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geminikitten
Koalalion
geminikitten
I don't think it's religious as much as it's more extreme in their views. Even the US left-wingers are extreme by other countries' views who tend to be centrists. It seems more cultural and religious.

actually even the u.s. left wing looks right wing by more centrist countries, that is because the u.s. is a bit to the right of the middle as opposed to the left.
strictly speaking you are thinking of countries with a narrower political spectrum xp essentially with a smaller standard deviation.


We do have far left and far right. I speak of more experience with Australian, German, Thai, Indonesian and Japanese politics (and if you want to count some of the Middle Eastern ones too) and a little bit of other countries.
Left wingers are seen more as liberal but too liberal. The problem most nations see is the extremism in itself rather than the views. We do see them as right wing in the sense that they are just as extreme.

Germany isn't very representative for sure, unless you're talking about beaurocracies in which case it's on the apply very liberally end.
Germany is generally speaking overly concerned about extremism, probably to point we're everything ociffies, and disagreements between the furthest corners of the political spectrum around the center itself result in accusations of extremism.
hyperbole if any is inadvertent, however saying overly concerned isn't an overstatement. about the other countries I don't know how representative they are.
countries also vary in how much political diversity in point by point fundamental beliefs they are willing to accept or even their tolerance of criticism. American liberals of course might be to much about freedom of speech, according to the rest of the world(It’s part of the political culture).
I didn't mean to say that you don't have far left or far right but rather than what is in the united states far left would be relatively speaking closer to the center left, however that doesn't say much about america or the rest of the world to be honest.
It also doesn't tell you wether the person is actually supporting a world view which is totalitarian or one which seeks to find great consensus, overall it's surprisingly uninformative in my opinion.
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Jessi Danger
scacchic
Initiate_Sacred_Demise
We aren't. In France it is illegal to wear hijabs to public schools. America is very open to religion or non-religion.

America is not open to non-religion, don't spew propaganda you've heard all your life.


America the government is open to non-religious people. Americans are not necessarily going to be as accepting.
I wouldn't say this wholeheartedly, as there are a handful of states that forbid anyone who is not religious from serving on their state legislature. I know Maryland is among them. Beyond that, much of the social and political climate of the US as a whole doesn't accept people who are non-religious, as demonstrated by the constant push against things that are otherwise sensible (like removing 'under God' from the pledge of allegiance and 'In God We Trust' from our currency, measures that were introduced during the Cold War) because if they ARE removed it's seen as 'evil' or otherwise wrong.
Sure, it's not all 50 states and it's not the whole of any individual state, but it certainly doesn't preclude the aura of true religious indifference like people want to think there is just because it's one of our supposed values.
Le Scratch
Jessi Danger
scacchic
Initiate_Sacred_Demise
We aren't. In France it is illegal to wear hijabs to public schools. America is very open to religion or non-religion.

America is not open to non-religion, don't spew propaganda you've heard all your life.


America the government is open to non-religious people. Americans are not necessarily going to be as accepting.
I wouldn't say this wholeheartedly, as there are a handful of states that forbid anyone who is not religious from serving on their state legislature. I know Maryland is among them. Beyond that, much of the social and political climate of the US as a whole doesn't accept people who are non-religious, as demonstrated by the constant push against things that are otherwise sensible (like removing 'under God' from the pledge of allegiance and 'In God We Trust' from our currency, measures that were introduced during the Cold War) because if they ARE removed it's seen as 'evil' or otherwise wrong.
Sure, it's not all 50 states and it's not the whole of any individual state, but it certainly doesn't preclude the aura of true religious indifference like people want to think there is just because it's one of our supposed values.

Isn't that unconstitutional in the united states?

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