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Chicago determining not to reply to more 911 calls.

The key point of it?

Quote:
McCarthy said Chicago police respond to 70 percent of 911 calls, compared to 30 to 50 percent in other cities.



So, as the courts have already stated, law enforcement doesn't have a legal obligation to protect you.
This just solidifies it. In other areas they claim 50% or less 911 response to the scene? And they wonder why some of us choose to own.
They decided not to respond (send a trooper) to those situations where the victim is not in immediate danger. Unless you work under the paradigm that your property is you, that is consistent with protection of your life and person.
Sarah Louise Kerrigan
They decided not to respond (send a trooper) to those situations where the victim is not in immediate danger. Unless you work under the paradigm that your property is you, that is consistent with protection of your life and person.


He makes the claim that they respond to 70% of their calls. Other cities don't even hit 50%, some even 30%. Are you claiming that over 30% of all crimes don't call 911 until after the crime has been committed?
Old Blue Collar Joe
Sarah Louise Kerrigan
They decided not to respond (send a trooper) to those situations where the victim is not in immediate danger. Unless you work under the paradigm that your property is you, that is consistent with protection of your life and person.


He makes the claim that they respond to 70% of their calls. Other cities don't even hit 50%, some even 30%. Are you claiming that over 30% of all crimes don't call 911 until after the crime has been committed?

Edit: The 30% is crime with no immediate threat to your life.
Old Blue Collar Joe
Chicago determining not to reply to more 911 calls.

The key point of it?

Quote:
McCarthy said Chicago police respond to 70 percent of 911 calls, compared to 30 to 50 percent in other cities.



So, as the courts have already stated, law enforcement doesn't have a legal obligation to protect you.
This just solidifies it. In other areas they claim 50% or less 911 response to the scene? And they wonder why some of us choose to own.
The Source
They’ll no longer come right away to reports of things like criminal damage to property, vehicle thefts, garage burglaries, or other crimes in which the suspect is no longer on the scene, and the victim isn’t in immediate danger.
Selective reading is fun!
Of course I trust 911. German engineering is reliable and superior to American engineering...
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Old Blue Collar Joe
Sarah Louise Kerrigan
They decided not to respond (send a trooper) to those situations where the victim is not in immediate danger. Unless you work under the paradigm that your property is you, that is consistent with protection of your life and person.


He makes the claim that they respond to 70% of their calls. Other cities don't even hit 50%, some even 30%. Are you claiming that over 30% of all crimes don't call 911 until after the crime has been committed?


Many legitimate 911 calls are not an emergency / life threatening / needs an immediate response kind of call. I'm pretty sure if you just looked at calls like, "My dad stopped breathing" or "There is an intruder in my house" the rate of response would be MUCH higher. However calls like "I woke up this morning to see someone smashed my mailbox (or Halloween pumpkin) last night" or "my neighbor's dog barks too much during the day when they are at work" do not require an immediate roll out. Possibly also included in these stats (I don't know) are duplicate calls for the same issue.

And then of course there are the obvious crank calls and accidental calls. Don't ask me how but once I managed to call 911 when I was half asleep and bumped the phone. I can't remember the details now other than it was an accident. It was while I was managing apartments (and thus called 911 more often) so possibly they were the last outgoing call I made and I bumped redial). I didn't even realize the call had gone through but then they called me back. After talking to me a bit they determined it was a mistake and didn't send a car out. For one thing, I think they could check my previous calls that backed up I was the manager. My point being it was a 911 call in terms of total number of calls they received but no one responded on scene because there was obviously no need.

I used to think 911 was only for life threatening emergency type stuff. I've been surprised at a few of the things cops have told me just to call 911 for. And sorry, my brain isn't coming up with any solid examples at the moment. I just remember at the time questioning the officer and thinking, 'Really? That is something I should route through 911?" I think it had to do with something that was not an emergency but that was a way to get an incident number assigned to it.

Sort of related - I did a Google and realized a number of places have real time maps you can pull up of where 911 calls are being responded to. The one I brought up was for Seattle fire and medic. Not sure if there is much like that for criminal stuff. I still thought it was interesting though.

