Welcome to Gaia! ::

Vampirate Kitsune's avatar

Apocalyptic Cutesmasher

14,950 Points
  • Destroyer of Cuteness 150
  • Thread Flip 150
  • Protector of Cuteness 150
Quote:
TV Anchor Takes on Viewer Who Complains About Her Weight

Jennifer Livingston, a local morning anchor in Wisconsin, responded on air directly to a viewer who sent her an e-mail telling her she was an unsuitable role model for young people, especially young girls, because she is overweight.

Ms. Livingston’s response, which has gone viral on the Internet with almost 2 million views on YouTube alone, said she had initially dismissed the criticism but then decided to speak up to raise awareness about bullying behavior.

“The truth is I am overweight,” said Ms. Livingston, 37, during the morning broadcast on WKBT-TV, a CBS affiliate in Lacrosse. “You could call me fat and yes, even obese on a doctor’s chart. But to the person who wrote me that letter, do you think I don’t know that? That your cruel words are pointing out something that I don’t see?”

“You don’t know me,” she continued to say during the next four minutes in what was billed as a broadcast editorial. “You are not a friend of mine. You are not a part of my family, and you have admitted that you don’t watch this show so you know nothing about me but what you see on the outside — and I am much more than a number on a scale.”

Ms. Livingston, a mother of three, then used her experience to remind viewers that October is “National Anti- Bullying Month,” and that bullying is rampant on the Internet and growing every day in schools and must be stopped.

She said she tried to laugh off the hurtful attack on her appearance but that her colleagues, especially, her husband, Mike Thompson, an evening anchor for the station, could not do the same.

Last Friday, Mr. Thompson posted the contents of the e-mail on his Facebook page, adding that he was infuriated by the attack on his wife and it had made him “sick to his stomach.”

The e-mail, written by Kenneth W. Krause, a lawyer, who did not answer multiple telephone calls made to his home in LaCrosse, said:

Hi Jennifer,
It’s unusual that I see your morning show, but I did so for a very short time today. I was surprised indeed to witness that your physical condition hasn’t improved for many years. Surely you don’t consider yourself a suitable example for this community’s young people, girls in particular. Obesity is one of the worst choices a person can make and one of the most dangerous habits to maintain. I leave you this note hoping that you’ll reconsider your responsibility as a local public personality to present and promote a healthy lifestyle.
The Facebook post prompted hundreds of comments over the weekend from people around the world, with many offering support and others sharing their pain over having been bullied because of their weight.

Ms. Livingston, the sister of Golden-Globe nominated actor, Ron Livingston, said during her broadcast on Tuesday that the outpouring on Facebook inspired her to take a public stand against bullying.

As a grown woman, she said that she was able to dismiss this man’s remarks. But she worried that children targeted with similar messages were not able to do so. She said she was also concerned about what children were learning about bullying at home.

“If you are at home and you are talking about the fat news lady, guess what? Your children are probably going to go to school and call someone fat,” Ms. Livingston said.

In closing, she thanked her friends, family, colleague and the many people offered their words of support. “We are better than the bullies that would try to take us down.”:

Then, looking directly into the camera, she said:

“I leave you with this: To all of the children out there who feel lost, who are struggling with your weight, with the color of your skin, your sexual preference, your disability, even the acne on your face, listen to me right now: Do not let your self-worth be defined by bullies. Learn from my experience — that the cruel words of one are nothing compared to the shouts of many.”

During an interview with NBC’s Today Show, Ms. Livingston said that she is not opposed to talking about obesity but she does not think that personal attacks should be part of the conversation.

Mr. Krause was invited to be interviewed on WKBT-TV, a programming director said. Instead, he issued a statement, which was shared on the air. The statement concluded with Mr. Krause saying: “Considering Jennifer Livingston’s fortuitous position in the community, I hope she will finally take advantage of a rare and golden opportunity to influence the health and psychological well-being of Coulee region children by transforming herself for all of her viewers to see over the next year.”


source



My response to this word-for-a-donkey:

Quote:
Mr. Krause, what kind of role model are you? You are a man who judges a woman’s value as a role model solely by her appearance. Her sophistication, her education, her achievements—- none of that matters. Should all little boys follow your self-righteous, obnoxious, and shallow lead and become men who judge girls and women solely by their looks and shape?

