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FAT Princess?

yes 0.44736842105263 44.7% [ 85 ]
no 0.41052631578947 41.1% [ 78 ]
you're awful for judging us fatties we can't help it except we can 0.14210526315789 14.2% [ 27 ]
Total Votes:[ 190 ]
< 1 2 3 ... 15 16 17 18 19 >
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal

Only too easy?
Hyperthyroidism - Less than 1%.
Genetics - According to wikipedia, it states that genetics shows a whopping 6-80% range, simply because just about all studies offered are flawed in almost every aspect. The studies that offer any high percentages ignore actual genetics almost entirely, attempting to convince the readers of the studies that the lifestyle habits are unrelated. Realistically, genetics offer next to nil explanation as for why someone cannot lose weight by natural means. Just about everyone can, should they actually put in the effort.
Growth Hormone Overproduction - You can count this (less than 1%), but you'll have a good deal of more problems than weight gain...
Diabetes - It affects 7.8% of US population, however, this doesn't mean that they are all overweight. Percentage of people who have diabetes are easily assumed less than half of those with diabetes. I'll chalk this up to personal interactions. Keep in mind, however, that a good percentages of diabetes cases are caused by obesity, not the other way around.
Cushing's Syndrome - Currently, no data is offered about how many people are affected by Cushing's Syndrome. The percentage is merely stated as being 'Uncommon'. It's fair to assume that less than 1 out of every 1000 people have this disease. That is also being overly generous with the numbers. I'm sure it's closer to around 1 out of every 1 million.

- The more weight you gain, the more your body needs to adjust to losing this weight (where as previously, the effort was nonexistent). People who fail to lose weight do just that, fail. The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems. The only one that was left out was allergies, but only because it is so incredibly rare. My fathers sister couldn't drink so much as water without bloating beyond an unnatural size. She died before the turned 5, so I understand it.

HYPOthyroidism is what you wanted to cite. Just letting you know. Hyperthyroidism is an over-active thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism is an under-active thyroid gland. (You'll see in my link and in your link, a symptom of hyperthyroidism is weight loss. A symptom of hypothyroidism is weight gain.)

And 1 in 500 people in the US have hypothyroidism. (See, my link.)


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1% of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. It's a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasn't that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
(I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but you've already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
I've already posted this story, but I'll write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she can't really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. It's been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now she's really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she can't lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
I'm only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I can't even stand anymore. She can't. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I can't say it's her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I can't say it's her fault that she can't really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I don't know how common her experiences are, and I'm not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people (including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and it's painful to move them too much. She's the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, she's also the fattest so I'd use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasn't included in the above things you mentioned (which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop


The first thing I'd like to know is if she was overweight prior to the accident.

The above examples I gave were solely about disease. Accidents are entirely circumstantial. Your body can fix a bone naturally, not disease. However, even still, she struggles no more than you. I can easily tell you that she's already eating wrong if she's overweight. It's the same concept as working out and lifting weights. You don't grow more muscle fibers (you can, but that's not the point), but the fibers merely grow in size, which requires more calories to use in order to maintain these larger muscle fibers. If you suddenly stop working out, these fibers shrink, leading to the common misconception that muscle turns into fat (which is false). The reason people believe this is because they fail to accommodate their new calorie burn rate, which is lessoned due to a lack of need to sustain the muscles. Thus, such people are eating more than they should, as they are used to eating a certain way.
The same goes for your friend. You can remain entirely stationary all your life and remain of average body weight. Examples? There are plenty of people who are limited to chairs all their lives, and none of them that are notable right off of my head are remotely overweight. The only ones that are are simply being fed too much or are affected by medication (which gains weight). Then again, she also might be taking medication that is aiding her weight gain. Look into it.

Lastly, she can exercise in a pool. A lot of elderly do this because of their sensitive joints. Something little is better than nothing at all.


Actually it is easy to become overweight when you can't move normally as I said in my case. I was eating a very strict 1200 calorie diet as monitored by my doctors while going through physical therapy and I gained 30 lbs over the course of a year. The doctors did not want me eating any less than that though and said I shouldn't try to diet to lose the weight but that I would be able to lose it easily when I got back to normal activities and they were right. Like I said, I weight 115 now, so back then I was only 145, but that is considered overweight for a girl my size.
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal

Only too easy?
Hyperthyroidism - Less than 1%.
Genetics - According to wikipedia, it states that genetics shows a whopping 6-80% range, simply because just about all studies offered are flawed in almost every aspect. The studies that offer any high percentages ignore actual genetics almost entirely, attempting to convince the readers of the studies that the lifestyle habits are unrelated. Realistically, genetics offer next to nil explanation as for why someone cannot lose weight by natural means. Just about everyone can, should they actually put in the effort.
Growth Hormone Overproduction - You can count this (less than 1%), but you'll have a good deal of more problems than weight gain...
Diabetes - It affects 7.8% of US population, however, this doesn't mean that they are all overweight. Percentage of people who have diabetes are easily assumed less than half of those with diabetes. I'll chalk this up to personal interactions. Keep in mind, however, that a good percentages of diabetes cases are caused by obesity, not the other way around.
Cushing's Syndrome - Currently, no data is offered about how many people are affected by Cushing's Syndrome. The percentage is merely stated as being 'Uncommon'. It's fair to assume that less than 1 out of every 1000 people have this disease. That is also being overly generous with the numbers. I'm sure it's closer to around 1 out of every 1 million.

- The more weight you gain, the more your body needs to adjust to losing this weight (where as previously, the effort was nonexistent). People who fail to lose weight do just that, fail. The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems. The only one that was left out was allergies, but only because it is so incredibly rare. My fathers sister couldn't drink so much as water without bloating beyond an unnatural size. She died before the turned 5, so I understand it.

HYPOthyroidism is what you wanted to cite. Just letting you know. Hyperthyroidism is an over-active thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism is an under-active thyroid gland. (You'll see in my link and in your link, a symptom of hyperthyroidism is weight loss. A symptom of hypothyroidism is weight gain.)

And 1 in 500 people in the US have hypothyroidism. (See, my link.)


