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black_wing_angel's avatar

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Technically, judging someone for their tattoos IS judging them for their actions.

But regardless, I believe it all comes down to what and where. A small tattoo that can be easily concealed, if necessary? No harm in it. Having your entire body covered in ink? That's not quite so reasonable. And having a tattoo of your national flag, or a heart or butterfly or whatever? Sure. Why not? But too many of the tattoos people get, are ill-conceived "spur of the moment" decisions, that they'll inevitably regret, once time goes by. All you really have to do, is google search "tattoo fail", and you'll see the kind of s**t I'm talking about. Someone with some of THOSE tattoos? I wouldn't trust with such a high responsibility. They've already shown a distinct lack of forethought.
HMS Thunder Child's avatar

Magical Girl

black_wing_angel
Technically, judging someone for their tattoos IS judging them for their actions.

But regardless, I believe it all comes down to what and where. A small tattoo that can be easily concealed, if necessary? No harm in it. Having your entire body covered in ink? That's not quite so reasonable. And having a tattoo of your national flag, or a heart or butterfly or whatever? Sure. Why not? But too many of the tattoos people get, are ill-conceived "spur of the moment" decisions, that they'll inevitably regret, once time goes by. All you really have to do, is google search "tattoo fail", and you'll see the kind of s**t I'm talking about. Someone with some of THOSE tattoos? I wouldn't trust with such a high responsibility. They've already shown a distinct lack of forethought.
[Skeptical]

Curious as to how you're an expert on tattoos despite an aversion to them. Or how you can judge people considering your haircut.

What's wrong with someone spending money getting their entire body inked? Personally, I find it beats biannual phone purchases and so on. Tattoos, being a personal expenditure, though, beat conspicuous consumption any day, so maybe that's not a fair comparison.
black_wing_angel's avatar

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black_wing_angel
Technically, judging someone for their tattoos IS judging them for their actions.

But regardless, I believe it all comes down to what and where. A small tattoo that can be easily concealed, if necessary? No harm in it. Having your entire body covered in ink? That's not quite so reasonable. And having a tattoo of your national flag, or a heart or butterfly or whatever? Sure. Why not? But too many of the tattoos people get, are ill-conceived "spur of the moment" decisions, that they'll inevitably regret, once time goes by. All you really have to do, is google search "tattoo fail", and you'll see the kind of s**t I'm talking about. Someone with some of THOSE tattoos? I wouldn't trust with such a high responsibility. They've already shown a distinct lack of forethought.
[Skeptical]

Curious as to how you're an expert on tattoos despite an aversion to them. Or how you can judge people considering your haircut.


I hang out at a tattoo shop my best friend works at, regularly. I do not have any ink of my own, and have absolutely no desire to (considered it a few times, but decided I couldn't commit to the permanency, compared to the uncertainty of the future). Regardless, I've seen absolutely no shortage of it. Hell, my buddy himself has at least 20. I've seen tattoos being done that I know in my heart are going to be cherished forever, and I've seen tattoos done that I guaran-goddamn-tee will be covered, inside of 3 years from now.

And I don't recall saying I have a problem with them. I don't, in general. I have an aversion to potential content, that may prove to be regretful, in the future. ESPECIALLY those who tattoo lovers' names or faces onto their bodies. Yeah, it's really sweet, and all. But permanent. Your relationship very well might not be. Lawyers advise prenups, for a reason.

As for my hair? I can cut it, anytime I feel it's a hinderance to my goals. Not so easy to get rid of ink. Also, I have long, well managed hair. That's a HELL of a lot different than having a pentagram on my forehead, or naked woman on my forearm.

Quote:
What's wrong with someone spending money getting their entire body inked?


In and of itself? Nothing. But it's generally a lot less likely for people to take you seriously. Not speaking of myself, but of the general society. And it has a lot more to do with the content of the tattoo, than simply the placement. You're going to feel awfully foolish someday, when you carry "Chevrolet Forever!" on your back, pressed against the upholstry in a Toyota.

Quote:
Personally, I find it beats biannual phone purchases and so on.


I don't really see how. A phone can benefit you greatly, in a time of desperation. Car breaks down? Call a friend or tow truck. Accidentally slice your thumb down to the bone? 911. A tattoo has absolutely no benefits, except aesthetic.