I would rather have Ms. Livington’s broad body than your narrow mind, Mr. Krause.




UPDATE: It seems Krause is not, in fact, a lawyer but a security guard. Since the story first broke, he's been quoted as saying “Days after defending his infamous email to local Wisconsin TV anchor Jennifer Livingston criticizing her weight, Kenneth Krause now says he ‘never meant to hurt’ her and would possibly revise how he handled the situation.”

He's still a slang-for-a-male-body part.
VirginianRanger's avatar

Profitable Prophet

7,600 Points
  • Citizen 200
  • Friendly 100
  • Person of Interest 200
I'd like to say three words about this topic: Sticks and stones.

And just to let you know, I agree with 99.99% of the things you post, Kitsune. I just feel that my three word response would've better served her cause.
Thefruitsong's avatar

Profitable Gaian

8,600 Points
  • Profitable 100
  • Junior Trader 100
  • Conversationalist 100
You know... Some people cannot help that they are overweight. That was a rude thing to say! Not everyone can be stick thin! People are who they are, and as long as they aren't hurting anyone, what the issue!?
Blood Valkyrie's avatar

Sparkly Shapeshifter

11,550 Points
  • Megathread 100
  • Lavish Tipper 200
  • Person of Interest 200
I'm pretty sure it's none of his damn business that she's a bit plump.
Lady Mallory's avatar

Lily-livered Cutie-Pie

8,950 Points
  • Partygoer 500
  • Thread Flip 150
  • Protector of Cuteness 150
Good for her. If she wants to lose weight or not, that's her choice and decision. She responded in a mature and classy manner, despite having to deal with imbeciles.

That guy should check himself in the mirror before judging others.
David2074's avatar

Playful Kitten

16,900 Points
  • Conversationalist 100
  • Mark Twain 100
  • Conventioneer 300
While I agree the woman's weight is not the sum of her worth I think the comments in this thread are unfairly biased in favor of the woman. It's easy to "hate on guy who doesn't like fat chicks" but he wasn't "bullying" and one could argue it is Ms. Livingston who is being the bully. Try to be open minded a bit and consider the following:

1. The man feels people in the public eye should try to be good examples including physical health. You don't have to agree with it but he has a right to that opinion and it is certainly a topic that has been in the news with all the articles about obesity in America, changes in the food pyramid, changes in school lunches and so on.

2. The man did not 'bully' the lady. He expressed his views very politely. These views were not well received by the TV anchor but someone making a career in news should be used to hearing opposing points of view. The man did not swear at her, threaten her, call her rude names etc. He simply stated his opinion that she was setting a bad example by being an obese public figure.

3. He sent these opinions as a private email. He didn't call her a fat pig publicly on FB, he sent a politely worded private email.

4. In response to the emailed opinion the lady and her husband called him out publicly, named him and reproduced his email, labeled him as a 'bully' and basically tried to publicly humiliate him for expressing his opinion.

IMO Ms. Livingston is the real bully here.
You don't have to agree with Mr. Krause's opinion but his actions were hardly 'bullying'.
Have we really reached a point where things are so 'PC' that anyone expressing an unpopular opinion in a polite and private manner is a 'bully'? If so then - sigh and facepalm.
Vampirate Kitsune's avatar

Apocalyptic Cutesmasher

14,950 Points
  • Destroyer of Cuteness 150
  • Thread Flip 150
  • Protector of Cuteness 150
David2074
2. The man did not 'bully' the lady. He expressed his views very politely. These views were not well received by the TV anchor but someone making a career in news should be used to hearing opposing points of view. The man did not swear at her, threaten her, call her rude names etc. He simply stated his opinion that she was setting a bad example by being an obese public figure. .



"Surely you don’t consider yourself a suitable example for this community’s young people, girls in particular."

He might as well have come right out and said, "You're an idiot if you think a fat woman has any value. Only thin women should be seen in public." Or he could have been more blunt: "You're fat. You should stay out of sight." His language was polite, but the insult was still clear and obvious. And hurtful, as I'm sure he meant it to be.


