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If they can be humanely harvested and it doesn't hurt their chances of survival and they grow back ...who cares, then?
pockybot
The Living Force
pockybot
Well color me wrong. It's not African superstition so much as Asian black markets fueling the poachers all out blitz to try and get every rhino in south africa. One horn goes for a quarter of a million dollars.

All sorts of radical things are now being done, because at this rate they'll all be wiped out in less than a decade. Conservationists are putting tiny microchips embedded in horns. Some are injecting poison in rhino horns, which is harmless to the rhinos but which would be deadly to anyone consuming grounded up rhino horns.

I say just fire warning shots at poachers, and then actually fire at them if they don't turn away.

http://video.msnbc.msn.com/nightly-news/46486802/#46490990

Now I know people may say, of all the problems of the planet going on, who cares about rhinos? Well, if the poachers had their way, they'd kill not just all the rhinos but all the elephants. Maybe even tigers, lions...already the Serengetti is being threatened. It'd be like the dinosaurs, where a wide cross section of African natural wildlife is merely an artifact of the past.

It's bad enough we have the government of China destroying every chase of ancient Buddhist monasteries and giant statues to get at minerals in Afghanistan, or big oil continuing to destroy vital eco systems. But we have this insidious black market going for broke in trying to wipe out one of the most iconic animals on the planet.
Firing warning shots at poachers just leads to them firing back. You do not destroy tactical advantage with warning shots. You aim for the head (and hope they never come back).


I read a several new articles where it's beginning to sound like these poachers are more armed militias or drug cartels than simply poor guys with knifes and a rifle. They have AK-47s, night vision goggles, sometimes flanked by assisting helicopters and even paramilitary types.
So I guess it's serious business rather than just some opportunistic fellas.
Which is why it's a shoot first ask questions later style response.
FearlessDictator
Belonging To Night
Replace "rhinos" with "humans" in the future and the responses in this thread will likely be the same.


Blind Guardian the 2nd

Which raises the question... Why have these poachers not set up a farm to build rhinos??

Or, breed? idk


It's becoming increasingly rare to build rhinos anymore due to the lack of certified rhino mechanics. The demand for them isn't what it used to be.
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Belonging To Night
FearlessDictator
Belonging To Night
Replace "rhinos" with "humans" in the future and the responses in this thread will likely be the same.


Blind Guardian the 2nd

Which raises the question... Why have these poachers not set up a farm to build rhinos??

Or, breed? idk


It's becoming increasingly rare to build rhinos anymore due to the lack of certified rhino mechanics. The demand for them isn't what it used to be.
A shame, Night. A darned shame.

Our country just isn't the same with so few Rhinos. Who knows what will become of all those rhino mechanics out there? Someone ought to figure out a way to make more rhinos, and pronto.

Heh, Pronto Rhino.
*Shakes head sadly*
FearlessDictator
Which raises the question... Why have these poachers not set up a farm to build rhinos??

Or, breed? idk


Its status as an endangered species probably means they can't. Plus rhinos are likely to be a b*****d to breed.
pockybot
That's exactly what I'm talking about: greed. I was in error in believing local African culture was fueling this, which I had erroneously read. It seems to be mostly Asian black market which makes even a graham of ground up rhino horn innnnsanely expensive beyond belief.

I simply was talking about reports of Chinese scientists since 2008 have been demanding Rhino tusks and alleged rhino horn for arms deals between Zimbabwe and China.


Even if it was local African culture, I fail to see why that makes a difference. Both scenarios would involve a cultural belief in the healing properties of an animal part. Why is one worse than the other? Are the Africans entitled to "their" rhinos more than the Chinese?

I'm frequently frustrated by how much people seem to posit that these arm deals are "shady" in one way or another. It's already been a standard practice for European and American countries for a long time now, and people still seem to think there's something illicit about arms dealing. There isn't.
Eveille's avatar

Sparkling Reveler

pockybot
Blind Guardian the 2nd
pockybot
Well color me wrong. It's not African superstition so much as Asian black markets fueling the poachers all out blitz to try and get every rhino in south africa. One horn goes for a quarter of a million dollars.