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1% of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. It's a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasn't that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
(I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but you've already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
I've already posted this story, but I'll write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she can't really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. It's been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now she's really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she can't lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
I'm only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I can't even stand anymore. She can't. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I can't say it's her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I can't say it's her fault that she can't really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I don't know how common her experiences are, and I'm not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people (including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and it's painful to move them too much. She's the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, she's also the fattest so I'd use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasn't included in the above things you mentioned (which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop


The first thing I'd like to know is if she was overweight prior to the accident.

The above examples I gave were solely about disease. Accidents are entirely circumstantial. Your body can fix a bone naturally, not disease. However, even still, she struggles no more than you. I can easily tell you that she's already eating wrong if she's overweight. It's the same concept as working out and lifting weights. You don't grow more muscle fibers (you can, but that's not the point), but the fibers merely grow in size, which requires more calories to use in order to maintain these larger muscle fibers. If you suddenly stop working out, these fibers shrink, leading to the common misconception that muscle turns into fat (which is false). The reason people believe this is because they fail to accommodate their new calorie burn rate, which is lessoned due to a lack of need to sustain the muscles. Thus, such people are eating more than they should, as they are used to eating a certain way.
The same goes for your friend. You can remain entirely stationary all your life and remain of average body weight. Examples? There are plenty of people who are limited to chairs all their lives, and none of them that are notable right off of my head are remotely overweight. The only ones that are are simply being fed too much or are affected by medication (which gains weight). Then again, she also might be taking medication that is aiding her weight gain. Look into it.

Lastly, she can exercise in a pool. A lot of elderly do this because of their sensitive joints. Something little is better than nothing at all.

Not really.
She has metal plates and pins where her breaks were, save for the one in her ankle. Is this the right circumstance for you? Because that doesn't sound too natural to me.
Forgive me if I thought you giving a list and saying "The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems" meant "The ONLY people who cannot really lose weight, or at least ACTUALLY struggle to do so, are those with the ABOVE STATED PROBLEMS." cat_confused
Certainly. She may have been eating the same while she couldn't move. She could have been eating more, less. I'm not sure. She also may have been taking that medication then. It's been 6 years, she isn't now. She takes OTC anti-inflamitories when she hurts. That's it. None of my point is about how she gained the weight. It's her ability to lose the weight. I explained the situation when she gained the weight and the situation she is now (which, you know, are hand in hand.) That's why all of the questions I asked you after I explained this was about losing weight. Whatever means she gained weight, whether it was eating too much while not being able to move or medication, she's not in that situation anymore. She can move and she's not on medicine.
She could certainly exercise in a pool in the summer. And does. A lot. But there's snow outside and the nearest indoor pool is a 45 minute drive or a two hour bus ride away. That's not easy, that's hardly anything near convenient, it's time and money consuming to even get to a place where she can exercise a little bit.
Again, is she a failure for not being able to lose weight? Could you say that she actually struggles to lose weight? Do you think she can actually lose a significant amount of weight in her situation (even just getting to a point where she is not considered obese anymore, even if she's still overweight?) (Barring any gastrointestinal surgeries, anyone can lose weight that way.) Again, I'm talking about her weight loss not gain.
Sergeant Pancakebatter
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal

Only too easy?
Hyperthyroidism - Less than 1%.
Genetics - According to wikipedia, it states that genetics shows a whopping 6-80% range, simply because just about all studies offered are flawed in almost every aspect. The studies that offer any high percentages ignore actual genetics almost entirely, attempting to convince the readers of the studies that the lifestyle habits are unrelated. Realistically, genetics offer next to nil explanation as for why someone cannot lose weight by natural means. Just about everyone can, should they actually put in the effort.
Growth Hormone Overproduction - You can count this (less than 1%), but you'll have a good deal of more problems than weight gain...
Diabetes - It affects 7.8% of US population, however, this doesn't mean that they are all overweight. Percentage of people who have diabetes are easily assumed less than half of those with diabetes. I'll chalk this up to personal interactions. Keep in mind, however, that a good percentages of diabetes cases are caused by obesity, not the other way around.
Cushing's Syndrome - Currently, no data is offered about how many people are affected by Cushing's Syndrome. The percentage is merely stated as being 'Uncommon'. It's fair to assume that less than 1 out of every 1000 people have this disease. That is also being overly generous with the numbers. I'm sure it's closer to around 1 out of every 1 million.

- The more weight you gain, the more your body needs to adjust to losing this weight (where as previously, the effort was nonexistent). People who fail to lose weight do just that, fail. The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems. The only one that was left out was allergies, but only because it is so incredibly rare. My fathers sister couldn't drink so much as water without bloating beyond an unnatural size. She died before the turned 5, so I understand it.

HYPOthyroidism is what you wanted to cite. Just letting you know. Hyperthyroidism is an over-active thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism is an under-active thyroid gland. (You'll see in my link and in your link, a symptom of hyperthyroidism is weight loss. A symptom of hypothyroidism is weight gain.)

And 1 in 500 people in the US have hypothyroidism. (See, my link.)


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1% of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. It's a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasn't that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
(I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but you've already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
I've already posted this story, but I'll write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she can't really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. It's been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now she's really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she can't lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
I'm only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I can't even stand anymore. She can't. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I can't say it's her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I can't say it's her fault that she can't really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I don't know how common her experiences are, and I'm not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people (including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and it's painful to move them too much. She's the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, she's also the fattest so I'd use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasn't included in the above things you mentioned (which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop
Thank you. I have always been very trim but there was a period of time where I became overweight due to a disorder I have. My disorder causes me terrible pain and my joints dislocate very easily. I have multiple partial dislocations on a daily basis. The pain and fear of dislocating kept me from being active. I had to go through physical therapy to ease me through the transition and in the mean time gained 30 pounds even though I stuck to a low calorie diet. Now I am actually able to move though I can still dislocate but I lost all the weight and now stand ad 115 lbs at 5'2.5. Still sometimes I get made fun of by people who don't know about my disorder because I swell a lot due to the partial dislocations and it can make me look chunky. I lost the weight for me. I was an active person prior to my diagnosis and didn't want to lose that part of me. I don't expect anyone with a disorder like mine or any disorder that causes them constant pain to be active like me... some days are absolute hell. People always make assumptions about other people, especially about weight, without ever knowing the reason that person is the way they are. sweatdrop