David2074

3. He sent these opinions as a private email. He didn't call her a fat pig publicly on FB, he sent a politely worded private email.

4. In response to the emailed opinion the lady and her husband called him out publicly, named him and reproduced his email, labeled him as a 'bully' and basically tried to publicly humiliate him for expressing his opinion..



It was the husband -- and only the husband -- who made the e-mail public. He's been quite clear about that. And he's admitted he did so because he was so furious.

Ms. Livingston's responses to Mr. Krause have been consistently civil and gracious. She hasn't raised her voice, hasn't called him a single name, and has kept her head high. She has not been a bully at all. But I don't doubt that she is very hurt by the insult, and I'm sure that supporters of Krause have echoed the insult, although she does not acknowledge them.

Every woman is bombarded with "FAT IS BAD" messages every single day. We'd have to be in a coma not to be aware of them. And we are made to feel bad about ourselves multiple times every day. Krause was way off base by directly and politely insulting Ms. Livingston with his e-mail. It was the act of a bully.

Just my opinion, as a victim of similar conduct.
David2074's avatar

Playful Kitten

16,900 Points
  • Conversationalist 100
  • Mark Twain 100
  • Conventioneer 300
Vampirate Kitsune
David2074
2. The man did not 'bully' the lady. He expressed his views very politely. These views were not well received by the TV anchor but someone making a career in news should be used to hearing opposing points of view. The man did not swear at her, threaten her, call her rude names etc. He simply stated his opinion that she was setting a bad example by being an obese public figure. .



"Surely you don’t consider yourself a suitable example for this community’s young people, girls in particular."

He might as well have come right out and said, "You're an idiot if you think a fat woman has any value. Only thin women should be seen in public." Or he could have been more blunt: "You're fat. You should stay out of sight." His language was polite, but the insult was still clear and obvious. And hurtful, as I'm sure he meant it to be.


David2074

3. He sent these opinions as a private email. He didn't call her a fat pig publicly on FB, he sent a politely worded private email.

4. In response to the emailed opinion the lady and her husband called him out publicly, named him and reproduced his email, labeled him as a 'bully' and basically tried to publicly humiliate him for expressing his opinion..



It was the husband -- and only the husband -- who made the e-mail public. He's been quite clear about that. And he's admitted he did so because he was so furious.

Ms. Livingston's responses to Mr. Krause have been consistently civil and gracious. She hasn't raised her voice, hasn't called him a single name, and has kept her head high. She has not been a bully at all. But I don't doubt that she is very hurt by the insult, and I'm sure that supporters of Krause have echoed the insult, although she does not acknowledge them.

Every woman is bombarded with "FAT IS BAD" messages every single day. We'd have to be in a coma not to be aware of them. And we are made to feel bad about ourselves multiple times every day. Krause was way off base by directly and politely insulting Ms. Livingston with his e-mail. It was the act of a bully.

Just my opinion, as a victim of similar conduct.


This appears to be a topic we agree to disagree on. As such I'm not so much trying to convince you but I will comment on what you said.

It may be the husband who made the email / name public but the Ms. Livingston made it much more public by drawing attention to it on TV.

The definition of 'bully' is
Noun:
A person who uses strength or power to harm or intimidate those who are weaker.
A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people.
Verb:
Use superior strength or influence to intimidate (someone), typically to force him or her to do what one wants.

You may not like what Mr. Krause said but his email does not meet the definition of bully / bullying.
On the other hand, one could argue that Livingston and her husband did use their influence to intimidate Krause. If she was not a popular TV entity few people would see the email on FB or would have heard her comments on TV. As a result of them Krause has backed off of his point of view due to all the hate being sent his way.

I find it interesting that you consider Krause's comments 'bullying' because even though it was polite you find his views offensive but you defend Ms. Livingston as not being a bully because her response was polite (even though the couple publicly calling Krause a bully has intimdated him into backing off on his stance and had this effect due to their power / influence).

You are twisting his words. Suggesting obese is a bad example is not the same as saying the person has to be 'skinny'. Nor is it saying the person (male or female) has no other value as a human being. The truth is most people don't know much about the personal lives of anchormen. These people are largely 'talking heads'. They read the news on the teleprompter and don't have too much opportunity to express their personal views, often tempered by what the station allows. So really, visual image is about all most folks have to go on.

