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Early in the 2005 reboot, there was this annoying daytime tv look to the show. Of course it faded over time, and now the show is beautifully colored.
I also didn't like how strictly the doctor aged in the new series too, the first season, he was 900, then the next season, he was 901. It makes it seem like his regenerations are getting closer and closer. Before, when he didn't have a companion with him, he could have gone on many years worth of adventures that we didn't see, allowing more wiggle room for stories (not to mention fan fiction wink ). But when he started to age one year at a time, it made his adventures seem smaller. sad
is it just me or is the guy kinda cute?
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I am in general displeased with Steven Moffat. Which is sort of an unfortunate turn of events, considering...but my distaste for Moffat's gender-biased, box of stereotypes and misogynistic commentary to fans is reaching levels of intense hatred. And yet I still love Doctor Who fandom and there are still good things coming out of the series so I find it difficult to quit watching it. But in general, Moffat, while claiming to advocate visibility of "strong" female characters and queer characters hasn't put any solid effort into these issues and often subverts them (I have such a love-hate relationship with the writing of Amy). Arguably, he doesn't have to, but to claim that you do and do little more than make token drop references?

I feel like he's been given this platform and he's squandering it in the name of over complicated story arches and reductionist roles for women and atop that, not utilizing the fact that he has some serious talent to work with on the show; Matt Smith deserves more opportunities to show off his acting chops and we deserve to have less Amy/Rory thrown in our face at every turn. As precious as they are.

Blah, word vomit.
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I am in general displeased with Steven Moffat. Which is sort of an unfortunate turn of events, considering...but my distaste for Moffat's gender-biased, box of stereotypes and misogynistic commentary to fans is reaching levels of intense hatred. And yet I still love Doctor Who fandom and there are still good things coming out of the series so I find it difficult to quit watching it. But in general, Moffat, while claiming to advocate visibility of "strong" female characters and queer characters hasn't put any solid effort into these issues and often subverts them (I have such a love-hate relationship with the writing of Amy). Arguably, he doesn't have to, but to claim that you do and do little more than make token drop references?

I feel like he's been given this platform and he's squandering it in the name of over complicated story arches and reductionist roles for women and atop that, not utilizing the fact that he has some serious talent to work with on the show; Matt Smith deserves more opportunities to show off his acting chops and we deserve to have less Amy/Rory thrown in our face at every turn. As precious as they are.

Blah, word vomit.


Really? confused

As a feminist (and a serious one at that, Ursula LeGuin style) I'm actually very pleased with Moffat's female characters in Doctor Who. They don't lose to the ones he created for the Coupling series in terms of bravery, decisiveness, assertiveness and fighting spirit. He creates strong, intelligent, self-assured women I never get tired of watching, unlike his predecessor. There were many instances I had to stop watching because of the derogatory stereotypes Davies liked to use (got migraines). I think Rose's mom was the most infuriating female ever to appear onscreen, closely followed by Donna Noble (almost stopped watching the entire series when she was the companion)...

The only problem I had with Moffat was the romance angle in River Song's story, I was expecting more. Romance seemed to cheapen the story and looked like the easy way out.
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I miss old DW when the show was about the doctor Don't get me wrong i watch New Who but the old ones are so much better .
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Izayoi13
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I am in general displeased with Steven Moffat. Which is sort of an unfortunate turn of events, considering...but my distaste for Moffat's gender-biased, box of stereotypes and misogynistic commentary to fans is reaching levels of intense hatred. And yet I still love Doctor Who fandom and there are still good things coming out of the series so I find it difficult to quit watching it. But in general, Moffat, while claiming to advocate visibility of "strong" female characters and queer characters hasn't put any solid effort into these issues and often subverts them (I have such a love-hate relationship with the writing of Amy). Arguably, he doesn't have to, but to claim that you do and do little more than make token drop references?

I feel like he's been given this platform and he's squandering it in the name of over complicated story arches and reductionist roles for women and atop that, not utilizing the fact that he has some serious talent to work with on the show; Matt Smith deserves more opportunities to show off his acting chops and we deserve to have less Amy/Rory thrown in our face at every turn. As precious as they are.

Blah, word vomit.


