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Captain Rammstein
Just the thread I need biggrin I apologise for my lack of Finnish spoken, for I am even below a beginner xD However I have a few questions for anyone living in Finland if they will be prepared to help me c:

You don't need to apologize. The Finnish Gaians here understand that Finnish is indeed a tough one, and thus use of English serves as a proper "common ground" where ideas can be exchanged with only the slightest chance of misunderstanding. Thus, I will be answering your questions to the best of my abilities.

Captain Rammstein
I am moving to Finland this year, in August, and I was wondering how hard it is to find a job? I have a place to stay sorted, but I don't fancy just sitting around doing nothing when I am capable of working! Failing that, is University hard to get into? And are there any courses taught in English?

You're moving to Finland, but which city? See, you might just have a better chance of finding work in Helsinki, than some smaller town. That said, finding work in the smaller towns is not impossible, but I believe that if your skills in Finnish language are pretty basic, it might be for the best to work in the bigger cities. Helsinki, Turku or Tampere are the ones I'd recommend the most. Work is to be found, but depending on your education, the economy might make it tough for you to find anything. Don't get discouraged though!

Universities are not that hard to get in to. You just need to study, study and perhaps study even more. If Universities don't want you, there's always the Polytechnics (or as they're preferred to be called "Universities of Applied Sciences" ) that take in people with a tad lower requirements (like me for example!). That said, it doesn't mean it's any easier, it just means that their approach and goals are a bit different from the more scientific Universities. Most universities (both the scientific and the applied sciences ones) offer courses and other possibilities to study in English for both people from- and outside Finland.

Captain Rammstein
I would also like to ask if you know of anyway I can learn Finnish, without it being too difficult, as I point blank refuse to go to a country and not speak the language, even if I speak in the most basic of terms.

Depending on your native language, I'd recommend Swedish first. Finland is bilingual, so if it's easier for you to learn Swedish, that might be a better start for you. However, once you get setteled in here, there are courses that teach Finnish to refugees and immigrants in most, if not all, high schools or community colleges. I attended one of their lessons once and from what I can tell, they teach you pretty much all you need to know about the basics of Finnish language and the Finnish culture. Once you get the hang of it, then you just need to use the language whenever you can, and before you know it you'll be fluently ordering stuff from restaurants and such, and doing all sorts of things. biggrin

Captain Rammstein
Infact any general information would be handy biggrin !

In that case I believe you might be finding what I just said useful. If not, then don't hesitate to ask for more information and I'll see what I can do!
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Captain Rammstein
Just the thread I need biggrin I apologise for my lack of Finnish spoken, for I am even below a beginner xD However I have a few questions for anyone living in Finland if they will be prepared to help me c:

You don't need to apologize. The Finnish Gaians here understand that Finnish is indeed a tough one, and thus use of English serves as a proper "common ground" where ideas can be exchanged with only the slightest chance of misunderstanding. Thus, I will be answering your questions to the best of my abilities.

Captain Rammstein
I am moving to Finland this year, in August, and I was wondering how hard it is to find a job? I have a place to stay sorted, but I don't fancy just sitting around doing nothing when I am capable of working! Failing that, is University hard to get into? And are there any courses taught in English?

You're moving to Finland, but which city? See, you might just have a better chance of finding work in Helsinki, than some smaller town. That said, finding work in the smaller towns is not impossible, but I believe that if your skills in Finnish language are pretty basic, it might be for the best to work in the bigger cities. Helsinki, Turku or Tampere are the ones I'd recommend the most. Work is to be found, but depending on your education, the economy might make it tough for you to find anything. Don't get discouraged though!

Universities are not that hard to get in to. You just need to study, study and perhaps study even more. If Universities don't want you, there's always the Polytechnics (or as they're preferred to be called "Universities of Applied Sciences" ) that take in people with a tad lower requirements (like me for example!). That said, it doesn't mean it's any easier, it just means that their approach and goals are a bit different from the more scientific Universities. Most universities (both the scientific and the applied sciences ones) offer courses and other possibilities to study in English for both people from- and outside Finland.

Captain Rammstein
I would also like to ask if you know of anyway I can learn Finnish, without it being too difficult, as I point blank refuse to go to a country and not speak the language, even if I speak in the most basic of terms.

