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Do you know your martial arts lineage? Explain in a post.

Yep 0.66666666666667 66.7% [ 24 ]
Nup 0.27777777777778 27.8% [ 10 ]
line-what? 0.055555555555556 5.6% [ 2 ]
Total Votes:[ 36 ]
antaine
Karl_Krebs
I have watched every match and I must say I am a happy camper. Not to mention Us finally has its first Gold medal in judo!

Yeah I was very interested to see how that final between Kayla Harrison and Gemma Gibbons panned out. The BBC was showing the women's matches because they had a stake in the UK athelete coming through. Both artists showed immense skill in the semi-finals against their respective opponents, so I don't think you could have had a more deserving match-up in the final there.
Gemma beat some supposedly very impression opponents but ended up just getting out-foxed by Kayla in the last match. I wouldn't argue the toss with the results though.

l Omie-Gosh l
I read in Black Belt magazine one instructor said it's best to be at least 2nd degree black belt in your chosen art first before cross-training. He advised to get a strong knowledge and background first before branching out to others styles.

As a matter of interest was he referring to cross-training in general or across two similiarly focussed arts.

The reason I ask is because it would seem to me that two similiar striking arts have the capacity to confuse you at an early stage a lot more than two arts which have quite different focus.

I don't speak from experience per say, merely from observing the other clubs at our university. For example our University offers ITF Tae kwon do, Shotokan karate, shaolin kung fu and Lau Gar kick boxing. When I was watching the shaolin club train I noticed that they effectively have many of the same "stock" stances that tae kwon do does: horse/sitting stances, lunge/forward/walking stances, back/L-stances etc. However obviously there are many minute differences across the arts.

There is a fella in our TKD class and he is also a member of the karate club, often I find he's having to be corrected on details in his stances. For example he found a tkd L-stance rather difficult and kept slipping into a shotokan back stance.

Basically I would think as you go through gradings, those minute details could count as strikes against you as you try to move forward. Arguably though at lot of these details are different arts quibbling over minutiae and what really matters is the fundamental concepts behind the movements, but that wont change the fact that you could potentially be doing your head in.

Conversely I would think that something like Judo and Karate focus (especially at the early to intermediate stage) on such wildly different areas that the potential confusion wouldn't be nearly as much of an issue.

Just a thought or two on the matter. Like I said I'm toying with the idea of trying Judo again, so maybe I'll find out for myself. It could be the case that it'll be an example of trying to learn French and Mandarin at the same time, potentially doing your head in XP
personally i think you shouldn't try cross training striking styles unless both have major gaps in their training in which case you should drop both and find one that is an all round striking or stand up style, and i don't think you can effectively learn any style while trying to learn another. you should have a strong foundation of the basics of one style, before you begin another style.
sekchi-toguchi
personally i think you shouldn't try cross training striking styles unless both have major gaps in their training in which case you should drop both and find one that is an all round striking or stand up style, and i don't think you can effectively learn any style while trying to learn another. you should have a strong foundation of the basics of one style, before you begin another style.

Not that I necessarily disagree, but I don't suppose you'd elaborate on the reasoning behind that?

Also I think in fairness to any traditional arts, a gap in the training is going to have more to do with the way it is taught than the art itself. At the highest and most complete level any art worth its salt is going to address all areas of self defence from strikes to joint locks to take downs and everything in between.

However there's no getting around the fact that a lot of clubs are going to have a large sporting focus. Competitive sparring is a sporting activity, no matter what way you look at it. Bearing this in mind, on what basis do you reach your conclusion? I mean if someone wants to enjoy both boxing and wrestling for their different sporting aspects would you say the same? I mean you wouldn't turn around to someone and say: "don't take up archery until you have a solid grounding in swimming" razz
antaine
sekchi-toguchi
personally i think you shouldn't try cross training striking styles unless both have major gaps in their training in which case you should drop both and find one that is an all round striking or stand up style, and i don't think you can effectively learn any style while trying to learn another. you should have a strong foundation of the basics of one style, before you begin another style.

Not that I necessarily disagree, but I don't suppose you'd elaborate on the reasoning behind that?