Really? confused

As a feminist (and a serious one at that, Ursula LeGuin style) I'm actually very pleased with Moffat's female characters in Doctor Who. They don't lose to the ones he created for the Coupling series in terms of bravery, decisiveness, assertiveness and fighting spirit. He creates strong, intelligent, self-assured women I never get tired of watching, unlike his predecessor. There were many instances I had to stop watching because of the derogatory stereotypes Davies liked to use (got migraines). I think Rose's mom was the most infuriating female ever to appear onscreen, closely followed by Donna Noble (almost stopped watching the entire series when she was the companion)...

The only problem I had with Moffat was the romance angle in River Song's story, I was expecting more. Romance seemed to cheapen the story and looked like the easy way out.


Ah, the River Song romance, don't even get me started!

I have so many issues with Moffat it really is difficult to know where to start. I also consider myself a feminist (after what style I'm not sure, maybe Judith Butler, but I've got a lot of teachers) and queer so there is an element of personal affront that I take to certain decisions he's made. Not all of his writing is bad; some of it is legitimately good. He's created some of my favourite episodes and monsters.

Instead of me writing a huge essay on things that have already been thoroughly looked through, I have some links for few collections/articles that I found pretty much spot on to my reactions/musings about Moffat. I'm sorry to hit you with a bunch of text, but I haven't got time to write my own two-cents in an essay.

http://stfu-moffat.tumblr.com/post/25598791367/steven-moffat-is-a-douchebag-the-masterlist

http://feministing.com/2011/12/22/the-temp-from-chiswick-why-i-love-donna-noble/

http://tigerbeatdown.com/2011/08/04/the-girl-who-waited-why-i-hate-amy-pond/
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Ah, the River Song romance, don't even get me started!

I have so many issues with Moffat it really is difficult to know where to start. I also consider myself a feminist (after what style I'm not sure, maybe Judith Butler, but I've got a lot of teachers) and queer so there is an element of personal affront that I take to certain decisions he's made. Not all of his writing is bad; some of it is legitimately good. He's created some of my favourite episodes and monsters.

Instead of me writing a huge essay on things that have already been thoroughly looked through, I have some links for few collections/articles that I found pretty much spot on to my reactions/musings about Moffat. I'm sorry to hit you with a bunch of text, but I haven't got time to write my own two-cents in an essay.

http://stfu-moffat.tumblr.com/post/25598791367/steven-moffat-is-a-douchebag-the-masterlist

http://feministing.com/2011/12/22/the-temp-from-chiswick-why-i-love-donna-noble/

http://tigerbeatdown.com/2011/08/04/the-girl-who-waited-why-i-hate-amy-pond/


Okay, I've seen what you mean but I don't agree with any of it except some of the critiques of River Song concerning the direction her story had taken. I still think Donna Noble is an uncouth, brusque character with less marbles than any other woman on the show (except, maybe, Rose Tyler's mom), the only good thing I can say about her would be 'yes, good, she didn't have the hots for the doctor'. Personally, I don't care about Moffat's comments but to be honest he's the reason I started watching Doctor Who in the first place. I've seen 'The Empty Child' and I simply had to watch 'The Doctor Dances' afterwards (the fantastic acting of Christopher Eccleston didn't hurt, though I've never heard of the actor before). A couple other episodes flew by without really catching my interest until I saw 'The Girl in the Fireplace'. Only then I went back, watched the older episodes of the new series and started following the show regularly.

I think Amy Pond is the only long-time companion I love unconditionally (another would be Jack Harkness but he wasn't around much) and seeing how her story began it's no wonder she had a huge crush for the Doctor. She tried to deal with it when he was absent, made her move and gave her best when he was by her side, moved on when he wasn't interested. As not-a-long-time-fan I think Moffat's writing may not be agreeing with the classic interpretation of Doctor Who. The Daleks and Cybermen I find archaic and disagreeable were avoided by Moffat until now. That theory would certainly explain the Moffat-lovers and Moffat-haters (and not a lot of shades inbetween)... ^^'
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Izayoi13
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Izayoi13
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Ah, the River Song romance, don't even get me started!