You make it sound like only women are sometimes looked down on for being overweight. I am an overweight male and I know opinions are not limited to females. I also find it interesting that when someone speaks out publicly about too many overly skinny people in the media people, especially women, usually agree. When it is made public that a man privately spoke out against a woman in the media being too large he is called out as a hater. In both cases the people making the comments are simply arguing for the media to promote people of a healthy weight being shown more prominently in the media.
Vampirate Kitsune's avatar

Apocalyptic Cutesmasher

14,950 Points
  • Destroyer of Cuteness 150
  • Thread Flip 150
  • Protector of Cuteness 150
David2074
The definition of 'bully' is
Noun:
A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people.


We don't know whether this definition applies to Mr. Krause. It might, it might not.

Perhaps I'm over-reacting somewhat. Mr. Krause's words and photograph remind me of a tormentor I once had, although I'm not at all sure this is the same person.

But there, as here, I found his opinion not only uncalled for but unhelpful, no matter what his intent may or may not have been. More than one study has found that shaming a person for their weight often leads to weight gain rather than loss. So Krause fails on this point: he does harm, not good.

And the fact remains that Krause did not balance his shallow criticism of Ms. Livingston as a role model with anything positive. He focused solely on her appearance and decreed that she is a bad example. Having been a girl once myself, I could tell him that I never noticed a role model's weight as much as I noticed other qualities, unless someone --- someone like him --- focused my attention on the person's shortcomings. Again, Krause fails. He diverts viewers from noticing his targets many virtues and focusing their attention on one flaw. Or perhaps he succeeds, because now many people's eyes will be offended.

And there I go over-reacting again. rolleyes The subject is a touchy one. emo I get too riled about it. scream stressed And then I get ridiculous. gonk

Perhaps we can just agree to disagree because our experiences and perceptions differ so much. I don't think you're wrong, I just think differently. Truce?
Nyadriel's avatar

Dangerous Fairy

20,800 Points
  • Alchemy Level 10 100
  • Fusion Apprentice 100
  • Party Animal 100
David2074
While I agree the woman's weight is not the sum of her worth I think the comments in this thread are unfairly biased in favor of the woman. It's easy to "hate on guy who doesn't like fat chicks" but he wasn't "bullying" and one could argue it is Ms. Livingston who is being the bully. Try to be open minded a bit and consider the following:

1. The man feels people in the public eye should try to be good examples including physical health. You don't have to agree with it but he has a right to that opinion and it is certainly a topic that has been in the news with all the articles about obesity in America, changes in the food pyramid, changes in school lunches and so on.

2. The man did not 'bully' the lady. He expressed his views very politely. These views were not well received by the TV anchor but someone making a career in news should be used to hearing opposing points of view. The man did not swear at her, threaten her, call her rude names etc. He simply stated his opinion that she was setting a bad example by being an obese public figure.

3. He sent these opinions as a private email. He didn't call her a fat pig publicly on FB, he sent a politely worded private email.

4. In response to the emailed opinion the lady and her husband called him out publicly, named him and reproduced his email, labeled him as a 'bully' and basically tried to publicly humiliate him for expressing his opinion.

IMO Ms. Livingston is the real bully here.
You don't have to agree with Mr. Krause's opinion but his actions were hardly 'bullying'.
Have we really reached a point where things are so 'PC' that anyone expressing an unpopular opinion in a polite and private manner is a 'bully'? If so then - sigh and facepalm.


She was also interviewed on the CBS This Morning Show. But it was reported on WFSB before then on the same morning.

To add in response to your # 2: he sent her a second e-mail cause he wasn't about to give up. That all the more reason why it was considered bullying. That and he lied about what job he has.
David2074's avatar

Playful Kitten

16,900 Points
  • Conversationalist 100
  • Mark Twain 100
  • Conventioneer 300
Vampirate Kitsune
David2074
The definition of 'bully' is
Noun:
A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people.


We don't know whether this definition applies to Mr. Krause. It might, it might not.

