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Gunnisberg's avatar

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I have no understanding of how physics work in space. But he is performing this in earths orbit. And I might as well ask, how effective are fired projectiles in space, like shooting a gun.

inb4 animu defies logic.
Suicidesoldier#1's avatar

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It would... go through space, and without gravity or air resistance would just keep going. : P
Aside from there being no sound and no air resistance to slow it down it works like on earth.
Physics are exactly the same in space as they are on earth.
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Gunnisberg
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I have no understanding of how physics work in space. But he is performing this in earths orbit. And I might as well ask, how effective are fired projectiles in space, like shooting a gun.

inb4 animu defies logic.


It would work better there, than here, actually.

Down here, we have gravity to contend with. You have to account for the downward arc, and the limited range. Not so, in space. No gravity to bring the arrow to the ground. It will literally just keep darting off, until it hits something, or burns up in the atmosphere of some gravitational object.
Heimdalr's avatar

Mega Noob

Arrows would fire very poorly as there is no traction for the fletchings and hence no stability. They'd still go on through space, however, just not with the arrowhead in the direction of travel all the time.
One could not fire a conventional firearm in space.
lord_william_nilsson's avatar

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Heimdalr
Arrows would fire very poorly as there is no traction for the fletchings and hence no stability. They'd still go on through space, however, just not with the arrowhead in the direction of travel all the time.


The fletchlings are there to counteract the air resistance on the tip. And in space there is no air resistance. If you shoot it straight, it will fly straight.
Fermionic
One could not fire a conventional firearm in space.
You can, if you adjust the propellant.
Heimdalr's avatar

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lord_william_nilsson
Heimdalr
Arrows would fire very poorly as there is no traction for the fletchings and hence no stability. They'd still go on through space, however, just not with the arrowhead in the direction of travel all the time.


The fletchlings are there to counteract the air resistance on the tip. And in space there is no air resistance. If you shoot it straight, it will fly straight.

The fletchings are there in order to create drag to counteract the back's propensity to fly in front of the tip. Try to shoot an arrow without fletchings straight; it's suddenly lost its usefulness as a weapon.
SmallTownGuy's avatar

Beloved Elder

From his viewpoint, the arrow would fly in a straight line without gravity causing much visible arc. If he waited long enough, he would realize the arrow would be orbiting the earth in a different orbit from himself. It might tumble head-over-heels (point-over-fletchings?) but without air drag that wouldn't affect the path.

From anyone else's viewpoint, the arrow's orbit would be only slightly different from his. Arrow speeds are very small compared to typical orbital speeds, so the act of firing the arrow would only place it in a very slightly different orbit.

If he's firing the arrow at some enemy's ship, that enemy is probably well armored against it. The typical space pebble would hit it harder.
Does the arrow have a rocket engine in the tail-end of the shaft? If so, it could work pretty well.
lord_william_nilsson's avatar

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Heimdalr
lord_william_nilsson
Heimdalr
Arrows would fire very poorly as there is no traction for the fletchings and hence no stability. They'd still go on through space, however, just not with the arrowhead in the direction of travel all the time.


The fletchlings are there to counteract the air resistance on the tip. And in space there is no air resistance. If you shoot it straight, it will fly straight.

The fletchings are there in order to create drag to counteract the back's propensity to fly in front of the tip. Try to shoot an arrow without fletchings straight; it's suddenly lost its usefulness as a weapon.


And the back has this tendency because of the higher amount of drag on the tip. Since there is no drag in space, this no longer applies.

I know it becomes less usefull inside our atmosphere, but that's not what we're discussing.

Theoretically, if there is a straight force behind the arrow, the arrow will fly straight.
I doubt, however, that there is a shooter who can shoot an arrow without the slightest amount of spin. This small force, in the atmosphere, would be corrected by the fletchlings. In space however, it would not.
Heimdalr's avatar

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lord_william_nilsson
Heimdalr
lord_william_nilsson
Heimdalr
Arrows would fire very poorly as there is no traction for the fletchings and hence no stability. They'd still go on through space, however, just not with the arrowhead in the direction of travel all the time.


The fletchlings are there to counteract the air resistance on the tip. And in space there is no air resistance. If you shoot it straight, it will fly straight.

The fletchings are there in order to create drag to counteract the back's propensity to fly in front of the tip. Try to shoot an arrow without fletchings straight; it's suddenly lost its usefulness as a weapon.


And the back has this tendency because of the higher amount of drag on the tip. Since there is no drag in space, this no longer applies.

I know it becomes less usefull inside our atmosphere, but that's not what we're discussing.

Theoretically, if there is a straight force behind the arrow, the arrow will fly straight.
I doubt, however, that there is a shooter who can shoot an arrow without the slightest amount of spin. This small force, in the atmosphere, would be corrected by the fletchlings. In space however, it would not.

Agreed.
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SmallTownGuy
From his viewpoint, the arrow would fly in a straight line without gravity causing much visible arc. If he waited long enough, he would realize the arrow would be orbiting the earth in a different orbit from himself. It might tumble head-over-heels (point-over-fletchings?) but without air drag that wouldn't affect the path.

From anyone else's viewpoint, the arrow's orbit would be only slightly different from his. Arrow speeds are very small compared to typical orbital speeds, so the act of firing the arrow would only place it in a very slightly different orbit.

If he's firing the arrow at some enemy's ship, that enemy is probably well armored against it. The typical space pebble would hit it harder.


Depends on the velocity of the enemy ship

If it's going say 190 km/sec that arrow would do nuclear warhead levels of damage
The20
Fermionic
One could not fire a conventional firearm in space.
You can, if you adjust the propellant.


Conventional to a T, I see.

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