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Mountain Dew is still vile.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

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Mountain Dew is still vile.


Technically it comes in plastic containers. xp
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

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Jacque De Molay
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Worse, mountain dew has mountain dew in it, which is reason alone to never drink it for any reason.
Circular reasoning shouldn't be used because it's circular reasoning and is bad because it's bad.

It's not circular reasoning, it's self-reference. Mountain dew is nasty s**t. There a trillion better drinks out there, why the ******** are people worried about it containing flame retardant when it has enough sugar to kill a diabetic whale and tastes like piss?


Not all mountain dew has sugar, and sugar doesn't cause diabetes.

There are plenty of diabetics who didn't and still don't consume vast quantities of sugar, and many more people who consume vast quantities of sugar who have and likely never will get diabetes.


Diabetes symptoms can change or worsen (or get better) depending on the sugar content, but itself is not a cause.

Since there is no root cause to diabetes, it's more of a symptom anyways. xp
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

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Worse, mountain dew has mountain dew in it, which is reason alone to never drink it for any reason.


So... based on the justification that it's simply pure concentrated evil, no science or nothings, it's still tah ebilsz! ninja
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I read about half of that, before deciding that I have no ******** clue what you're trying to say.

But no more soda than I actually drink, it's sure to be pretty low on the list of "things that will probably kill me, someday."
Jacque De Molay
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Jacque De Molay
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Worse, mountain dew has mountain dew in it, which is reason alone to never drink it for any reason.
Circular reasoning shouldn't be used because it's circular reasoning and is bad because it's bad.

It's not circular reasoning, it's self-reference. Mountain dew is nasty s**t. There a trillion better drinks out there, why the ******** are people worried about it containing flame retardant when it has enough sugar to kill a diabetic whale and tastes like piss?
The reason why people aren't worried about sugar content is because most of them have been saturated in it all their lives. You think a fish notices water?

I don't mean as a health hazard, I mean as a taste hazard.
Suicidesoldier#1
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Jacque De Molay
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Worse, mountain dew has mountain dew in it, which is reason alone to never drink it for any reason.
Circular reasoning shouldn't be used because it's circular reasoning and is bad because it's bad.

It's not circular reasoning, it's self-reference. Mountain dew is nasty s**t. There a trillion better drinks out there, why the ******** are people worried about it containing flame retardant when it has enough sugar to kill a diabetic whale and tastes like piss?


Not all mountain dew has sugar, and sugar doesn't cause diabetes.

No, but it does cause cancer.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

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Je Nique vos Merdiers
Suicidesoldier#1
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Jacque De Molay
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Worse, mountain dew has mountain dew in it, which is reason alone to never drink it for any reason.
Circular reasoning shouldn't be used because it's circular reasoning and is bad because it's bad.

It's not circular reasoning, it's self-reference. Mountain dew is nasty s**t. There a trillion better drinks out there, why the ******** are people worried about it containing flame retardant when it has enough sugar to kill a diabetic whale and tastes like piss?


Not all mountain dew has sugar, and sugar doesn't cause diabetes.

No, but it does cause cancer.


Uh... sugar doesn't cause cancer in it's own right.

Maybe in the sense that it prolongs the life enough to reach the hayflick limit and get cancer but... otherwise it's not a direct cause per say. xp
Suicidesoldier#1
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Suicidesoldier#1
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Jacque De Molay
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Worse, mountain dew has mountain dew in it, which is reason alone to never drink it for any reason.
Circular reasoning shouldn't be used because it's circular reasoning and is bad because it's bad.

It's not circular reasoning, it's self-reference. Mountain dew is nasty s**t. There a trillion better drinks out there, why the ******** are people worried about it containing flame retardant when it has enough sugar to kill a diabetic whale and tastes like piss?


Not all mountain dew has sugar, and sugar doesn't cause diabetes.

No, but it does cause cancer.


Uh... sugar doesn't cause cancer in it's own right.