I have so many issues with Moffat it really is difficult to know where to start. I also consider myself a feminist (after what style I'm not sure, maybe Judith Butler, but I've got a lot of teachers) and queer so there is an element of personal affront that I take to certain decisions he's made. Not all of his writing is bad; some of it is legitimately good. He's created some of my favourite episodes and monsters.

Instead of me writing a huge essay on things that have already been thoroughly looked through, I have some links for few collections/articles that I found pretty much spot on to my reactions/musings about Moffat. I'm sorry to hit you with a bunch of text, but I haven't got time to write my own two-cents in an essay.

http://stfu-moffat.tumblr.com/post/25598791367/steven-moffat-is-a-douchebag-the-masterlist

http://feministing.com/2011/12/22/the-temp-from-chiswick-why-i-love-donna-noble/

http://tigerbeatdown.com/2011/08/04/the-girl-who-waited-why-i-hate-amy-pond/


Okay, I've seen what you mean but I don't agree with any of it except some of the critiques of River Song concerning the direction her story had taken. I still think Donna Noble is an uncouth, brusque character with less marbles than any other woman on the show (except, maybe, Rose Tyler's mom), the only good thing I can say about her would be 'yes, good, she didn't have the hots for the doctor'. Personally, I don't care about Moffat's comments but to be honest he's the reason I started watching Doctor Who in the first place. I've seen 'The Empty Child' and I simply had to watch 'The Doctor Dances' afterwards (the fantastic acting of Christopher Eccleston didn't hurt, though I've never heard of the actor before). A couple other episodes flew by without really catching my interest until I saw 'The Girl in the Fireplace'. Only then I went back, watched the older episodes of the new series and started following the show regularly.

I think Amy Pond is the only long-time companion I love unconditionally (another would be Jack Harkness but he wasn't around much) and seeing how her story began it's no wonder she had a huge crush for the Doctor. She tried to deal with it when he was absent, made her move and gave her best when he was by her side, moved on when he wasn't interested. As not-a-long-time-fan I think Moffat's writing may not be agreeing with the classic interpretation of Doctor Who. The Daleks and Cybermen I find archaic and disagreeable were avoided by Moffat until now. That theory would certainly explain the Moffat-lovers and Moffat-haters (and not a lot of shades inbetween)... ^^'


It's not Daleks and Cybermen that I find archaic and disagreeable, it's the use of typical and tired stereotypes that Amy and River got built off of (and Irene Adler in Sherlock). These are the two most important women in the series and the first is presented as kissogram (it's fine to use sexuality but I think it says something when that's the first thing we see of her after being introduced to her as a child, as though sexuality is the only definition of maturity for women) and the second becomes a device only ever defined by her connection to the Doctor.

Despite this, I adore them both, as people, but as pieces of a story they've been done a disservice. Amy in particular, is fantastic; she's not afraid to quip back at the Doctor, is plenty brave when faced with the unreasonable and yes, she did move past her romantic interest in him to something that was much more interesting; her friendship with him. All of this is amazing! And fantastic! But, as the story goes, she's reduced down to her reproductive organs for a story that came off as really stiff and undeveloped; not only does she have a child, but the child is taken and BAM! then the child is actually her childhood best friend who was never mentioned before; I can't imagine how many mixed feeling her and Rory could have had about that, but instead, it was more just "eh, River's pretty cool, so no loss". But by not exploring the emotional side of that situation or even really giving it a mention, Amy (while still being fantastic and a character I like) really does become just a rented uterus.

If Moffat is a feminist of any denomination he is at best second wave; particularly in reference to fundamental difference. If he is a feminist of any denomination he is not a critical one, again, emblematic of second wave. In fact, he's frequently dismissive and condescending on any occasion that anyone has tried to bring it up for discussion (dialogue, not argument) and waivers his responsibility with what amounts to the claim of "I'm a writer, it's fiction" or with binary logics. Fiction or not, it matters how you represent people.

The reason I like Donna is because she could be anyone but she does have particular skill set that may seem like it's not useful but she finds unexpected ways to find application of these skills. So I'm not sure how she hasn't got any "marbles"? Yeah, she's hot-headed and brusque and can get on your nerves and will shout at the world before she looks at it; some people are like this. This doesn't make them any more or less of their projected gender or any more or less intelligent.