Yes certainly. My friends ankle and knee swell like hell when she's moved on them too much. Which causes them to hurt, which causes her not to want to move on them until the swelling goes down. Which is days sometimes, as I bet you know. I do know the doctors told her that she probably wont be able to run again. I don't exactly know why, it might be the metal plates and pins in her knee, I haven't asked her. She was devastated to hear that and it's a bit of a sensitive subject. She pretty much had to learn to walk again and she was very proud of herself when she was able to walk all by herself onto the stage at graduation. cat_crying
Anyway. I'm almost 100% sure people think that my friend has trouble walking because of her weight or she has a handicapped sticker (which she only uses when she's swelling since she's in a lot of pain) because of her weight. Hate those people. emotion_facepalm
You have no idea how many men love thick women.
To be fair to Di$ney it has it's fair share of fat characters, if I recall one of the fairies in Sleeping beauty is overweight.
Sergeant Pancakebatter
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal

Only too easy?
Hyperthyroidism - Less than 1%.
Genetics - According to wikipedia, it states that genetics shows a whopping 6-80% range, simply because just about all studies offered are flawed in almost every aspect. The studies that offer any high percentages ignore actual genetics almost entirely, attempting to convince the readers of the studies that the lifestyle habits are unrelated. Realistically, genetics offer next to nil explanation as for why someone cannot lose weight by natural means. Just about everyone can, should they actually put in the effort.
Growth Hormone Overproduction - You can count this (less than 1%), but you'll have a good deal of more problems than weight gain...
Diabetes - It affects 7.8% of US population, however, this doesn't mean that they are all overweight. Percentage of people who have diabetes are easily assumed less than half of those with diabetes. I'll chalk this up to personal interactions. Keep in mind, however, that a good percentages of diabetes cases are caused by obesity, not the other way around.
Cushing's Syndrome - Currently, no data is offered about how many people are affected by Cushing's Syndrome. The percentage is merely stated as being 'Uncommon'. It's fair to assume that less than 1 out of every 1000 people have this disease. That is also being overly generous with the numbers. I'm sure it's closer to around 1 out of every 1 million.

- The more weight you gain, the more your body needs to adjust to losing this weight (where as previously, the effort was nonexistent). People who fail to lose weight do just that, fail. The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems. The only one that was left out was allergies, but only because it is so incredibly rare. My fathers sister couldn't drink so much as water without bloating beyond an unnatural size. She died before the turned 5, so I understand it.

HYPOthyroidism is what you wanted to cite. Just letting you know. Hyperthyroidism is an over-active thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism is an under-active thyroid gland. (You'll see in my link and in your link, a symptom of hyperthyroidism is weight loss. A symptom of hypothyroidism is weight gain.)

And 1 in 500 people in the US have hypothyroidism. (See, my link.)


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1% of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. It's a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasn't that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
(I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but you've already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
I've already posted this story, but I'll write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she can't really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. It's been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now she's really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she can't lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
I'm only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I can't even stand anymore. She can't. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I can't say it's her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I can't say it's her fault that she can't really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I don't know how common her experiences are, and I'm not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people (including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and it's painful to move them too much. She's the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, she's also the fattest so I'd use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasn't included in the above things you mentioned (which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop


The first thing I'd like to know is if she was overweight prior to the accident.

The above examples I gave were solely about disease. Accidents are entirely circumstantial. Your body can fix a bone naturally, not disease. However, even still, she struggles no more than you. I can easily tell you that she's already eating wrong if she's overweight. It's the same concept as working out and lifting weights. You don't grow more muscle fibers (you can, but that's not the point), but the fibers merely grow in size, which requires more calories to use in order to maintain these larger muscle fibers. If you suddenly stop working out, these fibers shrink, leading to the common misconception that muscle turns into fat (which is false). The reason people believe this is because they fail to accommodate their new calorie burn rate, which is lessoned due to a lack of need to sustain the muscles. Thus, such people are eating more than they should, as they are used to eating a certain way.
The same goes for your friend. You can remain entirely stationary all your life and remain of average body weight. Examples? There are plenty of people who are limited to chairs all their lives, and none of them that are notable right off of my head are remotely overweight. The only ones that are are simply being fed too much or are affected by medication (which gains weight). Then again, she also might be taking medication that is aiding her weight gain. Look into it.

Lastly, she can exercise in a pool. A lot of elderly do this because of their sensitive joints. Something little is better than nothing at all.


Actually it is easy to become overweight when you can't move normally as I said in my case. I was eating a very strict 1200 calorie diet as monitored by my doctors while going through physical therapy and I gained 30 lbs over the course of a year. The doctors did not want me eating any less than that though and said I shouldn't try to diet to lose the weight but that I would be able to lose it easily when I got back to normal activities and they were right. Like I said, I weight 115 now, so back then I was only 145, but that is considered overweight for a girl my size.


You're entirely right, it is. However, just because it's easy to gain weight does not mean that it's difficult to maintain a lower weight.

A quote from a doctor was the following: "Doctors assume half the s**t that comes out of their mouths. It's all based on numbers, really. After that, it's a guessing game. Why do you think it's so expensive?"
Vizal
Sergeant Pancakebatter
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1 of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. Its a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasnt that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but youve already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
Ive already posted this story, but Ill write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she cant really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. Its been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now shes really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she cant lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
Im only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I cant even stand anymore. She cant. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I cant say its her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I cant say its her fault that she cant really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I dont know how common her experiences are, and Im not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and its painful to move them too much. Shes the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, shes also the fattest so Id use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasnt included in the above things you mentioned which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop


The first thing Id like to know is if she was overweight prior to the accident.

The above examples I gave were solely about disease. Accidents are entirely circumstantial. Your body can fix a bone naturally, not disease. However, even still, she struggles no more than you. I can easily tell you that shes already eating wrong if shes overweight. Its the same concept as working out and lifting weights. You dont grow more muscle fibers you can, but thats not the point), but the fibers merely grow in size, which requires more calories to use in order to maintain these larger muscle fibers. If you suddenly stop working out, these fibers shrink, leading to the common misconception that muscle turns into fat which is false). The reason people believe this is because they fail to accommodate their new calorie burn rate, which is lessoned due to a lack of need to sustain the muscles. Thus, such people are eating more than they should, as they are used to eating a certain way.
The same goes for your friend. You can remain entirely stationary all your life and remain of average body weight. Examples? There are plenty of people who are limited to chairs all their lives, and none of them that are notable right off of my head are remotely overweight. The only ones that are are simply being fed too much or are affected by medication which gains weight). Then again, she also might be taking medication that is aiding her weight gain. Look into it.