Also I think in fairness to any traditional arts, a gap in the training is going to have more to do with the way it is taught than the art itself. At the highest and most complete level any art worth its salt is going to address all areas of self defence from strikes to joint locks to take downs and everything in between.

However there's no getting around the fact that a lot of clubs are going to have a large sporting focus. Competitive sparring is a sporting activity, no matter what way you look at it. Bearing this in mind, on what basis do you reach your conclusion? I mean if someone wants to enjoy both boxing and wrestling for their different sporting aspects would you say the same? I mean you wouldn't turn around to someone and say: "don't take up archery until you have a solid grounding in swimming" razz
i would tell anyone not to try devoting any large amount of time and money to learn more than one complicated thing at a time. most people can't handle to learn more than one thing at a time like that, and learn it effectively.
if you want to learn something you need to be able to focus your attention on learning that.
this is something i've learned through personal experience learning, as well as teaching.
sekchi-toguchi
antaine
sekchi-toguchi
personally i think you shouldn't try cross training striking styles unless both have major gaps in their training in which case you should drop both and find one that is an all round striking or stand up style, and i don't think you can effectively learn any style while trying to learn another. you should have a strong foundation of the basics of one style, before you begin another style.

Not that I necessarily disagree, but I don't suppose you'd elaborate on the reasoning behind that?

Also I think in fairness to any traditional arts, a gap in the training is going to have more to do with the way it is taught than the art itself. At the highest and most complete level any art worth its salt is going to address all areas of self defence from strikes to joint locks to take downs and everything in between.

However there's no getting around the fact that a lot of clubs are going to have a large sporting focus. Competitive sparring is a sporting activity, no matter what way you look at it. Bearing this in mind, on what basis do you reach your conclusion? I mean if someone wants to enjoy both boxing and wrestling for their different sporting aspects would you say the same? I mean you wouldn't turn around to someone and say: "don't take up archery until you have a solid grounding in swimming" razz
i would tell anyone not to try devoting any large amount of time and money to learn more than one complicated thing at a time. most people can't handle to learn more than one thing at a time like that, and learn it effectively.
if you want to learn something you need to be able to focus your attention on learning that.
this is something i've learned through personal experience learning, as well as teaching.

I have been teaching for a while, and of course I have been training even longer than that. I have had several students over the years who take Taekwondo with me, but are also committed Little League, dance classes, gymnastics, etc. More often than not, it seems, they have been my best students. They focus more and try harder, and the result is that they learn more quickly and effectively.
goingd
sekchi-toguchi
antaine
sekchi-toguchi
personally i think you shouldn't try cross training striking styles unless both have major gaps in their training in which case you should drop both and find one that is an all round striking or stand up style, and i don't think you can effectively learn any style while trying to learn another. you should have a strong foundation of the basics of one style, before you begin another style.

Not that I necessarily disagree, but I don't suppose you'd elaborate on the reasoning behind that?

Also I think in fairness to any traditional arts, a gap in the training is going to have more to do with the way it is taught than the art itself. At the highest and most complete level any art worth its salt is going to address all areas of self defence from strikes to joint locks to take downs and everything in between.

However there's no getting around the fact that a lot of clubs are going to have a large sporting focus. Competitive sparring is a sporting activity, no matter what way you look at it. Bearing this in mind, on what basis do you reach your conclusion? I mean if someone wants to enjoy both boxing and wrestling for their different sporting aspects would you say the same? I mean you wouldn't turn around to someone and say: "don't take up archery until you have a solid grounding in swimming" razz
i would tell anyone not to try devoting any large amount of time and money to learn more than one complicated thing at a time. most people can't handle to learn more than one thing at a time like that, and learn it effectively.
if you want to learn something you need to be able to focus your attention on learning that.
this is something i've learned through personal experience learning, as well as teaching.

I have been teaching for a while, and of course I have been training even longer than that. I have had several students over the years who take Taekwondo with me, but are also committed Little League, dance classes, gymnastics, etc. More often than not, it seems, they have been my best students. They focus more and try harder, and the result is that they learn more quickly and effectively.
but did they start all the activities at the same time or did they do one for a while then pick up another? my first two years of karate i was also playing football, but i had been playing for 3 yrs before that and already had the basics of tackling, ball handling, etc, so i had no problem being able to focus on learning karate.
sekchi-toguchi
goingd
sekchi-toguchi
antaine
sekchi-toguchi
personally i think you shouldn't try cross training striking styles unless both have major gaps in their training in which case you should drop both and find one that is an all round striking or stand up style, and i don't think you can effectively learn any style while trying to learn another. you should have a strong foundation of the basics of one style, before you begin another style.