I have aboslutely no idea how you can compare the 2.

Quote:
Tattoos, being a personal expenditure, though, beat conspicuous consumption any day, so maybe that's not a fair comparison.


It's not. But not for that reason.
HMS Thunder Child's avatar

Magical Girl

black_wing_angel
HMS Thunder Child
black_wing_angel
Technically, judging someone for their tattoos IS judging them for their actions.

But regardless, I believe it all comes down to what and where. A small tattoo that can be easily concealed, if necessary? No harm in it. Having your entire body covered in ink? That's not quite so reasonable. And having a tattoo of your national flag, or a heart or butterfly or whatever? Sure. Why not? But too many of the tattoos people get, are ill-conceived "spur of the moment" decisions, that they'll inevitably regret, once time goes by. All you really have to do, is google search "tattoo fail", and you'll see the kind of s**t I'm talking about. Someone with some of THOSE tattoos? I wouldn't trust with such a high responsibility. They've already shown a distinct lack of forethought.
[Skeptical]

Curious as to how you're an expert on tattoos despite an aversion to them. Or how you can judge people considering your haircut.


I hang out at a tattoo shop my best friend works at, regularly. I do not have any ink of my own, and have absolutely no desire to (considered it a few times, but decided I couldn't commit to the permanency, compared to the uncertainty of the future). Regardless, I've seen absolutely no shortage of it. Hell, my buddy himself has at least 20. I've seen tattoos being done that I know in my heart are going to be cherished forever, and I've seen tattoos done that I guaran-goddamn-tee will be covered, inside of 3 years from now.

And I don't recall saying I have a problem with them. I don't, in general. I have an aversion to potential content, that may prove to be regretful, in the future. ESPECIALLY those who tattoo lovers' names or faces onto their bodies. Yeah, it's really sweet, and all. But permanent. Your relationship very well might not be. Lawyers advise prenups, for a reason.

Quote:
What's wrong with someone spending money getting their entire body inked?


In and of itself? Nothing. But it's generally a lot less likely for people to take you seriously. Not speaking of myself, but of the general society. And it has a lot more to do with the content of the tattoo, than simply the placement. You're going to feel awfully foolish someday, when you carry "Chevrolet Forever!" on your back, pressed against the upholstry in a Toyota.

Quote:
Personally, I find it beats biannual phone purchases and so on.


I don't really see how. A phone can benefit you greatly, in a time of desperation. Car breaks down? Call a friend or tow truck. Accidentally slice your thumb down to the bone? 911. A tattoo has absolutely no benefits, except aesthetic.

I have aboslutely no idea how you can compare the 2.

Quote:
Tattoos, being a personal expenditure, though, beat conspicuous consumption any day, so maybe that's not a fair comparison.


It's not. But not for that reason.
[Skeptical]

I recall you saying something to the effect of you not dating someone for having too many tattoos. Also, I don't really see anything wrong with name tattoos, though I know others do and I take no issue with that. I enjoy the notion of permanence. It's human nature to forget some of our more tragic failings. Psychologically healthy or whatever. Balls to that, I say. Never forget, get it perma-inked onto your bod.

See above.

Biannual. As in people buy a new phone more often than I buy clothes. Granted, I'm poor/cheap, but still. My phone is almost six years old. Dinged and scratched to all hell, but it still works. And it doesn't need apps or anything like that, either. The alarm clock is handy, though, I will admit.

Might ought to explain yourself here. Tattoos are a personal thing. Conspicuous consumption is all about bragging about material wealth and status through purchase and presentation of things. One's whatever, the other's the bane of existence and is one of the things rotting in the guts of the West. West tries to mouthwash, cleanse the stink out, but the stink's in its guts.
black_wing_angel's avatar

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black_wing_angel
HMS Thunder Child
black_wing_angel
Technically, judging someone for their tattoos IS judging them for their actions.