Maybe in the sense that it prolongs the life enough to reach the hayflick limit and get cancer but... otherwise it's not a direct cause per say. xp

Excess Sugar Linked to Cancer

Notice in that article it also describes the indirect way that excess sugar causes diabeetus. Sugar -> obesity -> diabeetus
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

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Suicidesoldier#1
Je Nique vos Merdiers
Suicidesoldier#1
Je Nique vos Merdiers

It's not circular reasoning, it's self-reference. Mountain dew is nasty s**t. There a trillion better drinks out there, why the ******** are people worried about it containing flame retardant when it has enough sugar to kill a diabetic whale and tastes like piss?


Not all mountain dew has sugar, and sugar doesn't cause diabetes.

No, but it does cause cancer.


Uh... sugar doesn't cause cancer in it's own right.

Maybe in the sense that it prolongs the life enough to reach the hayflick limit and get cancer but... otherwise it's not a direct cause per say. xp

Excess Sugar Linked to Cancer

Notice in that article it also describes the indirect way that excess sugar causes diabeetus. Sugar -> obesity -> diabeetus


Obesity doesn't cause diabetes.

One obesity is measured at weight divided by height and two there's no direct relationship that's ever been explained; if obesity is the cause of diabetes than no obese people wouldn't be diabetic and no diabetics wouldn't be obese.


Some of the fattest people in the world don't have diabetes at all. If fat levels caused diabetes then you would think that, no matter your sensitivity, practically all 600+ pound people would be diabetic, when they aren't.

Since diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance, or a lack of insulin production, and the predominant symptoms are caused by a lack of energy and high blood sugar, changing blood sugar levels can effect some of the symptoms; this can change as a result of diet and exercise, which can also effect obesity levels. But when a person is lacking sugar they will be extremely tired if not die/go into a coma. That's why many diabetics have to take insulin; this is due to the inability to absorb the sugar. So diabetics often consume more sugar (making them simply store it instead of get energy out of it) since it doesn't give them their fill, which causes even more problem with blood sugar; while this can be alleviated with diet and exercise, the absorption of sugar cannot. Hence you are only focusing on one part of the problem and it's not a real solution. So while they often say all the symptoms are gone when your blood sugar is low, for a diabetic this could mean that they're getting even less sugar than they were before, which can be really bad for them; in essence diabetics are often obese due to the fact they need to consume vast quantities of sugar, and that they get tired easily since they have trouble turning sugar into energy, not so much that obesity is causing the diabetes.


Since obesity can result from a lot of things, as can diabetes, it's a silly assertion.

Your article states "β-catenin is strictly dependent on sugar levels." Since β-catenin genes are prone to mutation, it is connected to cancer, but it also is dependent on proteins, ligands, and a host of other things. It is usually regulated by Tyrosine Kinase and GSK-3, which are regulated by the above. So it's actually not directly dependent on sugar levels, meaning there can be other causes for the spike, and more β-catenin doesn't necessarily mean more mutations anyways.
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Suicidesoldier#1
Mountain dew has flame retardant in it! It's called water.

But, apparently, there has been recent concern over Brominated vegetable oil, or "BVO". Brominated vegetable oil is vegetable oil that has been brominated. More or less, they pump bromine in it, to change the density, so it won't float to the surface, like most oils do in water. It’s allowed to be used at a level not to exceed 15 parts per million, according to the FDA, but most soft drinks use about 8 parts per million. Assuming it was pure bromine, you would need about .5-1 gram a day to cause bromism, which are side effects from bromine. Since Bromine has a long elimination half life, 9-12 days, compared to say oxygen at a few minutes, at most, or say water, it can accumulate in the system. The therapeutic dose of bromide is about 3-5 grams of bromide, partially explaining why chronic toxicity (bromism) was once so common. Assuming you consumed 1 gram of bromine for several months, it would still take some 9-12 days for half of this to be gone, and then a longer time for the rest of it. Damaging doses are therefore somewhere around double what the toxicity levels are, since even after the half life is run out, half still remains.

That being said, at 8 parts per million, in a 2000 milliliter thing of mountain dew, that means there are some .00025 mililiters of bromine per 2 liters of mountain dew, or at 1.33 g/mL, or .0003325 grams per 2 liter. To reach half a gram, this would take approximately 1500 2 liters, or 3000 liters. So, if you drank 3000 liters a day, for months on end, you could potentially get sick. Who knew?