Lastly, she can exercise in a pool. A lot of elderly do this because of their sensitive joints. Something little is better than nothing at all.


Actually it is easy to become overweight when you cant move normally as I said in my case. I was eating a very strict 1200 calorie diet as monitored by my doctors while going through physical therapy and I gained 30 lbs over the course of a year. The doctors did not want me eating any less than that though and said I shouldnt try to diet to lose the weight but that I would be able to lose it easily when I got back to normal activities and they were right. Like I said, I weight 115 now, so back then I was only 145, but that is considered overweight for a girl my size.


Youre entirely right, it is. However, just because its easy to gain weight does not mean that its difficult to maintain a lower weight.

A quote from a doctor was the following: Doctors assume half the s**t that comes out of their mouths. Its all based on numbers, really. After that, its a guessing game. Why do you think its so expensive?
how would you suggest a person who cannot excercise due to a disability and who is on an already restricted diet maintain a lower weight? I was already only eating 1200 calories
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal

Only too easy?
Hyperthyroidism - Less than 1%.
Genetics - According to wikipedia, it states that genetics shows a whopping 6-80% range, simply because just about all studies offered are flawed in almost every aspect. The studies that offer any high percentages ignore actual genetics almost entirely, attempting to convince the readers of the studies that the lifestyle habits are unrelated. Realistically, genetics offer next to nil explanation as for why someone cannot lose weight by natural means. Just about everyone can, should they actually put in the effort.
Growth Hormone Overproduction - You can count this (less than 1%), but you'll have a good deal of more problems than weight gain...
Diabetes - It affects 7.8% of US population, however, this doesn't mean that they are all overweight. Percentage of people who have diabetes are easily assumed less than half of those with diabetes. I'll chalk this up to personal interactions. Keep in mind, however, that a good percentages of diabetes cases are caused by obesity, not the other way around.
Cushing's Syndrome - Currently, no data is offered about how many people are affected by Cushing's Syndrome. The percentage is merely stated as being 'Uncommon'. It's fair to assume that less than 1 out of every 1000 people have this disease. That is also being overly generous with the numbers. I'm sure it's closer to around 1 out of every 1 million.

- The more weight you gain, the more your body needs to adjust to losing this weight (where as previously, the effort was nonexistent). People who fail to lose weight do just that, fail. The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems. The only one that was left out was allergies, but only because it is so incredibly rare. My fathers sister couldn't drink so much as water without bloating beyond an unnatural size. She died before the turned 5, so I understand it.

HYPOthyroidism is what you wanted to cite. Just letting you know. Hyperthyroidism is an over-active thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism is an under-active thyroid gland. (You'll see in my link and in your link, a symptom of hyperthyroidism is weight loss. A symptom of hypothyroidism is weight gain.)

And 1 in 500 people in the US have hypothyroidism. (See, my link.)


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1% of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. It's a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasn't that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
(I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but you've already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
I've already posted this story, but I'll write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she can't really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. It's been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now she's really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she can't lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
I'm only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I can't even stand anymore. She can't. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I can't say it's her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I can't say it's her fault that she can't really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I don't know how common her experiences are, and I'm not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people (including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and it's painful to move them too much. She's the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, she's also the fattest so I'd use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasn't included in the above things you mentioned (which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop


The first thing I'd like to know is if she was overweight prior to the accident.

The above examples I gave were solely about disease. Accidents are entirely circumstantial. Your body can fix a bone naturally, not disease. However, even still, she struggles no more than you. I can easily tell you that she's already eating wrong if she's overweight. It's the same concept as working out and lifting weights. You don't grow more muscle fibers (you can, but that's not the point), but the fibers merely grow in size, which requires more calories to use in order to maintain these larger muscle fibers. If you suddenly stop working out, these fibers shrink, leading to the common misconception that muscle turns into fat (which is false). The reason people believe this is because they fail to accommodate their new calorie burn rate, which is lessoned due to a lack of need to sustain the muscles. Thus, such people are eating more than they should, as they are used to eating a certain way.
The same goes for your friend. You can remain entirely stationary all your life and remain of average body weight. Examples? There are plenty of people who are limited to chairs all their lives, and none of them that are notable right off of my head are remotely overweight. The only ones that are are simply being fed too much or are affected by medication (which gains weight). Then again, she also might be taking medication that is aiding her weight gain. Look into it.

Lastly, she can exercise in a pool. A lot of elderly do this because of their sensitive joints. Something little is better than nothing at all.


Not really.
She has metal plates and pins where her breaks were, save for the one in her ankle. Is this the right circumstance for you? Because that doesn't sound too natural to me.
Forgive me if I thought you giving a list and saying "The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems" meant "The ONLY people who cannot really lose weight, or at least ACTUALLY struggle to do so, are those with the ABOVE STATED PROBLEMS." cat_confused
Certainly. She may have been eating the same while she couldn't move. She could have been eating more, less. I'm not sure. She also may have been taking that medication then. It's been 6 years, she isn't now. She takes OTC anti-inflamitories when she hurts. That's it. None of my point is about how she gained the weight. It's her ability to lose the weight. I explained the situation when she gained the weight and the situation she is now (which, you know, are hand in hand.) That's why all of the questions I asked you after I explained this was about losing weight. Whatever means she gained weight, whether it was eating too much while not being able to move or medication, she's not in that situation anymore. She can move and she's not on medicine.
She could certainly exercise in a pool in the summer. And does. A lot. But there's snow outside and the nearest indoor pool is a 45 minute drive or a two hour bus ride away. That's not easy, that's hardly anything near convenient, it's time and money consuming to even get to a place where she can exercise a little bit.
Again, is she a failure for not being able to lose weight? Could you say that she actually struggles to lose weight? Do you think she can actually lose a significant amount of weight in her situation (even just getting to a point where she is not considered obese anymore, even if she's still overweight?) (Barring any gastrointestinal surgeries, anyone can lose weight that way.) Again, I'm talking about her weight loss not gain.


Despite what people think, how someone obtained the weight is very much an important part of this. You cannot sympathize with someone nearly on the same level for their joint and back pains from weight gain simply because of poor life decisions over someone who is in the same position, but due to a disease that is near uncontrollable.