Mind you, I just see 911 as another tool in the toolbox. It doesn't replace what I might do on my own for self protection. In my case I believe if I had an intruder and called 911 they would come but due to distance are not likely to arrive in a timely manner.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

I trust the police to handle the situation in a given time frame, but immediately, no, not at all.

Even assuming they got to my place in 2 minutes if there's a guy with a gun I mean, it's only a few seconds that's needed to get me, I mean right? O_o
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David2074
Old Blue Collar Joe
Sarah Louise Kerrigan
They decided not to respond (send a trooper) to those situations where the victim is not in immediate danger. Unless you work under the paradigm that your property is you, that is consistent with protection of your life and person.


He makes the claim that they respond to 70% of their calls. Other cities don't even hit 50%, some even 30%. Are you claiming that over 30% of all crimes don't call 911 until after the crime has been committed?


Many legitimate 911 calls are not an emergency / life threatening / needs an immediate response kind of call. I'm pretty sure if you just looked at calls like, "My dad stopped breathing" or "There is an intruder in my house" the rate of response would be MUCH higher. However calls like "I woke up this morning to see someone smashed my mailbox (or Halloween pumpkin) last night" or "my neighbor's dog barks too much during the day when they are at work" do not require an immediate roll out. Possibly also included in these stats (I don't know) are duplicate calls for the same issue.

And then of course there are the obvious crank calls and accidental calls. Don't ask me how but once I managed to call 911 when I was half asleep and bumped the phone. I can't remember the details now other than it was an accident. It was while I was managing apartments (and thus called 911 more often) so possibly they were the last outgoing call I made and I bumped redial). I didn't even realize the call had gone through but then they called me back. After talking to me a bit they determined it was a mistake and didn't send a car out. For one thing, I think they could check my previous calls that backed up I was the manager. My point being it was a 911 call in terms of total number of calls they received but no one responded on scene because there was obviously no need.

I used to think 911 was only for life threatening emergency type stuff. I've been surprised at a few of the things cops have told me just to call 911 for. And sorry, my brain isn't coming up with any solid examples at the moment. I just remember at the time questioning the officer and thinking, 'Really? That is something I should route through 911?" I think it had to do with something that was not an emergency but that was a way to get an incident number assigned to it.

Sort of related - I did a Google and realized a number of places have real time maps you can pull up of where 911 calls are being responded to. The one I brought up was for Seattle fire and medic. Not sure if there is much like that for criminal stuff. I still thought it was interesting though.

Mind you, I just see 911 as another tool in the toolbox. It doesn't replace what I might do on my own for self protection. In my case I believe if I had an intruder and called 911 they would come but due to distance are not likely to arrive in a timely manner.

Exactly, so many 911 calls are accidents or pranks. I remember when I was about three my dog ran away. All I knew was that I had been told "If you ever need help dial 911" so I did asking them to help me find my dog. The operator was very sweet(probably because of my age), but I imagine that isn't the only time they have ever received a call like that. My point is that a large number of 911 calls aren't even crimes, just a misinformed public or a buttdial on a phone with a "panic button."
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Suicidesoldier#1
I trust the police to handle the situation in a given time frame, but immediately, no, not at all.

Even assuming they got to my place in 2 minutes if there's a guy with a gun I mean, it's only a few seconds that's needed to get me, I mean right? O_o

Police are actually quite quick. I was on the roof of my house about to jump off and I had called my friend. The cops showed up just in time to stop me Saved my life that day. I am pretty sure there is a sort of priority system, kind of like flagging an email, but more efficient.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

Belle von Hellbond
Suicidesoldier#1
I trust the police to handle the situation in a given time frame, but immediately, no, not at all.

Even assuming they got to my place in 2 minutes if there's a guy with a gun I mean, it's only a few seconds that's needed to get me, I mean right? O_o

Police are actually quite quick. I was on the roof of my house about to jump off and I had called my friend. The cops showed up just in time to stop me Saved my life that day. I am pretty sure there is a sort of priority system, kind of like flagging an email, but more efficient.