Despite this, there has been one documented case of bromism, from a guy who did drink 2-4 liters of squirt a day (still a lot). Apparently, he had an extreme sensitivity to it and was drinking some random off brand grapefruit soda thingy.

This guy seemed to have an extreme sensitivity to it.


It's arguable that if you are sensitive, you'd want to avoid sodas with large quantities of brominated vegetable oil in them, or at least weirdo brands with who knows what in it with 4 liters a day for 20 years.

While this is a good argument against using it, potential unknown sensitivities, lots of people have food allergies, more common to peanut butter, nuts, chocolate, eggs, and even things like chicken and beef. More people are likely to have problems from food poisoning or food allergies with these things than from brominated vegetable oil. In addition, bromine tablets are often used in pools and hot tubs, instead of chlorine; if you've been in a bromine pool, you've likely been exposed to higher concentrations (usually 30 ppm) and inhaled or absorbed higher quantities, given the raw volume of the water, than is even realistically possible from Mountain Dew or other sodas. That being said, this is mostly insignificant; the largest problem with the guy was his unusual ability to retain the bromine, until hemodialysis cleared out most of it and all the symptoms disappeared with no permanent damage relatively quickly.


So if your kidneys don't work, and can't flush out build up waste, you may want to avoid large quantities of soda over many years, or just get some hemodialysis every so often to help clear out build up.

But otherwise I think this controversy is rather silly since it's mostly harmless. Do I want brominated vegetable oil in there? Not really, but their replacement is ester gum, which is, like most types of gums, is just, empty gummy stuff that can build up based on the fact it's so viscous in the first place. It's arguable it's harmless, as well, but no more harmless than consuming vast quantities of sand or sawdust (bacterial free, of course). You could replace it I suppose, but it wouldn't do much.


Despite this! Due to popular demand, pepsi decided to replace it. This has made some believe it's dangerous; but really, if a million people said, hey, we want a cherry version, they'd probably make it. That's how business works.

I think it's kind of silly and an over reaction, but what do you think, ED? Do you mind brominated vegetable oil in soft drinks, or do you think they should switch over to ester gum? Personally I don't care too much, but it would be nice if they made it into a healthier drink; imagine spiking vitamins or something. You could make it so your average American could get way more nutrients, and possibly not worry about calories; but, then you might have problems with that, idk. So, what do you think ED?!

So, according to this study (of which, the only part I read was the first sentence) my niece must be fireproof, as she drinks vast quantities of Mountain Dew. This "Water" you speak of, it helps prevent fires, yes? Then we must all drink Mountain Dew and become fireproof.


The human body is 60% water.

Get a syringe with 40% water, inject yourself with it, and you'll turn into pure water.

Yes. We must do this. We can then turn our soldiers into water and then they can hide in the enemy's water supply and ambush them when they are thirsty, or even let themselves be ingested and kill them from the inside.
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Barrett Jaeger
Suicidesoldier#1
Mountain dew has flame retardant in it! It's called water.

But, apparently, there has been recent concern over Brominated vegetable oil, or "BVO". Brominated vegetable oil is vegetable oil that has been brominated. More or less, they pump bromine in it, to change the density, so it won't float to the surface, like most oils do in water. It’s allowed to be used at a level not to exceed 15 parts per million, according to the FDA, but most soft drinks use about 8 parts per million. Assuming it was pure bromine, you would need about .5-1 gram a day to cause bromism, which are side effects from bromine. Since Bromine has a long elimination half life, 9-12 days, compared to say oxygen at a few minutes, at most, or say water, it can accumulate in the system. The therapeutic dose of bromide is about 3-5 grams of bromide, partially explaining why chronic toxicity (bromism) was once so common. Assuming you consumed 1 gram of bromine for several months, it would still take some 9-12 days for half of this to be gone, and then a longer time for the rest of it. Damaging doses are therefore somewhere around double what the toxicity levels are, since even after the half life is run out, half still remains.

That being said, at 8 parts per million, in a 2000 milliliter thing of mountain dew, that means there are some .00025 mililiters of bromine per 2 liters of mountain dew, or at 1.33 g/mL, or .0003325 grams per 2 liter. To reach half a gram, this would take approximately 1500 2 liters, or 3000 liters. So, if you drank 3000 liters a day, for months on end, you could potentially get sick. Who knew?