Depending on your native language, I'd recommend Swedish first. Finland is bilingual, so if it's easier for you to learn Swedish, that might be a better start for you. However, once you get settled in here, there are courses that teach Finnish to refugees and immigrants in most, if not all, high schools or community colleges. I attended one of their lessons once and from what I can tell, they teach you pretty much all you need to know about the basics of Finnish language and the Finnish culture. Once you get the hang of it, then you just need to use the language whenever you can, and before you know it you'll be fluently ordering stuff from restaurants and such, and doing all sorts of things. biggrin

Captain Rammstein
Infact any general information would be handy biggrin !

In that case I believe you might be finding what I just said useful. If not, then don't hesitate to ask for more information and I'll see what I can do!


Thanks alot for the detailed info! To answer one of your questions, I'll be living in Kouvola as that is where my boyfriend lives. I am currently at University in the UK studying French and English, and I will get my degree before I move there. I know as an EU national I would be entitled to the same "benefits" anyone from Finland is, and this includes whatever fees (or lack of) you pay to get into University.

I know a bit of Swedish, and by a bit I mean only just more than I do Finnish biggrin , but I was told that Finnish people aren't really that keen on speaking it, is this true? If thats the case I wouldn't want to make myself unpopular by speaking it to people rofl
Captain Rammstein
Thanks alot for the detailed info! To answer one of your questions, I'll be living in Kouvola as that is where my boyfriend lives. I am currently at University in the UK studying French and English, and I will get my degree before I move there. I know as an EU national I would be entitled to the same "benefits" anyone from Finland is, and this includes whatever fees (or lack of) you pay to get into University.

Ah so you'll be moving "next door" (I live in Kotka, around 60km or so from Kouvola) smile

I'm not sure how many job offerings there might be for you with degrees in French and English (assuming it's linquistics, not translation -- if it's bit of both, I have no idea), but I'm sure it'll be better than nothing by a long shot. I'd wager that you'll have a good chance to get in to some university with those paper though, so I think you're set. biggrin

Captain Rammstein
I know a bit of Swedish, and by a bit I mean only just more than I do Finnish biggrin , but I was told that Finnish people aren't really that keen on speaking it, is this true? If thats the case I wouldn't want to make myself unpopular by speaking it to people rofl

It's true that especially in the Eastern Finland (including Kouvola) Swedish is a bit frowned upon. It's more of resentment towards the Finnish school system where people are forced to learn Swedish and the stereotype of Swedish speaking Finns (finlandssvenskor) thinking they're better than others (pure, genetic jealousy), not as much towards the language itself. Though the more you head west, the more accepted and common the language gets. For example if you travel to Helsinki from here, it's around Pyhtää where you start seeing the bilingual roadsigns and from Ruotsinpyhtää to around Porvoo, the Swedish written before Finnish.

Though if you know Swedish even just a bit better, you might want to learn that while you're learning Finnish, as it might help you if (or more like 'when') you need to fill some forms and such and English is not an option. All official and some of the bit less official forms are provided in Finnish and in Swedish. Though it's entirely optional: you don't need to know a word in Swedish to make it in Finland. Just look at me: most of my school time learning Swedish and the only think I can say is along the lines of inquiring people as to why is there a dog on the table drinking lemonade. sweatdrop
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Though it's entirely optional: you don't need to know a word in Swedish to make it in Finland. Just look at me: most of my school time learning Swedish and the only think I can say is along the lines of inquiring people as to why is there a dog on the table drinking lemonade. sweatdrop

Nyt on ihan pakko kommentoida. Tuo on se ainoa lause jonka minäkään ruotsista enää osaan, kirjaimellisesti. Taisi olla samat oppikirjat meillä. xp


Eipä muuta. Jatkakaa.
Arrowlake Riddler
Nyt on ihan pakko kommentoida. Tuo on se ainoa lause jonka minäkään ruotsista enää osaan, kirjaimellisesti. Taisi olla samat oppikirjat meillä. xp


Eipä muuta. Jatkakaa.

Todennäköisesti, sillä ainakin nuoremmalla isosiskollani oli myös ruotsinkirjoissaan sama lause. Kertoo siis ainakin sen verran että tuo lentävä lause ja ruotsinkielen muhkea on säilynyt halki painoksien ainakin sen kaksi vuotta, ellei jopa pidempäänkin. Yleishyödyllisenä lauseena tämä, ja se miten Maria kertoo lempibändinsä olevan Roxette ovat kyllä ehdottomasti kaikki mitä ruotsinkielestä tulee ikinä tietää.