But regardless, I believe it all comes down to what and where. A small tattoo that can be easily concealed, if necessary? No harm in it. Having your entire body covered in ink? That's not quite so reasonable. And having a tattoo of your national flag, or a heart or butterfly or whatever? Sure. Why not? But too many of the tattoos people get, are ill-conceived "spur of the moment" decisions, that they'll inevitably regret, once time goes by. All you really have to do, is google search "tattoo fail", and you'll see the kind of s**t I'm talking about. Someone with some of THOSE tattoos? I wouldn't trust with such a high responsibility. They've already shown a distinct lack of forethought.
[Skeptical]

Curious as to how you're an expert on tattoos despite an aversion to them. Or how you can judge people considering your haircut.


I hang out at a tattoo shop my best friend works at, regularly. I do not have any ink of my own, and have absolutely no desire to (considered it a few times, but decided I couldn't commit to the permanency, compared to the uncertainty of the future). Regardless, I've seen absolutely no shortage of it. Hell, my buddy himself has at least 20. I've seen tattoos being done that I know in my heart are going to be cherished forever, and I've seen tattoos done that I guaran-goddamn-tee will be covered, inside of 3 years from now.

And I don't recall saying I have a problem with them. I don't, in general. I have an aversion to potential content, that may prove to be regretful, in the future. ESPECIALLY those who tattoo lovers' names or faces onto their bodies. Yeah, it's really sweet, and all. But permanent. Your relationship very well might not be. Lawyers advise prenups, for a reason.

Quote:
What's wrong with someone spending money getting their entire body inked?


In and of itself? Nothing. But it's generally a lot less likely for people to take you seriously. Not speaking of myself, but of the general society. And it has a lot more to do with the content of the tattoo, than simply the placement. You're going to feel awfully foolish someday, when you carry "Chevrolet Forever!" on your back, pressed against the upholstry in a Toyota.

Quote:
Personally, I find it beats biannual phone purchases and so on.


I don't really see how. A phone can benefit you greatly, in a time of desperation. Car breaks down? Call a friend or tow truck. Accidentally slice your thumb down to the bone? 911. A tattoo has absolutely no benefits, except aesthetic.

I have aboslutely no idea how you can compare the 2.

Quote:
Tattoos, being a personal expenditure, though, beat conspicuous consumption any day, so maybe that's not a fair comparison.


It's not. But not for that reason.
[Skeptical]

I recall you saying something to the effect of you not dating someone for having too many tattoos.


Oh, that. Yeah, I think having too many, or just the wrong tattoos really takes away from one's natural beauty. The same with piercings. 1 or 2 in strategic places can be quite pretty. But when your entire face looks like a metal shop floor, it just takes away.

Quote:
Also, I don't really see anything wrong with name tattoos, though I know others do and I take no issue with that.


Depends on who's name. Your child? Perfect. That's a permanent bond. Zero risk. But your boyfriend you've been dating for 3 weeks? No.

Quote:
I enjoy the notion of permanence. It's human nature to forget some of our more tragic failings. Psychologically healthy or whatever. Balls to that, I say. Never forget, get it perma-inked onto your bod.

See above.

Biannual. As in people buy a new phone more often than I buy clothes. Granted, I'm poor/cheap, but still. My phone is almost six years old. Dinged and scratched to all hell, but it still works. And it doesn't need apps or anything like that, either. The alarm clock is handy, though, I will admit.


Yeah, I've consistently avoided smart-phones thus far. And plan to continue to. They offer very little practical tools, that aren't present on my current phone. Although I do update bi-annually, just because by then, the current one's been through enough hell, and it's time to retire it.

Quote:
Might ought to explain yourself here. Tattoos are a personal thing. Conspicuous consumption is all about bragging about material wealth and status through purchase and presentation of things. One's whatever, the other's the bane of existence and is one of the things rotting in the guts of the West. West tries to mouthwash, cleanse the stink out, but the stink's in its guts.


I have no idea what you're talking about, here...
I AM R U's avatar

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duldol v3
I AM R U
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I AM R U
Perhaps it isn't so much that he has tattoos, but the nature/position of them. I have no issue with tattoos, but getting a tattoo in certain places can lead to generalised ideas about one's character. For example, getting a tattoo on your lower back is described as a "tramp stamp", and is seen as something on slutty, lower class girls would get. I'm not saying this is right, just about the ideas associated with the image.


I agree. So therefore do we just need to associate positive images with tattoos?


Well, I think that is happening naturally as tattoos move into the mainstream - they become more acceptable as more "acceptable" people get them.