Despite this, there has been one documented case of bromism, from a guy who did drink 2-4 liters of squirt a day (still a lot). Apparently, he had an extreme sensitivity to it and was drinking some random off brand grapefruit soda thingy.

This guy seemed to have an extreme sensitivity to it.


It's arguable that if you are sensitive, you'd want to avoid sodas with large quantities of brominated vegetable oil in them, or at least weirdo brands with who knows what in it with 4 liters a day for 20 years.

While this is a good argument against using it, potential unknown sensitivities, lots of people have food allergies, more common to peanut butter, nuts, chocolate, eggs, and even things like chicken and beef. More people are likely to have problems from food poisoning or food allergies with these things than from brominated vegetable oil. In addition, bromine tablets are often used in pools and hot tubs, instead of chlorine; if you've been in a bromine pool, you've likely been exposed to higher concentrations (usually 30 ppm) and inhaled or absorbed higher quantities, given the raw volume of the water, than is even realistically possible from Mountain Dew or other sodas. That being said, this is mostly insignificant; the largest problem with the guy was his unusual ability to retain the bromine, until hemodialysis cleared out most of it and all the symptoms disappeared with no permanent damage relatively quickly.


So if your kidneys don't work, and can't flush out build up waste, you may want to avoid large quantities of soda over many years, or just get some hemodialysis every so often to help clear out build up.

But otherwise I think this controversy is rather silly since it's mostly harmless. Do I want brominated vegetable oil in there? Not really, but their replacement is ester gum, which is, like most types of gums, is just, empty gummy stuff that can build up based on the fact it's so viscous in the first place. It's arguable it's harmless, as well, but no more harmless than consuming vast quantities of sand or sawdust (bacterial free, of course). You could replace it I suppose, but it wouldn't do much.


Despite this! Due to popular demand, pepsi decided to replace it. This has made some believe it's dangerous; but really, if a million people said, hey, we want a cherry version, they'd probably make it. That's how business works.

I think it's kind of silly and an over reaction, but what do you think, ED? Do you mind brominated vegetable oil in soft drinks, or do you think they should switch over to ester gum? Personally I don't care too much, but it would be nice if they made it into a healthier drink; imagine spiking vitamins or something. You could make it so your average American could get way more nutrients, and possibly not worry about calories; but, then you might have problems with that, idk. So, what do you think ED?!

So, according to this study (of which, the only part I read was the first sentence) my niece must be fireproof, as she drinks vast quantities of Mountain Dew. This "Water" you speak of, it helps prevent fires, yes? Then we must all drink Mountain Dew and become fireproof.


The human body is 60% water.

Get a syringe with 40% water, inject yourself with it, and you'll turn into pure water.

Yes. We must do this. We can then turn our soldiers into water and then they can hide in the enemy's water supply and ambush them when they are thirsty, or even let themselves be ingested and kill them from the inside.
What if they have filters?
Generic Infantry's avatar

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Jacque De Molay
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Barrett Jaeger
Suicidesoldier#1
Mountain dew has flame retardant in it! It's called water.

But, apparently, there has been recent concern over Brominated vegetable oil, or "BVO". Brominated vegetable oil is vegetable oil that has been brominated. More or less, they pump bromine in it, to change the density, so it won't float to the surface, like most oils do in water. It’s allowed to be used at a level not to exceed 15 parts per million, according to the FDA, but most soft drinks use about 8 parts per million. Assuming it was pure bromine, you would need about .5-1 gram a day to cause bromism, which are side effects from bromine. Since Bromine has a long elimination half life, 9-12 days, compared to say oxygen at a few minutes, at most, or say water, it can accumulate in the system. The therapeutic dose of bromide is about 3-5 grams of bromide, partially explaining why chronic toxicity (bromism) was once so common. Assuming you consumed 1 gram of bromine for several months, it would still take some 9-12 days for half of this to be gone, and then a longer time for the rest of it. Damaging doses are therefore somewhere around double what the toxicity levels are, since even after the half life is run out, half still remains.