Noh, Venäjäksi sentään osaan kertoa kuka olen ja missä asun sekä sadatella hieman jos vaikkapa kaikki nyt ei menekään ihan putkeen.
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Captain Rammstein
Thanks alot for the detailed info! To answer one of your questions, I'll be living in Kouvola as that is where my boyfriend lives. I am currently at University in the UK studying French and English, and I will get my degree before I move there. I know as an EU national I would be entitled to the same "benefits" anyone from Finland is, and this includes whatever fees (or lack of) you pay to get into University.

Ah so you'll be moving "next door" (I live in Kotka, around 60km or so from Kouvola) smile

I'm not sure how many job offerings there might be for you with degrees in French and English (assuming it's linquistics, not translation -- if it's bit of both, I have no idea), but I'm sure it'll be better than nothing by a long shot. I'd wager that you'll have a good chance to get in to some university with those paper though, so I think you're set. biggrin

Captain Rammstein
I know a bit of Swedish, and by a bit I mean only just more than I do Finnish biggrin , but I was told that Finnish people aren't really that keen on speaking it, is this true? If thats the case I wouldn't want to make myself unpopular by speaking it to people rofl

It's true that especially in the Eastern Finland (including Kouvola) Swedish is a bit frowned upon. It's more of resentment towards the Finnish school system where people are forced to learn Swedish and the stereotype of Swedish speaking Finns (finlandssvenskor) thinking they're better than others (pure, genetic jealousy), not as much towards the language itself. Though the more you head west, the more accepted and common the language gets. For example if you travel to Helsinki from here, it's around Pyhtää where you start seeing the bilingual roadsigns and from Ruotsinpyhtää to around Porvoo, the Swedish written before Finnish.

Though if you know Swedish even just a bit better, you might want to learn that while you're learning Finnish, as it might help you if (or more like 'when') you need to fill some forms and such and English is not an option. All official and some of the bit less official forms are provided in Finnish and in Swedish. Though it's entirely optional: you don't need to know a word in Swedish to make it in Finland. Just look at me: most of my school time learning Swedish and the only think I can say is along the lines of inquiring people as to why is there a dog on the table drinking lemonade. sweatdrop


Hello soon to be neighbour! biggrin Kouvola is lovely, I really liked it there. It was my boyfriend who told me Swedish wasn't really liked, and he said roughly the same thing as you. The only problem I will have with Swedish, is that my boyfriend only speaks English, Finnish and Russian, so I will most likely never use Swedish within my home life. His parents also speak Russian and Finnish, so I will never use it with them sad

Also with regards to my degree. French is a mixture of linguistics and translation.My English is based on English literature, but then I am a native English speaker!
Captain Rammstein
Hello soon to be neighbour! biggrin Kouvola is lovely, I really liked it there. It was my boyfriend who told me Swedish wasn't really liked, and he said roughly the same thing as you. The only problem I will have with Swedish, is that my boyfriend only speaks English, Finnish and Russian, so I will most likely never use Swedish within my home life. His parents also speak Russian and Finnish, so I will never use it with them sad

Also with regards to my degree. French is a mixture of linguistics and translation.My English is based on English literature, but then I am a native English speaker!

I've always thought Kouvola is a bit gray and... soviet. But that's just me, so pay no heed. sweatdrop

As I said, you should only learn Swedish if you feel you're up to it and think you might be able to learn it while learning Finnish, which you should learn most definitely, if you're thinking about staying a bit longer. It's not required, but can be quite useful at times, though if you have French in the bag, I think you'll do just fine without Swedish. 3nodding

As to the degrees, I don't really have too much information on them. You could alwyas try to get in an university and continue your studies of French, English literature or what not, taking some pedagogical studies and be able to employ yourself as a teacher, teaching either French or English. Or perhaps some translation stuff. You'd have to learn Finnish real good for that one, but it might be possible.

All just thougts though. I'm sure you know better what you want to do in life, I'm just writing down things as they come to mind and putting them out there should you find them useful.
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Captain Rammstein
Hello soon to be neighbour! biggrin Kouvola is lovely, I really liked it there. It was my boyfriend who told me Swedish wasn't really liked, and he said roughly the same thing as you. The only problem I will have with Swedish, is that my boyfriend only speaks English, Finnish and Russian, so I will most likely never use Swedish within my home life. His parents also speak Russian and Finnish, so I will never use it with them sad

Also with regards to my degree. French is a mixture of linguistics and translation.My English is based on English literature, but then I am a native English speaker!

