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atnegam's avatar

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Are your eyes offended when you see h-u-m-o-r?

I am American and my eyes are not offended at your spelling. I am just hoping the feeling is mutual.
indiadoctor's avatar

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atnegam
Are your eyes offended when you see h-u-m-o-r?

I am American and my eyes are not offended at your spelling. I am just hoping the feeling is mutual.


the modern days have brought us Mobile chatting and internet chatting. this made the spelling even more different.

anyhow... British/Indian style adds a U into it. right?

my personal comments: .. Reserved ...

biggrin mrgreen
atnegam's avatar

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indiadoctor
atnegam
Are your eyes offended when you see h-u-m-o-r?

I am American and my eyes are not offended at your spelling. I am just hoping the feeling is mutual.


the modern days have brought us Mobile chatting and internet chatting. this made the spelling even more different.

anyhow... British/Indian style adds a U into it. right?

my personal comments: .. Reserved ...

biggrin mrgreen


Yes. And Australia, I think.
indiadoctor's avatar

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Does Australia follow British style or American? ... i truly don't know....
atnegam's avatar

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Australia is another b*****d child of England. They have their own culture. I have a hard time calling them "like" England or "like USA" but they do have the metric system
I spell it like that, humour, favour, favourite, etc.
Canada uses that way of spelling too. Though we switch between them both ;;
IxianMace's avatar

Spotter

I live in Australia, and I've always spelled humour with a u in it. I'm not offended when I see humour spelt as humor. neutral
I live in america, and get offended when someone adds a 'u' into a word that "shouldn't", until I realize that other countries spell certain words differently.
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atnegam
Australia is another b*****d child of England. They have their own culture. I have a hard time calling them "like" England or "like USA" but they do have the metric system

All countries in the world except the US uses Metric system.... they're not all b*****d child of England
Born Backwards's avatar

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IxianMace
I live in Australia, and I've always spelled humour with a u in it. I'm not offended when I see humour spelt as humor. neutral
Caerthakatha's avatar

Dangerous Loiterer

      Anybody who claims that either version is 'wrong' needs a bloody good slap around the face
      and a history lesson. Both are perfectly valid and credible: 'honor', for example, is the elder and the
      original version, but 'honour' is a remnant of our Anglo-Saxon pronunciation. To deny 'honour' is to
      deny the word's etymological leap into English; to deny 'honor' is to deny its linguistic source.

      The words would be easily recognisable to any native Latin speaker (despite the minor problem
      of them being non-existent). It would be common sense to see that they are the same word. We
      have no problem recognising the words Japanese absorbs from Western languages: it's plain to
      see that 'intaanetto' is 'Internet' modified to allow Japanese to pronounce it, in the same way that
      'culur' was the Anglo-Saxon's new 'color'. Nothing irks me more than self-assured gits telling people
      that 'colour' and 'honour' is incorrect when each was firmly established in English a thousand years
      or more before modern America was even discovered. No matter how it's spelt, 'culur' is still the
      best Anglicisation — I've never heard anybody saying 'coh-lorr'. Had it not been for the Vowel Shift
      in the 14th Century, we would probably be spelling it without 'o's.

      I think that loanwords shouldn't necessarily be identical to their original foreign forms: we need a
      unique spelling to assimilate the word into our language, so that it isn't regarded as a 'foreign' word.
      Once 'color' has become 'culur', it isn't easily mixed up with the Latin. It becomes an English word
      and can start to evolve back into its original form once it is firmly anchored. So we get 'colour', which
      is halfway between 'culur' and 'color', and finally 'color'.

      If it's shoe-horned into the language, it won't become 'English'. It'll always be a foreign word. You can
      tell the words that have achieved 'English' status, because they're the ones that you have to remind
      people about. You always get the people asking what bungalow is in two or three of the languages
      of India (pro tip: it's baṅgalo and baṅglā).

      I can keep using fantastique in an English sentence all I want, but somebody is going to ask me why
      I'm using French words in place of a perfectly good Anglicisation. Even the most simple person can
      see it's almost identical to 'fantastic' and will probably automatically translate it to that, but the difference
      is that we know it's French because of its spelling.

      There's a good argument for both sides of the argument, but as somebody who treasures our heritage
      and finds it fascinating how we can understand texts written hundreds of years ago, I would prefer it
      that Britain doesn't give in to pressure and keeps its spelling rules. It's a reminder of how its people
      formed its language, which America tries desperately to hide. America doesn't need to remind people
      of Anglo-Saxon history because they purposefully changed to the Latin forms to distance themselves.
      They were a new people who didn't need to use Anglo-Saxon remnants and who could be open to
      new cultures. Considering what a melting-pot of culture America has become, it's better for them.

      / linguistic student blabbering and general off-topic.
RyouIshtar's avatar

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I don't but it makes a fun bash topic between friends of mine from Canada and England when we go and bash each other's countries for fun XD
waterrock's avatar

Ruthless Flatterer

Born Backwards
IxianMace
I live in Australia, and I've always spelled humour with a u in it. I'm not offended when I see humour spelt as humor. neutral

^ This.
Except I'm in America and I talk to a lot of friends that use the U too.
I spell it humour, I'm Canadian we spell everything with a U. Favourite, colour, etc.

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