Perhaps I'm over-reacting somewhat. Mr. Krause's words and photograph remind me of a tormentor I once had, although I'm not at all sure this is the same person.

But there, as here, I found his opinion not only uncalled for but unhelpful, no matter what his intent may or may not have been. More than one study has found that shaming a person for their weight often leads to weight gain rather than loss. So Krause fails on this point: he does harm, not good.

And the fact remains that Krause did not balance his shallow criticism of Ms. Livingston as a role model with anything positive. He focused solely on her appearance and decreed that she is a bad example. Having been a girl once myself, I could tell him that I never noticed a role model's weight as much as I noticed other qualities, unless someone --- someone like him --- focused my attention on the person's shortcomings. Again, Krause fails. He diverts viewers from noticing his targets many virtues and focusing their attention on one flaw. Or perhaps he succeeds, because now many people's eyes will be offended.

And there I go over-reacting again. rolleyes The subject is a touchy one. emo I get too riled about it. scream stressed And then I get ridiculous. gonk

Perhaps we can just agree to disagree because our experiences and perceptions differ so much. I don't think you're wrong, I just think differently. Truce?


I'm fine with a truce but I want to make it clear that from my side I don't see the need for one.
By that I mean I was not feeling any anger or hostility towards you. I just disagree on making 'rude comment' synonymous with 'bully'. Krause made some private comments many people consider rude or unkind. Livingston and her husband used their fame and public media to put him down publicly and generate a bunch of hate on Krause. Fat or skinny I think what Livingston and her husband did was unprofessional. I have no problem with you having a different opinion on the matter.
jellykans's avatar

Playful Guildswoman

Vampirate Kitsune
Quote:
TV Anchor Takes on Viewer Who Complains About Her Weight

Jennifer Livingston, a local morning anchor in Wisconsin, responded on air directly to a viewer who sent her an e-mail telling her she was an unsuitable role model for young people, especially young girls, because she is overweight.
...
“If you are at home and you are talking about the fat news lady, guess what? Your children are probably going to go to school and call someone fat,” Ms. Livingston said.

In closing, she thanked her friends, family, colleague and the many people offered their words of support.
“We are better than the bullies that would try to take us down.”:
...

...
UPDATE: It seems Krause is not, in fact, a lawyer but a security guard.


(I added the bolding and large size....I like that line.)

Some people ae over-endowed with hormones and under-endowed with logic. Not attractive in either sex.
Smudged_Makeup's avatar

Sparkly Lunatic

David2074
While I agree the woman's weight is not the sum of her worth I think the comments in this thread are unfairly biased in favor of the woman. It's easy to "hate on guy who doesn't like fat chicks" but he wasn't "bullying" and one could argue it is Ms. Livingston who is being the bully. Try to be open minded a bit and consider the following:

1. The man feels people in the public eye should try to be good examples including physical health. You don't have to agree with it but he has a right to that opinion and it is certainly a topic that has been in the news with all the articles about obesity in America, changes in the food pyramid, changes in school lunches and so on.

2. The man did not 'bully' the lady. He expressed his views very politely. These views were not well received by the TV anchor but someone making a career in news should be used to hearing opposing points of view. The man did not swear at her, threaten her, call her rude names etc. He simply stated his opinion that she was setting a bad example by being an obese public figure.

3. He sent these opinions as a private email. He didn't call her a fat pig publicly on FB, he sent a politely worded private email.

4. In response to the emailed opinion the lady and her husband called him out publicly, named him and reproduced his email, labeled him as a 'bully' and basically tried to publicly humiliate him for expressing his opinion.

IMO Ms. Livingston is the real bully here.
You don't have to agree with Mr. Krause's opinion but his actions were hardly 'bullying'.
Have we really reached a point where things are so 'PC' that anyone expressing an unpopular opinion in a polite and private manner is a 'bully'? If so then - sigh and facepalm.


I'd like to bring up a couple of points if I may?