So it was pretty much a half baked list. Of course there are always special cases and circumstances that are relevant. However, a very important difference would be that if someone is in pain, it does not inhibit them from working out to a certain degree. Even those who are bed ridden are capable of burning the same calories as they take in, so excuses are rather limited. My brother, for instance, has four metal rods and a few metal plates in his body. He was snowboarding and had a terrible introduction with a few boulders and trees. He gained a little weight afterwards due to his inability to really move, though he never got anything near overweight. So, instead of being the ripped muscle guy he was, he had a little fat (which was merely covering up his musles) on his body than what he was used to. He was still of a healthy weight despite all of this.
To be perfectly honest, it's just as I said. There really are very few excuses for gaining weight, which tend to be the same reasons it is difficult to lose weight. Medicine was an example. Beyond that, you're still in control.
Your case is obviously different, as you have a disease. She does not. She has injuries, just as many before and after her have, yet they were capable of maintaining their weight for the most part. Fifteen pound gain is almost to be expected, but beyond this is just lacking control. Now, for those people who gain weight from injuries, they could probably be a little more educated in changing their eating habits so they don't find themselves 50lbs heavier than a month ago.

So, to sum that all up, how one gains weight has everything to do with losing weight. If you don't gain weight, there is none to be lost. If you find the reason, you can stop and reverse it.
Ms Ragnarok
Sergeant Pancakebatter
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal

Only too easy?
Hyperthyroidism - Less than 1.
Genetics - According to wikipedia, it states that genetics shows a whopping 6-80 range, simply because just about all studies offered are flawed in almost every aspect. The studies that offer any high percentages ignore actual genetics almost entirely, attempting to convince the readers of the studies that the lifestyle habits are unrelated. Realistically, genetics offer next to nil explanation as for why someone cannot lose weight by natural means. Just about everyone can, should they actually put in the effort.
Growth Hormone Overproduction - You can count this less than 1), but youll have a good deal of more problems than weight gain...
Diabetes - It affects 7.8 of US population, however, this doesnt mean that they are all overweight. Percentage of people who have diabetes are easily assumed less than half of those with diabetes. Ill chalk this up to personal interactions. Keep in mind, however, that a good percentages of diabetes cases are caused by obesity, not the other way around.
Cushings Syndrome - Currently, no data is offered about how many people are affected by Cushings Syndrome. The percentage is merely stated as being Uncommon. Its fair to assume that less than 1 out of every 1000 people have this disease. That is also being overly generous with the numbers. Im sure its closer to around 1 out of every 1 million.

- The more weight you gain, the more your body needs to adjust to losing this weight where as previously, the effort was nonexistent). People who fail to lose weight do just that, fail. The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems. The only one that was left out was allergies, but only because it is so incredibly rare. My fathers sister couldnt drink so much as water without bloating beyond an unnatural size. She died before the turned 5, so I understand it.

HYPOthyroidism is what you wanted to cite. Just letting you know. Hyperthyroidism is an over-active thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism is an under-active thyroid gland. Youll see in my link and in your link, a symptom of hyperthyroidism is weight loss. A symptom of hypothyroidism is weight gain.)

And 1 in 500 people in the US have hypothyroidism. See, my link.)


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1 of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. Its a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasnt that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but youve already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
Ive already posted this story, but Ill write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she cant really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. Its been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now shes really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she cant lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
Im only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I cant even stand anymore. She cant. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I cant say its her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I cant say its her fault that she cant really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I dont know how common her experiences are, and Im not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and its painful to move them too much. Shes the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, shes also the fattest so Id use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasnt included in the above things you mentioned which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop
Thank you. I have always been very trim but there was a period of time where I became overweight due to a disorder I have. My disorder causes me terrible pain and my joints dislocate very easily. I have multiple partial dislocations on a daily basis. The pain and fear of dislocating kept me from being active. I had to go through physical therapy to ease me through the transition and in the mean time gained 30 pounds even though I stuck to a low calorie diet. Now I am actually able to move though I can still dislocate but I lost all the weight and now stand ad 115 lbs at 52.5. Still sometimes I get made fun of by people who dont know about my disorder because I swell a lot due to the partial dislocations and it can make me look chunky. I lost the weight for me. I was an active person prior to my diagnosis and didnt want to lose that part of me. I dont expect anyone with a disorder like mine or any disorder that causes them constant pain to be active like me... some days are absolute hell. People always make assumptions about other people, especially about weight, without ever knowing the reason that person is the way they are. sweatdrop

Yes certainly. My friends ankle and knee swell like hell when shes moved on them too much. Which causes them to hurt, which causes her not to want to move on them until the swelling goes down. Which is days sometimes, as I bet you know. I do know the doctors told her that she probably wont be able to run again. I dont exactly know why, it might be the metal plates and pins in her knee, I havent asked her. She was devastated to hear that and its a bit of a sensitive subject. She pretty much had to learn to walk again and she was very proud of herself when she was able to walk all by herself onto the stage at graduation. cat_crying
Anyway. Im almost 100 sure people think that my friend has trouble walking because of her weight or she has a handicapped sticker which she only uses when shes swelling since shes in a lot of pain) because of her weight. Hate those people. emotion_facepalm
People can be asses. Ive had them call the cops on me over my pass multiple times because I dont look disabled. I wouldnt be surprised if your friend is catching crap about it. I hope she is doing well
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Fantasy stories like those the Disney princess films are based on are so archetypal that having a fatter princess would probably just feel forced. I would welcome the idea, but I can't see it doing anything but backfire.
But to my knowledge, Disney isn't making any more princess movies because of the poor box office reception of The Princess and the Frog.


*ahemTangled* *coughBravecough cough*
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1 of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. Its a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasnt that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but youve already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
Ive already posted this story, but Ill write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she cant really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. Its been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now shes really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she cant lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
Im only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I cant even stand anymore. She cant. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I cant say its her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I cant say its her fault that she cant really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I dont know how common her experiences are, and Im not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and its painful to move them too much. Shes the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, shes also the fattest so Id use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasnt included in the above things you mentioned which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop


The first thing Id like to know is if she was overweight prior to the accident.