Not that I necessarily disagree, but I don't suppose you'd elaborate on the reasoning behind that?

Also I think in fairness to any traditional arts, a gap in the training is going to have more to do with the way it is taught than the art itself. At the highest and most complete level any art worth its salt is going to address all areas of self defence from strikes to joint locks to take downs and everything in between.

However there's no getting around the fact that a lot of clubs are going to have a large sporting focus. Competitive sparring is a sporting activity, no matter what way you look at it. Bearing this in mind, on what basis do you reach your conclusion? I mean if someone wants to enjoy both boxing and wrestling for their different sporting aspects would you say the same? I mean you wouldn't turn around to someone and say: "don't take up archery until you have a solid grounding in swimming" razz
i would tell anyone not to try devoting any large amount of time and money to learn more than one complicated thing at a time. most people can't handle to learn more than one thing at a time like that, and learn it effectively.
if you want to learn something you need to be able to focus your attention on learning that.
this is something i've learned through personal experience learning, as well as teaching.

I have been teaching for a while, and of course I have been training even longer than that. I have had several students over the years who take Taekwondo with me, but are also committed Little League, dance classes, gymnastics, etc. More often than not, it seems, they have been my best students. They focus more and try harder, and the result is that they learn more quickly and effectively.
but did they start all the activities at the same time or did they do one for a while then pick up another? my first two years of karate i was also playing football, but i had been playing for 3 yrs before that and already had the basics of tackling, ball handling, etc, so i had no problem being able to focus on learning karate.

Every student has been different, but yes, often times they started multiple activities within months of each other.
Koden_BuGeisha

Never heard of him or that style. From watching it though, it is a very, VERY Hapkido-esc style, and that said, it feels like the guy has at least some Kenpo background.
goingd

Never heard of him or that style. From watching it though, it is a very, VERY Hapkido-esc style, and that said, it feels like the guy has at least some Kenpo background.

His background is a few styles of Ninjistu and Judo if I remember correctly.
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Koden_BuGeisha



Has some elements from Daito-ryu.
Koden_BuGeisha
I have heard of him before there was a thread about him in a martial arts forum I frequent and he ended up posting in said thread. I agree with scrappers over all consensus. "Basically he appears no worse than your average "ninja" teacher out there. I agree with the general consensus that he is perhaps NOT the worlds greatest martial artist or fighter. But besides the questionable nature of his instruction, he does not appear to be peddling complete bullshit. I wouldn't take a lesson from him, nor would I recommend him to a friend," No offense intended to the man,or his students what so ever.
Why do you say that Karl? What I mean is, what drew you to that conclusion?
Karl_Krebs
Koden_BuGeisha
I have heard of him before there was a thread about him in a martial arts forum I frequent and he ended up posting in said thread. I agree with scrappers over all consensus. "Basically he appears no worse than your average "ninja" teacher out there. I agree with the general consensus that he is perhaps NOT the worlds greatest martial artist or fighter. But besides the questionable nature of his instruction, he does not appear to be peddling complete bullshit. I wouldn't take a lesson from him, nor would I recommend him to a friend," No offense intended to the man,or his students what so ever.

Never seen him before, but what he is doing there is Aikijutsu. It seems like he's mixing it with karate and some nindo. I doubt the practicality on some of the stuff he's demonstrating on that vid, but it looks pretty.
What are everyone's thought on Steven Seagal ... in regards to him like "training" fighters such as Anderson Silva and Lyoto Machida ...
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rockettemma
What are everyone's thought on Steven Seagal ... in regards to him like "training" fighters such as Anderson Silva and Lyoto Machida ...


I saw the videos and most of the moves he showed them were designed for self-defense not sport fighting like MMA so I'm not sure if they work in the ring. But if the fighters learned something from him then its all good.

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