That being said, at 8 parts per million, in a 2000 milliliter thing of mountain dew, that means there are some .00025 mililiters of bromine per 2 liters of mountain dew, or at 1.33 g/mL, or .0003325 grams per 2 liter. To reach half a gram, this would take approximately 1500 2 liters, or 3000 liters. So, if you drank 3000 liters a day, for months on end, you could potentially get sick. Who knew?


Despite this, there has been one documented case of bromism, from a guy who did drink 2-4 liters of squirt a day (still a lot). Apparently, he had an extreme sensitivity to it and was drinking some random off brand grapefruit soda thingy.

This guy seemed to have an extreme sensitivity to it.


It's arguable that if you are sensitive, you'd want to avoid sodas with large quantities of brominated vegetable oil in them, or at least weirdo brands with who knows what in it with 4 liters a day for 20 years.

While this is a good argument against using it, potential unknown sensitivities, lots of people have food allergies, more common to peanut butter, nuts, chocolate, eggs, and even things like chicken and beef. More people are likely to have problems from food poisoning or food allergies with these things than from brominated vegetable oil. In addition, bromine tablets are often used in pools and hot tubs, instead of chlorine; if you've been in a bromine pool, you've likely been exposed to higher concentrations (usually 30 ppm) and inhaled or absorbed higher quantities, given the raw volume of the water, than is even realistically possible from Mountain Dew or other sodas. That being said, this is mostly insignificant; the largest problem with the guy was his unusual ability to retain the bromine, until hemodialysis cleared out most of it and all the symptoms disappeared with no permanent damage relatively quickly.


So if your kidneys don't work, and can't flush out build up waste, you may want to avoid large quantities of soda over many years, or just get some hemodialysis every so often to help clear out build up.

But otherwise I think this controversy is rather silly since it's mostly harmless. Do I want brominated vegetable oil in there? Not really, but their replacement is ester gum, which is, like most types of gums, is just, empty gummy stuff that can build up based on the fact it's so viscous in the first place. It's arguable it's harmless, as well, but no more harmless than consuming vast quantities of sand or sawdust (bacterial free, of course). You could replace it I suppose, but it wouldn't do much.


Despite this! Due to popular demand, pepsi decided to replace it. This has made some believe it's dangerous; but really, if a million people said, hey, we want a cherry version, they'd probably make it. That's how business works.

I think it's kind of silly and an over reaction, but what do you think, ED? Do you mind brominated vegetable oil in soft drinks, or do you think they should switch over to ester gum? Personally I don't care too much, but it would be nice if they made it into a healthier drink; imagine spiking vitamins or something. You could make it so your average American could get way more nutrients, and possibly not worry about calories; but, then you might have problems with that, idk. So, what do you think ED?!

So, according to this study (of which, the only part I read was the first sentence) my niece must be fireproof, as she drinks vast quantities of Mountain Dew. This "Water" you speak of, it helps prevent fires, yes? Then we must all drink Mountain Dew and become fireproof.


The human body is 60% water.

Get a syringe with 40% water, inject yourself with it, and you'll turn into pure water.

Yes. We must do this. We can then turn our soldiers into water and then they can hide in the enemy's water supply and ambush them when they are thirsty, or even let themselves be ingested and kill them from the inside.
What if they have filters?

Then God help us.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

Fanatical Zealot

Barrett Jaeger
Jacque De Molay
Barrett Jaeger
Project 429
Barrett Jaeger
Suicidesoldier#1
Mountain dew has flame retardant in it! It's called water.

But, apparently, there has been recent concern over Brominated vegetable oil, or "BVO". Brominated vegetable oil is vegetable oil that has been brominated. More or less, they pump bromine in it, to change the density, so it won't float to the surface, like most oils do in water. It’s allowed to be used at a level not to exceed 15 parts per million, according to the FDA, but most soft drinks use about 8 parts per million. Assuming it was pure bromine, you would need about .5-1 gram a day to cause bromism, which are side effects from bromine. Since Bromine has a long elimination half life, 9-12 days, compared to say oxygen at a few minutes, at most, or say water, it can accumulate in the system. The therapeutic dose of bromide is about 3-5 grams of bromide, partially explaining why chronic toxicity (bromism) was once so common. Assuming you consumed 1 gram of bromine for several months, it would still take some 9-12 days for half of this to be gone, and then a longer time for the rest of it. Damaging doses are therefore somewhere around double what the toxicity levels are, since even after the half life is run out, half still remains.