The above examples I gave were solely about disease. Accidents are entirely circumstantial. Your body can fix a bone naturally, not disease. However, even still, she struggles no more than you. I can easily tell you that shes already eating wrong if shes overweight. Its the same concept as working out and lifting weights. You dont grow more muscle fibers you can, but thats not the point), but the fibers merely grow in size, which requires more calories to use in order to maintain these larger muscle fibers. If you suddenly stop working out, these fibers shrink, leading to the common misconception that muscle turns into fat which is false). The reason people believe this is because they fail to accommodate their new calorie burn rate, which is lessoned due to a lack of need to sustain the muscles. Thus, such people are eating more than they should, as they are used to eating a certain way.
The same goes for your friend. You can remain entirely stationary all your life and remain of average body weight. Examples? There are plenty of people who are limited to chairs all their lives, and none of them that are notable right off of my head are remotely overweight. The only ones that are are simply being fed too much or are affected by medication which gains weight). Then again, she also might be taking medication that is aiding her weight gain. Look into it.

Lastly, she can exercise in a pool. A lot of elderly do this because of their sensitive joints. Something little is better than nothing at all.


Not really.
She has metal plates and pins where her breaks were, save for the one in her ankle. Is this the right circumstance for you? Because that doesnt sound too natural to me.
Forgive me if I thought you giving a list and saying The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems meant The ONLY people who cannot really lose weight, or at least ACTUALLY struggle to do so, are those with the ABOVE STATED PROBLEMS. cat_confused
Certainly. She may have been eating the same while she couldnt move. She could have been eating more, less. Im not sure. She also may have been taking that medication then. Its been 6 years, she isnt now. She takes OTC anti-inflamitories when she hurts. Thats it. None of my point is about how she gained the weight. Its her ability to lose the weight. I explained the situation when she gained the weight and the situation she is now which, you know, are hand in hand.) Thats why all of the questions I asked you after I explained this was about losing weight. Whatever means she gained weight, whether it was eating too much while not being able to move or medication, shes not in that situation anymore. She can move and shes not on medicine.
She could certainly exercise in a pool in the summer. And does. A lot. But theres snow outside and the nearest indoor pool is a 45 minute drive or a two hour bus ride away. Thats not easy, thats hardly anything near convenient, its time and money consuming to even get to a place where she can exercise a little bit.
Again, is she a failure for not being able to lose weight? Could you say that she actually struggles to lose weight? Do you think she can actually lose a significant amount of weight in her situation even just getting to a point where she is not considered obese anymore, even if shes still overweight?) Barring any gastrointestinal surgeries, anyone can lose weight that way.) Again, Im talking about her weight loss not gain.


Despite what people think, how someone obtained the weight is very much an important part of this. You cannot sympathize with someone nearly on the same level for their joint and back pains from weight gain simply because of poor life decisions over someone who is in the same position, but due to a disease that is near uncontrollable.

So it was pretty much a half baked list. Of course there are always special cases and circumstances that are relevant. However, a very important difference would be that if someone is in pain, it does not inhibit them from working out to a certain degree. Even those who are bed ridden are capable of burning the same calories as they take in, so excuses are rather limited. My brother, for instance, has four metal rods and a few metal plates in his body. He was snowboarding and had a terrible introduction with a few boulders and trees. He gained a little weight afterwards due to his inability to really move, though he never got anything near overweight. So, instead of being the ripped muscle guy he was, he had a little fat which was merely covering up his musles) on his body than what he was used to. He was still of a healthy weight despite all of this.
To be perfectly honest, its just as I said. There really are very few excuses for gaining weight, which tend to be the same reasons it is difficult to lose weight. Medicine was an example. Beyond that, youre still in control.
Your case is obviously different, as you have a disease. She does not. She has injuries, just as many before and after her have, yet they were capable of maintaining their weight for the most part. Fifteen pound gain is almost to be expected, but beyond this is just lacking control. Now, for those people who gain weight from injuries, they could probably be a little more educated in changing their eating habits so they dont find themselves 50lbs heavier than a month ago.

So, to sum that all up, how one gains weight has everything to do with losing weight. If you dont gain weight, there is none to be lost. If you find the reason, you can stop and reverse it.
you must not know anyone who suffers from chronic pains. Mine is caused by a disorder, but I sympathize with anyone who has to deal with chronic joint pain. Even when I dont dislocate the pain can be so intense I puke or pass out. When Im not dizzy from pain I sometimes think what if they just chopped it off?. Joint pains are horrible... Its not concentrated like it sounds. Joint pains start sharp at the origin and spread to other joints which hurt just as badly. It gets to the point where you dont know where the pain started. The pains can be more intense than labor and if medication doesnt ease it it can last for days on end. Nothing is in your mind but complete and total agony. So can I sympathize with someone who suffers with joint pain, hell yes I can.
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal
Ms Ragnarok
Vizal


Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1 of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. Its a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasnt that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but youve already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
Ive already posted this story, but Ill write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she cant really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. Its been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now shes really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she cant lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
Im only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I cant even stand anymore. She cant. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I cant say its her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I cant say its her fault that she cant really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I dont know how common her experiences are, and Im not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and its painful to move them too much. Shes the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, shes also the fattest so Id use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasnt included in the above things you mentioned which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop


The first thing Id like to know is if she was overweight prior to the accident.

The above examples I gave were solely about disease. Accidents are entirely circumstantial. Your body can fix a bone naturally, not disease. However, even still, she struggles no more than you. I can easily tell you that shes already eating wrong if shes overweight. Its the same concept as working out and lifting weights. You dont grow more muscle fibers you can, but thats not the point), but the fibers merely grow in size, which requires more calories to use in order to maintain these larger muscle fibers. If you suddenly stop working out, these fibers shrink, leading to the common misconception that muscle turns into fat which is false). The reason people believe this is because they fail to accommodate their new calorie burn rate, which is lessoned due to a lack of need to sustain the muscles. Thus, such people are eating more than they should, as they are used to eating a certain way.
The same goes for your friend. You can remain entirely stationary all your life and remain of average body weight. Examples? There are plenty of people who are limited to chairs all their lives, and none of them that are notable right off of my head are remotely overweight. The only ones that are are simply being fed too much or are affected by medication which gains weight). Then again, she also might be taking medication that is aiding her weight gain. Look into it.

Lastly, she can exercise in a pool. A lot of elderly do this because of their sensitive joints. Something little is better than nothing at all.