I've always thought Kouvola is a bit gray and... soviet. But that's just me, so pay no heed. sweatdrop

As I said, you should only learn Swedish if you feel you're up to it and think you might be able to learn it while learning Finnish, which you should learn most definitely, if you're thinking about staying a bit longer. It's not required, but can be quite useful at times, though if you have French in the bag, I think you'll do just fine without Swedish. 3nodding

As to the degrees, I don't really have too much information on them. You could alwyas try to get in an university and continue your studies of French, English literature or what not, taking some pedagogical studies and be able to employ yourself as a teacher, teaching either French or English. Or perhaps some translation stuff. You'd have to learn Finnish real good for that one, but it might be possible.

All just thougts though. I'm sure you know better what you want to do in life, I'm just writing down things as they come to mind and putting them out there should you find them useful.


The info is indeed helpful biggrin

And I just liked how quiet Kouvola was, but there was definitely a big Russian population there. I think I'll skip Swedish and go straight for Finnish, let's face it, languages is one of the only things I'm half decent at xD

I did consider teaching English, kind of like private lessons, do you know if there is a need for private tutors in Finland?

If I'm perfectly honest with you, I just love Finland, I loved it the 1st time I went there, I was like *___________________________*
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Inritus_v3


In general you could say that all Finns study two languages - usually English & Swedish. Therefore most of us understand at least some of it. Finland is officially bilingual country but people speaking Swedish as their mother tongue are in a very small minority.
Gess Jahd
Inritus_v3


In general you could say that all Finns study two languages - usually English & Swedish. Therefore most of us understand at least some of it. Finland is officially bilingual country but people speaking Swedish as their mother tongue are in a very small minority.


That makes sense. So do you speak it?
Gess Jahd's avatar

Greedy Hunter

Taxet replies everything too well and I feel very unhelpful for people today. crying
Gess Jahd's avatar

Greedy Hunter

Inritus_v3


Rather badly but yes I do. I've been thinking about starting to learn it again some time soon. I'm at the point where reading and hearing Swedish would do more good than jamming with the grammar.
Gess Jahd
Inritus_v3


Rather badly but yes I do. I've been thinking about starting to learn it again some time soon. I'm at the point where reading and hearing Swedish would do more good than jamming with the grammar.


Ah alright. Well, I've been staying in Pietarsaari and Kokkola mostly, and from what I've seen, many people there speak Swedish. But I've heard that in Eastern Finland it's less common and some Finns actually learn Russian.
Gess Jahd's avatar

Greedy Hunter

Inritus_v3


You've been pretty much exactly at one of the two Finnish-Swedish areas of the country! mrgreen
I have been at Kokkola for countless of times since it's one of the closest cities to my past home town. 3nodding

Yeah, Russian is learnt more on the Eastern Finland. In most of Finland they find it weird to even study Swedish when they don't hear it on regular basis downtown and so.

Finns are actually rather active on studying languages. For example I've studied German and Latin on top of Swedish and English. Mmh, yeah, French and German are also popular languages to study and Spanish is growing in popularity all the time. In universities many choose Chinese or Japanese optionally. I want to learn the earlier languages better & start Finnish Sign Language. Sigh, so much I'd like to learn! ^^
Gess Jahd
Inritus_v3


You've been pretty much exactly at one of the two Finnish-Swedish areas of the country! mrgreen
I have been at Kokkola for countless of times since it's one of the closest cities to my past home town. 3nodding

Yeah, Russian is learnt more on the Eastern Finland. In most of Finland they find it weird to even study Swedish when they don't hear it on regular basis downtown and so.

Finns are actually rather active on studying languages. For example I've studied German and Latin on top of Swedish and English. Mmh, yeah, French and German are also popular languages to study and Spanish is growing in popularity all the time. In universities many choose Chinese or Japanese optionally. I want to learn the earlier languages better & start Finnish Sign Language. Sigh, so much I'd like to learn! ^^


Well you seem young and motivated enough, so plenty of time for that. I wish you the best of luck.
Are you also interested in history or just languages?

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