All sorts of radical things are now being done, because at this rate they'll all be wiped out in less than a decade. Conservationists are putting tiny microchips embedded in horns. Some are injecting poison in rhino horns, which is harmless to the rhinos but which would be deadly to anyone consuming grounded up rhino horns.

I say just fire warning shots at poachers, and then actually fire at them if they don't turn away.

http://video.msnbc.msn.com/nightly-news/46486802/#46490990

Now I know people may say, of all the problems of the planet going on, who cares about rhinos? Well, if the poachers had their way, they'd kill not just all the rhinos but all the elephants. Maybe even tigers, lions...already the Serengetti is being threatened. It'd be like the dinosaurs, where a wide cross section of African natural wildlife is merely an artifact of the past.

It's bad enough we have the government of China destroying every chase of ancient Buddhist monasteries and giant statues to get at minerals in Afghanistan, or big oil continuing to destroy vital eco systems. But we have this insidious black market going for broke in trying to wipe out one of the most iconic animals on the planet.


I knew you'd be able to shove a conspiracy theory into this practice too. Have you not accepted by now that capitalism involves dicks doing any s**t for profit?


That's exactly what I'm talking about: greed. I was in error in believing local African culture was fueling this, which I had erroneously read. It seems to be mostly Asian black market which makes even a graham of ground up rhino horn innnnsanely expensive beyond belief.

I simply was talking about reports of Chinese scientists since 2008 have been demanding Rhino tusks and alleged rhino horn for arms deals between Zimbabwe and China.


The recent surge (tracked by TRAFFIC) comes mainly from Vietnam because of some asswipe high ranking official who claimed he cured his own cancer with rhino horn. It has invaded the thoughts of even western trained/educated doctors, bankers, and teachers. It isn't just some underground stupidity; it is everywhere and at all levels and that is the most disturbing part of it. The wash of ignorance that will kill off an entire evolutionary line with 0 evidence.

Prices are now double that of gold and cocaine and can range from 33-133$/gram. Obviously larger crime syndicates, as opposed to loan starving poachers, are now the ones running the rhino killing operations. Yemen had previously forbidden rhino dagger hilts and China had banned rhino in medicine.

Since 2006 authorities have only shot 22 poachers, while 1,000 rhinos have been lost. This may not sound like much but in 2007 there were only about 4k black and 17k white rhinos around. 2 subspecies have been declared extinct as of 2011, The Javan in Vietnam and the Western black rhino in Africa.

Main Article from NatGeo Talks about an Iraq vet protecting rhinos, the trade shifts over time and on the ground views from the Vietnamese.

Quote:
JOHN HUME BELIEVES no rhinos need to die to supply all the rhino horn the Vietnamese desire. The 69-year-old entrepreneur, who made a fortune in hotels and taxis before turning to game farming, has amassed one of the largest privately owned rhino herds in the world. Currently he has more than 700 white and black rhinos on two farms in South Africa and wants more.

"We take wool from sheep, why not horn from rhinos?" he asks one afternoon, sitting in the office of one of his farms as an albino parrot named Sebastian nuzzles his ear. "If you cut the horn about three inches above its base, it will grow back in two years. That means there is a never ending supply of rhino horn if we're smart enough to keep the bloody animals alive."

As our conversation continues, Hume becomes increasingly agitated. A Vietnamese hunter would happily dart the animal, take the horns, and let it live, he thunders. "But South African law requires the hunter to kill the rhino to export the horn as a trophy." He shakes his head at the illogic.

(Why this won't work for elephants): When an elephant's tusk is severed, the nerve inside can become infected, killing the animal. Also, darting an elephant is much more dangerous than darting a rhino, because of its greater size and the protectiveness of its herd.

Some of the resistance, he fears, is a cultural disconnect. "We basically are telling the Vietnamese that it is fine to kill an animal because our tradition of cutting a rhino's head off and putting it on a wall as a decoration is acceptable, but your tradition of cutting off its horn to use for medicine is abominable."


Additionally, rhinos and renewable energy

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