Towards your first point, weight, greater weight, is not causation to poorer health. There is a correlation yes, albeit one that I consider a fairly weak one as, to my knowledge, pretty much all 'diseases' which are considered 'fat diseases' (IE Diabetes, heart disease, cardiovascular disease, etc) also occur in thinner people. Fat =/= poor health.
Speaking from experience I am a larger woman. My doctor considers me overweight and BMI charts consider me morbidly obese. My health frankly isn't all that bad. My blood sugars, my blood pressure, etc are average as is my metabolism. My stamina may not be that great but I can sure as hell outwalk my slim, thin friends.
My doctor is not concerned about my health due to my weight.
And lets not even get into the things that can cause larger weight aside from an inactive lifestyle and food intake.
Body shaming, regardless of intention, is just not nice.

Towards your second point;

The generalization that larger weight means that a person is unhealthy can, and is, hurtful and has, and will, be used as a bullying tactic.
Whether or not the man in question phrased his letter in a polite matter doesn't lessen the fact that he made an assumption based on her solely on her appearance, having known, and admitted to knowing, nothing about her.
Whether or not a person may consider that bullying, it's certainly rude. Likewise disqualifying her as role model material based completely on her appearance, again knowing nothing about her except that she's overweight.
He likewise lied to put himself in a position of authority, by falsifying his credentials as a lawyer. We do not know if this man went to college or university, nor his salary/wage as a securityguard but I do feel that it can be safely assumed that, stereotypically a lawyer will probably have had a better education and a better wage than a news anchor. I have little doubt this was a manipulative tactic meant to put himself as a position of authority greater than what his actual job entailed.
This does meet the criterion in the definition you had later posted, after writing this.

However I will agree that exposing his name to the public was not the nicest thing to do either. The matter, in regards to names at least, should have been kept private. Her public response on television, however, I believe was well done presuming his name was kept anonymous...I haven't actually watched the video yet, but if this article is truthful I laud her decision to speak up for herself, and on behalf of other people who have to deal with body shaming, and indeed shaming of any sort.

It's just not nice.

But I do agree that he shouldn't have been name dropped. That wasn't nice to do either, and names should have been kept private. If anything, it's no doubt opened him up to a lot of harsh criticism he certainly wasn't expecting, much less necessarily deserved.
Bullying a bully is just as bad as bullying in and of itself.
David2074's avatar

Playful Kitten

16,900 Points
  • Conversationalist 100
  • Mark Twain 100
  • Conventioneer 300
Nyadriel
She was also interviewed on the CBS This Morning Show. But it was reported on WFSB before then on the same morning.

To add in response to your # 2: he sent her a second e-mail cause he wasn't about to give up. That all the more reason why it was considered bullying. That and he lied about what job he has.


Can you link me to a source stating Krause lied about his profession?
I read that as the news got it wrong the first time and later corrected themselves, not that Krause said he is a lawyer.

However, from what I can find he IS a lawyer, or at least someone with the same name is.
I find sites referring to him (or someone by the same name) as
" a former prosecutor"
Kenneth W. Krause lives in Wisconsin, along the Mississippi River. He is a former prosecutor and criminal defense attorney with degrees in law
Kenneth W. Krause is a contributing editor, books editor, and "The Good Book" columnist for the Humanist and a contributing editor and columnist for the ...
Lawyers.com lists a - Kenneth W. Krause 2120 Mississippi St., La Crosse, WI 54601-5013
And.. the Wisconsin bar association web site attorney search lists -
Atty. Kenneth W. Krause La Crosse, WI


Krause sent a private email. Husband made it public. Wife discussed it on multiple TV shows. So Krause responding to all that proves he is a bully? Sorry, but no.
You can hate his opinion if you want but just about anyone would respond to all that.
jellykans's avatar

Playful Guildswoman

David2074
Vampirate Kitsune
David2074
The definition of 'bully' is
Noun:
A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people.

We don't know whether this definition applies to Mr. Krause. It might, it might not....But ... I found his opinion not only uncalled for but unhelpful, no matter what his intent may or may not have been. More than one study has found that shaming a person for their weight often leads to weight gain rather than loss. So Krause fails on this point: he does harm, not good.

...Krause did not balance his shallow criticism of Ms. Livingston as a role model with anything positive. He focused solely on her appearance and decreed that she is a bad example....

Perhaps we can just agree to disagree because our experiences and perceptions differ so much. I don't think you're wrong, I just think differently. Truce?


