimates pin employment opportunities with higher pay being more readily available to new graduates in eight or six years.

But that depends on if you want a higher paying job.

Some people are fine with an average paying job.

Others are happy with a low paying job.

And then there are those who are absolutely ecstatic to make minimum wage and only go to work twice a week for groceries because they live on a couple of acres they saved up and got for cheap and are otherwise completely self-sustaining.
le g h o s t i e's avatar

Seeker

Went to college, promised to get into a program to pay for all my loans if I became a teacher, went through first year and went to apply for the program--boom! "Sorry, we just stopped doing that program." Stuck with 5.5k in debt and no money for college next year despite good grades. ******** it. If you can afford it then go. If not. *shrugs* I'm paid 8.50/hr without my college education and am likely to get another raise soon.
Ziporae's avatar

Timid Fairy

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If you sincerely want to stick to computer science, go to college. I suggest community college to start out and of course FAFSA-- just get your plan figured out and make sure your courses will transfer to said university or w/e. If you do get a degree in computer science you will be making more than enough money to pay off tuition. I highly recommend getting a side job even slightly related to what you want to pursue while in college- in your case, IT. This will make you that much more marketable.

Now, if your plans fall through (computer science is extremely difficult, after all) there are other options as well. If you are satisfied with just trying to make ends meet then don't bother with the college fiasco. Just keep in mind that until you are out in the real world paying for your own bills, food, rent, etc. the cost of living has not really hit you yet or just how much work it takes. However, I have seen very motivated and crafty individuals make it well off without a degree. I have also seen smart people with degrees make the wrong decisions and end up in the same boat. The endgame is really the same-- whatever you do, make sure that you do it to get an actual job. Many college-goers forget this! Do not jump into anything prematurely and do the research.

While Nawty_Nazi has made some good points, it is a lot harder for HS grads with no further education to get a decent paying job in this economy. What I have witnessed myself is HS grads getting certain jobs over college grades purely based on the fact that they can be payed LESS. Also, for your desired career path college is really a must. Personally, I am currently attending community college and I truly feel I have made the right decision for myself with no regrets (it is way less expensive). Now, it is really different for everybody and ultimately you have to make the decision that works for your aspirations, skill set, and financial restrictions. Before starting college look more into what you want to do instead of going about aimlessly-- unfortunately there are many who do this with not-so-great results.
Ziporae
If you sincerely want to stick to computer science, go to college. I suggest community college to start out and of course FAFSA-- just get your plan figured out and make sure your courses will transfer to said university or w/e. If you do get a degree in computer science you will be making more than enough money to pay off tuition. I highly recommend getting a side job even slightly related to what you want to pursue while in college- in your case, IT. This will make you that much more marketable.

Now, if your plans fall through (computer science is extremely difficult, after all) there are other options as well. If you are satisfied with just trying to make ends meet then don't bother with the college fiasco. Just keep in mind that until you are out in the real world paying for your own bills, food, rent, etc. the cost of living has not really hit you yet or just how much work it takes. However, I have seen very motivated and crafty individuals make it well off without a degree. I have also seen smart people with degrees make the wrong decisions and end up in the same boat. The endgame is really the same-- whatever you do, make sure that you do it to get an actual job. Many college-goers forget this! Do not jump into anything prematurely and do the research.

While Nawty_Nazi has made some good points, it is a lot harder for HS grads with no further education to get a decent paying job in this economy. What I have witnessed myself is HS grads getting certain jobs over college grades purely based on the fact that they can be payed LESS. Also, for your desired career path college is really a must. Personally, I am currently attending community college and I truly feel I have made the right decision for myself with no regrets (it is way less expensive). Now, it is really different for everybody and ultimately you have to make the decision that works for your aspirations, skill set, and financial restrictions. Before starting college look more into what you want to do instead of going about aimlessly-- unfortunately there are many who do this with not-so-great results.


You provided great feedback. Hm but yeah, should i spend 1 or two years in community college? and do you need to get an acceptance letter from said college before hand to transfer, or can you just transfer in and not have to be accepted?
Ziporae's avatar

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Arcobelano

You provided great feedback. Hm but yeah, should i spend 1 or two years in community college? and do you need to get an acceptance letter from said college before hand to transfer, or can you just transfer in and not have to be accepted?

I am going for my Associate's so I am spending two years. At first I was going in for one semester, then one year.. and now I am further extending it to two years. Personally, I found the price was right, I have explored my interests, and I have thus far really enjoyed my experience. I am doing this in part to lock my credits in place when transferring, save money, and colleges give scholarship money to those who transfer with an associate's a lot of times.

I would check with your specific program and see just how practical it would be to spend two years. For myself, it made a lot of sense. I HIGHLY recommend checking with the university's transfer center and making an appointment to figure out a game plan. The idea is to take pre-reqs that transfer. Some universities offer dual-enrollment options with community colleges- if you see this opportunity LOOK INTO IT. It is a great way to ensure that your credits transfer seamlessly-- also you may be able to use specific websites for these course equivalencies. However, I am not sure where you live, but my state uses u.select. How many credits you take at community college is really just circumstantial.

As for your second question, I am confused by what you mean... but I think the answer to your question is that you typically have to apply for each term until officially enrolled. This is where dual-enrollment may or may not come in handy. You always have to be accepted by the college you are transferring to and you will apply as a transfer student at this point. Again, I advise you to be wary about transferring. Many times credits are lost (and in that sense, money) if you do not assure the credits will transfer beforehand.
I think you should still go to college. Apply for some scholarships!

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