There were a lot moments of discomfort with Rose's mum. She was stereotype. But she was also incredibly human; her concern was over her family because Rose was her only family. Trusting outside persons with the only family she has in the world; she'll always be suspicious of 'outsiders'. Maybe she's uneducated and a bit 'dim', but she knows what matters. Her writing was admittedly weak though; I wish so much that there'd been more moments where she could have shined and surprised not just the Doctor (because I’m not interested in the establishment male arbitrators) but to surprise herself.
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It's not Daleks and Cybermen that I find archaic and disagreeable, it's the use of typical and tired stereotypes that Amy and River got built off of (and Irene Adler in Sherlock). These are the two most important women in the series and the first is presented as kissogram (it's fine to use sexuality but I think it says something when that's the first thing we see of her after being introduced to her as a child, as though sexuality is the only definition of maturity for women) and the second becomes a device only ever defined by her connection to the Doctor.

Despite this, I adore them both, as people, but as pieces of a story they've been done a disservice. Amy in particular, is fantastic; she's not afraid to quip back at the Doctor, is plenty brave when faced with the unreasonable and yes, she did move past her romantic interest in him to something that was much more interesting; her friendship with him. All of this is amazing! And fantastic! But, as the story goes, she's reduced down to her reproductive organs for a story that came off as really stiff and undeveloped; not only does she have a child, but the child is taken and BAM! then the child is actually her childhood best friend who was never mentioned before; I can't imagine how many mixed feeling her and Rory could have had about that, but instead, it was more just "eh, River's pretty cool, so no loss". But by not exploring the emotional side of that situation or even really giving it a mention, Amy (while still being fantastic and a character I like) really does become just a rented uterus.

If Moffat is a feminist of any denomination he is at best second wave; particularly in reference to fundamental difference. If he is a feminist of any denomination he is not a critical one, again, emblematic of second wave. In fact, he's frequently dismissive and condescending on any occasion that anyone has tried to bring it up for discussion (dialogue, not argument) and waivers his responsibility with what amounts to the claim of "I'm a writer, it's fiction" or with binary logics. Fiction or not, it matters how you represent people.

The reason I like Donna is because she could be anyone but she does have particular skill set that may seem like it's not useful but she finds unexpected ways to find application of these skills. So I'm not sure how she hasn't got any "marbles"? Yeah, she's hot-headed and brusque and can get on your nerves and will shout at the world before she looks at it; some people are like this. This doesn't make them any more or less of their projected gender or any more or less intelligent.

There were a lot moments of discomfort with Rose's mum. She was stereotype. But she was also incredibly human; her concern was over her family because Rose was her only family. Trusting outside persons with the only family she has in the world; she'll always be suspicious of 'outsiders'. Maybe she's uneducated and a bit 'dim', but she knows what matters. Her writing was admittedly weak though; I wish so much that there'd been more moments where she could have shined and surprised not just the Doctor (because I’m not interested in the establishment male arbitrators) but to surprise herself.


I sat down and started to write about how addressing Amy as a rented uterus would be uncalled for, just because her reproductive abilities came into play and we were reminded that she was actually a woman for a couple of episodes in one story arc. Then I realized I'd start repeating myself sooner or later because our outlooks on the subject are too different; what bothers you bears little importance to me and what I can't stand to watch is acceptable for you. Clearly, I will not be able to convince you of Amy's perfect charm and Moffat's brilliant unoffending female characters (I found Irene Adler from Sherlock to be entertaining) and you cannot persuade me to be a Donna-follower (she is a valid archetype and I have seen many people like her in real life, I just prefer to stay as far away from them as is humanly and respectfully possible). Suffice to say I cannot watch reruns of the episodes Donna, Daleks and Cybermen were in. Rose's mom, I'm too irritated by, to be able to comment rationally.

Whether Moffat is a feminist or not I take great pleasure in watching the women he creates and have no trouble or discomfort putting myself in their shoes. Maybe his Doctor Who women had less chance to shine and stand their ground compared to the ones in Coupling or Jekyll but I blame the structure of the series for that (many people already complaining of 'too much Amy'). As long as he's the writer of Doctor Who and human drama is an important part of the series I'll continue to be a loyal follower.

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