Not really.
She has metal plates and pins where her breaks were, save for the one in her ankle. Is this the right circumstance for you? Because that doesnt sound too natural to me.
Forgive me if I thought you giving a list and saying The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems meant The ONLY people who cannot really lose weight, or at least ACTUALLY struggle to do so, are those with the ABOVE STATED PROBLEMS. cat_confused
Certainly. She may have been eating the same while she couldnt move. She could have been eating more, less. Im not sure. She also may have been taking that medication then. Its been 6 years, she isnt now. She takes OTC anti-inflamitories when she hurts. Thats it. None of my point is about how she gained the weight. Its her ability to lose the weight. I explained the situation when she gained the weight and the situation she is now which, you know, are hand in hand.) Thats why all of the questions I asked you after I explained this was about losing weight. Whatever means she gained weight, whether it was eating too much while not being able to move or medication, shes not in that situation anymore. She can move and shes not on medicine.
She could certainly exercise in a pool in the summer. And does. A lot. But theres snow outside and the nearest indoor pool is a 45 minute drive or a two hour bus ride away. Thats not easy, thats hardly anything near convenient, its time and money consuming to even get to a place where she can exercise a little bit.
Again, is she a failure for not being able to lose weight? Could you say that she actually struggles to lose weight? Do you think she can actually lose a significant amount of weight in her situation even just getting to a point where she is not considered obese anymore, even if shes still overweight?) Barring any gastrointestinal surgeries, anyone can lose weight that way.) Again, Im talking about her weight loss not gain.


Despite what people think, how someone obtained the weight is very much an important part of this. You cannot sympathize with someone nearly on the same level for their joint and back pains from weight gain simply because of poor life decisions over someone who is in the same position, but due to a disease that is near uncontrollable.

So it was pretty much a half baked list. Of course there are always special cases and circumstances that are relevant. However, a very important difference would be that if someone is in pain, it does not inhibit them from working out to a certain degree. Even those who are bed ridden are capable of burning the same calories as they take in, so excuses are rather limited. My brother, for instance, has four metal rods and a few metal plates in his body. He was snowboarding and had a terrible introduction with a few boulders and trees. He gained a little weight afterwards due to his inability to really move, though he never got anything near overweight. So, instead of being the ripped muscle guy he was, he had a little fat which was merely covering up his musles) on his body than what he was used to. He was still of a healthy weight despite all of this.
To be perfectly honest, its just as I said. There really are very few excuses for gaining weight, which tend to be the same reasons it is difficult to lose weight. Medicine was an example. Beyond that, youre still in control.
Your case is obviously different, as you have a disease. She does not. She has injuries, just as many before and after her have, yet they were capable of maintaining their weight for the most part. Fifteen pound gain is almost to be expected, but beyond this is just lacking control. Now, for those people who gain weight from injuries, they could probably be a little more educated in changing their eating habits so they dont find themselves 50lbs heavier than a month ago.

So, to sum that all up, how one gains weight has everything to do with losing weight. If you dont gain weight, there is none to be lost. If you find the reason, you can stop and reverse it.
you must not know anyone who suffers from chronic pains. Mine is caused by a disorder, but I sympathize with anyone who has to deal with chronic joint pain. Even when I dont dislocate the pain can be so intense I puke or pass out. When Im not dizzy from pain I sometimes think what if they just chopped it off?. Joint pains are horrible... Its not concentrated like it sounds. Joint pains start sharp at the origin and spread to other joints which hurt just as badly. It gets to the point where you dont know where the pain started. The pains can be more intense than labor and if medication doesnt ease it it can last for days on end. Nothing is in your mind but complete and total agony. So can I sympathize with someone who suffers with joint pain, hell yes I can.
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Rad Hominem
Fantasy stories like those the Disney princess films are based on are so archetypal that having a fatter princess would probably just feel forced. I would welcome the idea, but I can't see it doing anything but backfire.
But to my knowledge, Disney isn't making any more princess movies because of the poor box office reception of The Princess and the Frog.


*ahemTangled* *coughBravecough cough*

Brave is being made by Pixar... which is pretty much the new Disney now... so carry on.
Sergeant Pancakebatter
Vizal
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Ms Ragnarok
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Thank you for caching that mistake. I appreciate it. :1
The point is still made, even. 1 in 500 proves less than 1 of the people have a disease that correlates with weight gain. On top of this, it is always incredibly imparitive when reading percentages such as these that one does not assume all individuals with the disease are at all overweight. Many with the disease itself are not overweight, which only lowers the percentage even further. Its a sub-percent of a percent, really.

I thought the point wasnt that these people were necessarily overweight, but that weight loss had different degrees of difficulty? Maybe I am misreading something?
I did write out a big paragraph about my experiences as someone with hypothyroidism, but youve already stated that you agree that the people you listed above have difficulties losing weight. I suppose I read over that the first time...!)
Ive already posted this story, but Ill write it out again to see what you think about it. I have a friend and to be honest she is really fat. Now when she was 15 she got in a car accident that broke her back, one of her legs and her other ankle. So after this she could hardly move on her own for 6 months and after that she still needed a lot of assistance from her sister, a wheel chair, crutches. Even now, 6 years after the fact, she cant really walk long distances and often it hurts her back or her leg or her ankle to walk on it at all. So for over a year she was very very stationary, and there were many days when she only moved to go to the bathroom,if she could manage that alone. So reasonably, she had very little exercise, but to stay healthy, she still had to eat a lot more than she was burning. Its been 6 years and, like I said, she still struggles to be able to walk without being in pain, anything that moves the back too much causes her a lot of pain and now shes really fat.
Would you say my friend is a failure because she cant lose weight? Do I have a more legitimate struggle than her in losing weight because I have hypothyroidism and she has none of the things you listed above? Would you say she can really lose significant weight? Could you say she actually struggles to lose weight?
Im only asking because I personally consider her less able to lose weight than me. I can run and jog and take extensive walks without my back, legs or ankles becoming so pained I cant even stand anymore. She cant. She gained weight because of a very sedentary life for over a year. But I cant say its her fault that she was sedentary for so long and I cant say its her fault that she cant really exercise a lot now to lose the weight from that.
I dont know how common her experiences are, and Im not sure if we can actually find any sources to how many people have experienced something similar. I know three people including her) that have similar problems in which their knees/backs were broken and its painful to move them too much. Shes the most severe out of all the people I know, obviously, shes also the fattest so Id use her as an example. Anyway, my point is, I feel my friend is unable, or at least has a very, very difficult time losing weight because of how much pain she experiences when walks places she needs to nonetheless for exercise. This wasnt included in the above things you mentioned which you said were the only situations you feel struggling to lose weight was legitimate) so I guess I wanted to know your thoughts on that even if her experiences are an exception, not the rule. cat_sweatdrop


The first thing Id like to know is if she was overweight prior to the accident.