Hopefully!

I'm still trying to understand this professionalism attire and why tattoos are sometimes banned from being shown in the workplace.


I suppose it's considered unprofessional... I personally don't fully agree with that stance, but as society stands today, it is considered less than inspiring when a surgeon has tattoos. Just for example.
Agent Borealis
Mei tsuki7

That is called anecdotal evidence and has no true scientific basis and is not true evidence. It is prejudice honestly but that doesn't mean it's not a normal human response.

I actually don't know anyone with a tattoo who is a troublemaker honestly.


No it is pattern recognition.

Lets say you go into town for the first time and you meet 20 people, 6 of the people that you come across have tattoos and they all attempt to rob you. A short while later you come across person number 21 and this person has tattoos as well. Do you suspect that they might try to rob you? Based on your past experiences? I know that I would consider it and it is because of the pattern that my brain is noticing.


Again, it's anecdotal evidence and is not true scientific evidence. You cannot subscribe a small pattern to the group as a whole. Statistically it does not work.
duldol v3
I AM R U
duldol v3
I AM R U
Perhaps it isn't so much that he has tattoos, but the nature/position of them. I have no issue with tattoos, but getting a tattoo in certain places can lead to generalised ideas about one's character. For example, getting a tattoo on your lower back is described as a "tramp stamp", and is seen as something on slutty, lower class girls would get. I'm not saying this is right, just about the ideas associated with the image.


I agree. So therefore do we just need to associate positive images with tattoos?


Well, I think that is happening naturally as tattoos move into the mainstream - they become more acceptable as more "acceptable" people get them.


Hopefully!

I'm still trying to understand this professionalism attire and why tattoos are sometimes banned from being shown in the workplace.


I've never understood it either but it's just another subjective, societal belief I guess.
duldol v3's avatar

Newbie Noob

All I see really are people having a problem with a man's free will.
Spyke180's avatar

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You can have full sleeves in the US Navy.
duldol v3's avatar

Newbie Noob

shinigami ryukie
Well I personally like tattoos, I'm planning a getting a few. However is Joe McQuick who had a bazillion tattoos ran for president, vs SpicnSpiffy Jr, I'd probably vote for the 2nd in a pinch decision.

It all has to do with the public's perception of people with tattoos.


Well, I wouldn't judge someone based on how they look, but what they can do.
I know looks come into play but you wouldn't care if your doctor was tattooed from head to toe if he's the number one surgeon with the best success rate of removing a tumor in your body.

Currently the Vladimir Franz (tattooed president) is third in the race http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/europe/czech-republic/130110/vladimir-franz-tattooed-professor-czech-elections (this was three days ago)

Czech people are so tired of their candidates corruption that they actually are quite receptive to him. Vladimir graduated from one of the top law schools in Prague, and he didn't want to practice law so he became a professor.

His students all wanted him to run for candidate as a shock thing.
He didn't want to let them down since he had a large supporting, and now he's actually quite in the race.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2259580/Vladimir-Franz-Totally-tattooed-professor-THIRD-race-Czech-president.html

So it's funny. Czechs are saying they wouldn't vote for him, not because of how he looks, but because he lacks political experience.
duldol v3's avatar

Newbie Noob

Spyke180
You can have full sleeves in the US Navy.


What's your point? Mind elaborating please
Spyke180's avatar

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duldol v3
Spyke180
You can have full sleeves in the US Navy.


What's your point? Mind elaborating please


Its one of the few careers thats rather accepting of tattoos.
Im seeing alot of people with tattoos and piercings at McDonalds.
But as far as careers with good upward mobility, I don't imagine many being very accepting of larger tattoos. Maybe its getting better though
Mei tsuki7

Again, it's anecdotal evidence and is not true scientific evidence. You cannot subscribe a small pattern to the group as a whole. Statistically it does not work.


You wouldn't be subscribing the pattern to the group as a whole. In my example you would be 'subscribing' it to the group in your area (the city). I never claimed that it was true scientific evidence, I said that it was pattern recognition and it is. Organisms learn to see these patterns as a survival tactic.
duldol v3
All I see really are people having a problem with a man's free will.


It's no more constricting of a man's free will, than not letting him walk around in nothing but stuffed crotch spandex trunks.

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