That being said, at 8 parts per million, in a 2000 milliliter thing of mountain dew, that means there are some .00025 mililiters of bromine per 2 liters of mountain dew, or at 1.33 g/mL, or .0003325 grams per 2 liter. To reach half a gram, this would take approximately 1500 2 liters, or 3000 liters. So, if you drank 3000 liters a day, for months on end, you could potentially get sick. Who knew?


Despite this, there has been one documented case of bromism, from a guy who did drink 2-4 liters of squirt a day (still a lot). Apparently, he had an extreme sensitivity to it and was drinking some random off brand grapefruit soda thingy.

This guy seemed to have an extreme sensitivity to it.


It's arguable that if you are sensitive, you'd want to avoid sodas with large quantities of brominated vegetable oil in them, or at least weirdo brands with who knows what in it with 4 liters a day for 20 years.

While this is a good argument against using it, potential unknown sensitivities, lots of people have food allergies, more common to peanut butter, nuts, chocolate, eggs, and even things like chicken and beef. More people are likely to have problems from food poisoning or food allergies with these things than from brominated vegetable oil. In addition, bromine tablets are often used in pools and hot tubs, instead of chlorine; if you've been in a bromine pool, you've likely been exposed to higher concentrations (usually 30 ppm) and inhaled or absorbed higher quantities, given the raw volume of the water, than is even realistically possible from Mountain Dew or other sodas. That being said, this is mostly insignificant; the largest problem with the guy was his unusual ability to retain the bromine, until hemodialysis cleared out most of it and all the symptoms disappeared with no permanent damage relatively quickly.


So if your kidneys don't work, and can't flush out build up waste, you may want to avoid large quantities of soda over many years, or just get some hemodialysis every so often to help clear out build up.

But otherwise I think this controversy is rather silly since it's mostly harmless. Do I want brominated vegetable oil in there? Not really, but their replacement is ester gum, which is, like most types of gums, is just, empty gummy stuff that can build up based on the fact it's so viscous in the first place. It's arguable it's harmless, as well, but no more harmless than consuming vast quantities of sand or sawdust (bacterial free, of course). You could replace it I suppose, but it wouldn't do much.


Despite this! Due to popular demand, pepsi decided to replace it. This has made some believe it's dangerous; but really, if a million people said, hey, we want a cherry version, they'd probably make it. That's how business works.

I think it's kind of silly and an over reaction, but what do you think, ED? Do you mind brominated vegetable oil in soft drinks, or do you think they should switch over to ester gum? Personally I don't care too much, but it would be nice if they made it into a healthier drink; imagine spiking vitamins or something. You could make it so your average American could get way more nutrients, and possibly not worry about calories; but, then you might have problems with that, idk. So, what do you think ED?!

So, according to this study (of which, the only part I read was the first sentence) my niece must be fireproof, as she drinks vast quantities of Mountain Dew. This "Water" you speak of, it helps prevent fires, yes? Then we must all drink Mountain Dew and become fireproof.


The human body is 60% water.

Get a syringe with 40% water, inject yourself with it, and you'll turn into pure water.

Yes. We must do this. We can then turn our soldiers into water and then they can hide in the enemy's water supply and ambush them when they are thirsty, or even let themselves be ingested and kill them from the inside.
What if they have filters?

Then God help us.


Unless we can slip through the filters. ninja

With a multi facet form we could reform without taking damage.
Knobist's avatar

Hilarious Prophet

Suicidesoldier#1
Barrett Jaeger
Jacque De Molay
Barrett Jaeger
Project 429


The human body is 60% water.

Get a syringe with 40% water, inject yourself with it, and you'll turn into pure water.

Yes. We must do this. We can then turn our soldiers into water and then they can hide in the enemy's water supply and ambush them when they are thirsty, or even let themselves be ingested and kill them from the inside.
What if they have filters?

Then God help us.


Unless we can slip through the filters. ninja

With a multi facet form we could reform without taking damage.
Can't they just urinate and flush us out?

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