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MegaTurkey
Neverwise
Isn't there something in the human body or human meat that would cause negative effects if consumed often enough?


-Kali-La-Fae-
Yes actually. I'm like 99% sure thats a thing.


Lord Akhenaton
Well cannibalism wasn't uncommon in low-protein areas of the world. You had a member of your tribe. He/she died. Why not eat the corpse? It was more of a resource management issue than a moral one.


And then it becomes a public health issue, when you account for kuru in Papa New Guinea.
That case is extremely hotly debated, and the only thing that you can take from that, is that prion diseases, much like incestuous mating, only really becomes a huge public health problem when done over multiple generations. The most prevalent theory is that they had been eating their dead for many generations, which caused a buildup of prions.

Now, eating the meat of an Apex predator is generally not a good idea, and this is because of how toxins are transmitted throughout a food web. This is a simple fact of biology, animals that eat plants absorb all the toxins within the plants, and the predators of those plants gain the toxins of their prey, etc.

Consuming human meat grown in a lab would have neither of these issues, since prions would not be able to build up because the meat would not be grown through successive "generations". As well, toxins would not build up because the meat is not part of an animal that needs predation to survive.

Because of these facts, the only dangers of eating in-vitro grown human meat would be unknown dangers of in-vitro meat in general.
Alan Pistachio
The things is that I'm not going to touch the cannibalism thing with a ten-foot-pole, though I'll share the fact I think it's fine because in general we have over-population of the world, and so it would probably help with that. Anyways, that's my view on real cannibalism. What you're talking about can't even be considered cannibalism, because that thing was never actually living. So there wasn't much point in that discussion, in my opinion. So to speak, it's kewl in my book.

Living on a self-sustainable farm for a few years we raised a couple pigs. Guess what, we never once bought feed for our pigs.

We pulled weeds from our gardens and fed our pigs brush we had cut down and such things. It worked very efficiently. We also fed this to our chickens as well. The weeds and clippings contained a lot of bugs to give them added proteins too.

When we didn't feed them this, I worked at Sonic, and I brought back rotten food from there to feed to them. We also gave some of the rotten food to other people to feed to their pigs after word caught on. I also did this when I worked at a grocery store called Shetler's. I'm sure if you knew someone working locally in a smaller community at one of these places you could obtain food for your pigs like this.

I just wanted to show that meat is not wasteful, the way we produce meat is wasteful. =]
Feeding pigs rotted meats for a large part of their lifetime is a good way to produce pork that's not fit for human consumption. Grain-fed pork is tastier, and safer to cook since it results in a cleaner meat that doesn't need as much cooking.

It's also industry standard, since it means less lawsuits, and you're not going to get around this.
LuxuriousVacation
MegaTurkey
Neverwise
Isn't there something in the human body or human meat that would cause negative effects if consumed often enough?


-Kali-La-Fae-
Yes actually. I'm like 99% sure thats a thing.


Lord Akhenaton
Well cannibalism wasn't uncommon in low-protein areas of the world. You had a member of your tribe. He/she died. Why not eat the corpse? It was more of a resource management issue than a moral one.


And then it becomes a public health issue, when you account for kuru in Papa New Guinea.
That case is extremely hotly debated, and the only thing that you can take from that, is that prion diseases, much like incestuous mating, only really becomes a huge public health problem when done over multiple generations. The most prevalent theory is that they had been eating their dead for many generations, which caused a buildup of prions.

Now, eating the meat of an Apex predator is generally not a good idea, and this is because of how toxins are transmitted throughout a food web. This is a simple fact of biology, animals that eat plants absorb all the toxins within the plants, and the predators of those plants gain the toxins of their prey, etc.

Consuming human meat grown in a lab would have neither of these issues, since prions would not be able to build up because the meat would not be grown through successive "generations". As well, toxins would not build up because the meat is not part of an animal that needs predation to survive.

Because of these facts, the only dangers of eating in-vitro grown human meat would be unknown dangers of in-vitro meat in general.


I was solely referring to the example I replied to; the cannibalism of elders having died from natural causes in an isolated tribal setting. Of course prions cannot be present in tissue if it is cultured. I'm not entirely sure why I was quoted to be told all that, it's already perfectly clear to me; I'm well aware of microbiology, infectious diseases and public health thank you very much.
My friend was watching me play the walking dead video game and he (and the game, it seems) seemed to be quite alarmed with my cavalier attitude toward cannibalism.

I was a little freaked out with the specific situation - but the murder is what bothered me, not the cannibalism. I honestly don't see what all the fuss is about eating dead people, let alone eating dead people in a survival situation. I don't see what the big deal is. You're dead, you don't have anything more important on your schedule than dinner.
CuteMinta's avatar

Adored Sweetheart

O_o Hell no!

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