It took 20 minutes for them to arrive, for me once; and then we accidentally called and it took like 30 seconds. xp

It really depends on where they are, and how far they are away from you, and how many cops are on patrol etc.; since they could just so happen to be strolling by your house, or could be 20 minutes away, it depends on the situation.


But cool that you got saved though! blaugh

I don't rely on them to arrive immediately, after all they're only human and drive around in cars. But as far as cleaning up crime, stopping more crimes from happening, just by patrolling a neighborhood to scare people off, it's pretty awesome. xp
GunsmithKitten's avatar

Aged Lunatic

The20
Old Blue Collar Joe
Chicago determining not to reply to more 911 calls.

The key point of it?

Quote:
McCarthy said Chicago police respond to 70 percent of 911 calls, compared to 30 to 50 percent in other cities.



So, as the courts have already stated, law enforcement doesn't have a legal obligation to protect you.
This just solidifies it. In other areas they claim 50% or less 911 response to the scene? And they wonder why some of us choose to own.
The Source
They’ll no longer come right away to reports of things like criminal damage to property, vehicle thefts, garage burglaries, or other crimes in which the suspect is no longer on the scene, and the victim isn’t in immediate danger.
Selective reading is fun!


And guess what? "Immediate danger" means only what the police say it is.

Good time to be a thief, however. Even if the cops get called on you, they likely aren't going to respond.
GunsmithKitten's avatar

Aged Lunatic

Belle von Hellbond
Suicidesoldier#1
I trust the police to handle the situation in a given time frame, but immediately, no, not at all.

Even assuming they got to my place in 2 minutes if there's a guy with a gun I mean, it's only a few seconds that's needed to get me, I mean right? O_o

Police are actually quite quick. I was on the roof of my house about to jump off and I had called my friend. The cops showed up just in time to stop me Saved my life that day. I am pretty sure there is a sort of priority system, kind of like flagging an email, but more efficient.


Where do you live, specifically? Is it rural or urban?
GunsmithKitten
The20
Old Blue Collar Joe
Chicago determining not to reply to more 911 calls.

The key point of it?

Quote:
McCarthy said Chicago police respond to 70 percent of 911 calls, compared to 30 to 50 percent in other cities.



So, as the courts have already stated, law enforcement doesn't have a legal obligation to protect you.
This just solidifies it. In other areas they claim 50% or less 911 response to the scene? And they wonder why some of us choose to own.
The Source
They’ll no longer come right away to reports of things like criminal damage to property, vehicle thefts, garage burglaries, or other crimes in which the suspect is no longer on the scene, and the victim isn’t in immediate danger.
Selective reading is fun!


And guess what? "Immediate danger" means only what the police say it is.

Good time to be a thief, however. Even if the cops get called on you, they likely aren't going to respond.
The suspect is still on the scene, however. I didn't bold that part because that wasn't what the OP was talking about.
The20
GunsmithKitten
The20
Old Blue Collar Joe
Chicago determining not to reply to more 911 calls.

The key point of it?

Quote:
McCarthy said Chicago police respond to 70 percent of 911 calls, compared to 30 to 50 percent in other cities.



So, as the courts have already stated, law enforcement doesn't have a legal obligation to protect you.
This just solidifies it. In other areas they claim 50% or less 911 response to the scene? And they wonder why some of us choose to own.
The Source
They’ll no longer come right away to reports of things like criminal damage to property, vehicle thefts, garage burglaries, or other crimes in which the suspect is no longer on the scene, and the victim isn’t in immediate danger.
Selective reading is fun!


And guess what? "Immediate danger" means only what the police say it is.

Good time to be a thief, however. Even if the cops get called on you, they likely aren't going to respond.
The suspect is still on the scene, however. I didn't bold that part because that wasn't what the OP was talking about.


All I was talking about is this idiotic belief that when you call 911 for ANY reason (remember, they have already been legally cleared of a 'duty' to protect. They can literally not do a damn thing and it is perfectly fine.) that the police will show up.
Nor is there a 'standard response time' listed on what they consider critical emergencies.
Now...those of you who wish to blindly trust them and expect almost a Minority Report type speed of police arrival, go for it.
As the running comment goes, you can order a pizza and a cop at the same time and usually get even money on which gets there first.

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