The above examples I gave were solely about disease. Accidents are entirely circumstantial. Your body can fix a bone naturally, not disease. However, even still, she struggles no more than you. I can easily tell you that shes already eating wrong if shes overweight. Its the same concept as working out and lifting weights. You dont grow more muscle fibers you can, but thats not the point), but the fibers merely grow in size, which requires more calories to use in order to maintain these larger muscle fibers. If you suddenly stop working out, these fibers shrink, leading to the common misconception that muscle turns into fat which is false). The reason people believe this is because they fail to accommodate their new calorie burn rate, which is lessoned due to a lack of need to sustain the muscles. Thus, such people are eating more than they should, as they are used to eating a certain way.
The same goes for your friend. You can remain entirely stationary all your life and remain of average body weight. Examples? There are plenty of people who are limited to chairs all their lives, and none of them that are notable right off of my head are remotely overweight. The only ones that are are simply being fed too much or are affected by medication which gains weight). Then again, she also might be taking medication that is aiding her weight gain. Look into it.

Lastly, she can exercise in a pool. A lot of elderly do this because of their sensitive joints. Something little is better than nothing at all.


Not really.
She has metal plates and pins where her breaks were, save for the one in her ankle. Is this the right circumstance for you? Because that doesnt sound too natural to me.
Forgive me if I thought you giving a list and saying The only people who cannot really lose weight, or at least actually struggle to do so, are those with the above stated problems meant The ONLY people who cannot really lose weight, or at least ACTUALLY struggle to do so, are those with the ABOVE STATED PROBLEMS. cat_confused
Certainly. She may have been eating the same while she couldnt move. She could have been eating more, less. Im not sure. She also may have been taking that medication then. Its been 6 years, she isnt now. She takes OTC anti-inflamitories when she hurts. Thats it. None of my point is about how she gained the weight. Its her ability to lose the weight. I explained the situation when she gained the weight and the situation she is now which, you know, are hand in hand.) Thats why all of the questions I asked you after I explained this was about losing weight. Whatever means she gained weight, whether it was eating too much while not being able to move or medication, shes not in that situation anymore. She can move and shes not on medicine.
She could certainly exercise in a pool in the summer. And does. A lot. But theres snow outside and the nearest indoor pool is a 45 minute drive or a two hour bus ride away. Thats not easy, thats hardly anything near convenient, its time and money consuming to even get to a place where she can exercise a little bit.
Again, is she a failure for not being able to lose weight? Could you say that she actually struggles to lose weight? Do you think she can actually lose a significant amount of weight in her situation even just getting to a point where she is not considered obese anymore, even if shes still overweight?) Barring any gastrointestinal surgeries, anyone can lose weight that way.) Again, Im talking about her weight loss not gain.


Despite what people think, how someone obtained the weight is very much an important part of this. You cannot sympathize with someone nearly on the same level for their joint and back pains from weight gain simply because of poor life decisions over someone who is in the same position, but due to a disease that is near uncontrollable.

So it was pretty much a half baked list. Of course there are always special cases and circumstances that are relevant. However, a very important difference would be that if someone is in pain, it does not inhibit them from working out to a certain degree. Even those who are bed ridden are capable of burning the same calories as they take in, so excuses are rather limited. My brother, for instance, has four metal rods and a few metal plates in his body. He was snowboarding and had a terrible introduction with a few boulders and trees. He gained a little weight afterwards due to his inability to really move, though he never got anything near overweight. So, instead of being the ripped muscle guy he was, he had a little fat which was merely covering up his musles) on his body than what he was used to. He was still of a healthy weight despite all of this.
To be perfectly honest, its just as I said. There really are very few excuses for gaining weight, which tend to be the same reasons it is difficult to lose weight. Medicine was an example. Beyond that, youre still in control.
Your case is obviously different, as you have a disease. She does not. She has injuries, just as many before and after her have, yet they were capable of maintaining their weight for the most part. Fifteen pound gain is almost to be expected, but beyond this is just lacking control. Now, for those people who gain weight from injuries, they could probably be a little more educated in changing their eating habits so they dont find themselves 50lbs heavier than a month ago.

So, to sum that all up, how one gains weight has everything to do with losing weight. If you dont gain weight, there is none to be lost. If you find the reason, you can stop and reverse it.


you must not know anyone who suffers from chronic pains. Mine is caused by a disorder, but I sympathize with anyone who has to deal with chronic joint pain. Even when I dont dislocate the pain can be so intense I puke or pass out. When Im not dizzy from pain I sometimes think what if they just chopped it off?. Joint pains are horrible... Its not concentrated like it sounds. Joint pains start sharp at the origin and spread to other joints which hurt just as badly. It gets to the point where you dont know where the pain started. The pains can be more intense than labor and if medication doesnt ease it it can last for days on end. Nothing is in your mind but complete and total agony. So can I sympathize with someone who suffers with joint pain, hell yes I can.


That's quite an assumption.
Yes, I do suffer from joint pains. In fact, so does my brother, father, grandfather, etc. I also have some paralyzed friends. I'm not exactly speaking out of ignorance here. The thing we have in common? None of us are overweight. We'd rather not be distracted by that which inhibits us. It's not worth it.
Rad Hominem
Fantasy stories like those the Disney princess films are based on are so archetypal that having a fatter princess would probably just feel forced. I would welcome the idea, but I can't see it doing anything but backfire.
But to my knowledge, Disney isn't making any more princess movies because of the poor box office reception of The Princess and the Frog.

Disney had previously stated that it wouldn't make any more hand animated films even before they started princess and the frog. This clearly shows just how much of a token movie that is.
That aside, it would be forced. Frankly, gluttony is simply unappealing, and main characters who are handicapped don't make the biggest box office hits.

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