... I was not feeling any anger or hostility towards you. I just disagree on making 'rude comment' synonymous with 'bully'. Krause made some private comments many people consider rude or unkind. Livingston and her husband used their fame and public media to put him down publicly and generate a bunch of hate on Krause. Fat or skinny I think what Livingston and her husband did was unprofessional. I have no problem with you having a different opinion on the matter.


I butchered the above quotes to focus on specific points. I know David did in fact 'just disagree' and my first reaction was to point back to where the announcer at first intended to 'let it pass; because she 'was an adult.' However - very often such comments result in weight gain, not loss - such attacks are in fact damaging to adults as well.

I think Daid's point about a private remark being addressed publicly, and giving the person's name, is a valid point. But who writes to a public figure thinking they have the privilege of saying what they want and expecting it to be kept private? Fan mail is normally answered by employees, which is certainly nt private. However, the anchor addressed it on air and the man's name was given. I would feel no obligation to keep private a letter to me from a stranger. Not sure I would use the person's name, kind of doubt it. And I am not a public figure.

Her reasoning was that letting it pass would be giving tacit approval to such behavior, when that kind of behavior is becoming more and more of a problem.

So - what is bullying? That was my first response. Here is Wikipedia's entry:

"Bullying is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others.[/'b] The behavior can be habitual and involve an imbalance of social or physical power. It can include verbal harassment or threat, physical assault or coercion and may be directed repeatedly towards particular victims, perhaps on grounds of race, religion, gender, sexuality, or ability.[2][3] The victim of bullying is sometimes referred to as a "target".

Bullying can be defined in many different ways. The UK currently has no legal definition of bullying,[4] while some U.S. states have laws against it.[5] Bullying consists of three basic types of abuse – emotional, verbal, and physical. It typically involves subtle methods of coercion such as intimidation.

Bullying ranges from simple one-on-one bullying to more complex bullying in which the bully may have one or more "lieutenants" who may seem to be willing to assist the primary bully in his or her bullying activities. Bullying in school and the workplace is also referred to as peer abuse.[6] Robert W. Fuller has analyzed bullying in the context of rankism.

Bullying can occur in any context in which human beings interact with each other. This includes school, church, family, the workplace, home, and neighborhoods. It is even a common push factor in migration. Bullying can exist between social groups, social classes, and even between countries (see jingoism). In fact, on an international scale, perceived or real imbalances of power between nations, in both economic systems and in treaty systems, are often cited as some of the primary causes of both World War I and World War II.[7][8]"

- Bullying[/url[

Use superior strength or influence to intimidate (someone), typically to force him or her to do what one wants. - google first entry - no source given

Definition of BULLY. 1. archaic. a : sweetheart. b : a fine chap. 2. a : a blustering browbeating person; especially : one habitually cruel to others who are weaker ... - Merriam-Webster.com

A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people. 2. A hired ruffian; a thug. 3. A pimp. 4. Archaic A fine person. 5. Archaic ...- thefreedictionary.com

A person who is habitually cruel or overbearing, especially to smaller or weaker people. 2. A hired ruffian; a thug. 3. A pimp. 4. Archaic A fine person. 5. Archaic ... - childparenting.about.com/

i suspect the definition varies by a person's sense of power - those who have experienced it are more likely to be sensitive to it or the possibility. Personally, I wouldn't use repetition as part of the definition, unless the person was known to act differently. I would focus on coercion, both outrageous and subtle. Subtle is, after all, more effective, since it tens to be ignored by those not targeted.

I had an interesting ('makes you think" wink experience in a Labor Studies class on community organizing. Those of us who lived in the flatlands felt we needed to carry ID if walking at night, in case of talking with cops, where those who lived in the hills did not. The surprise was that this clearly did NOT fall along racial lines, but was clearly divided by location. (Bullying by police officers does occur - it is not with every single one, but generally they respond very differently when dealing with a potential problem situation in one area or the other.)

Quick Reply

Submit
Manage Your Items
Other Stuff
Get Items
Get Gaia Cash
Where Everyone Hangs Out
Other Community Areas
Virtual Spaces
Fun Stuff
Gaia's Games