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Ceeshnia's avatar

Omnipresent Phantom

* Ceeshnia
* Across the US
* I am Lithuanian, Apache, German and Tsalagi. I grew up in various places in the US due to a "gypsy" mother, which is just fancy for saying we were a family that moved a lot and were not military.
When I first lived in New Mexico, I got a taste of some of the traditions of the Natives. I noticed I love their languages the most, they are beautiful and generally not as harsh as English. I've had more personal experiences since, between the Lakota, Black Feet, Tsalagi and other nations and clans.

Living in Utah I had more interaction and observation of the Utahn Mormons as well as the Mexicans. Many good people, many differences. One of the things that stood out the most was the Mexicans and how they seemed to band together as a family and help each other, even if it was their first time meeting. When we sold our house to a family who used to live in Mexico, the bank said they had to do some fix-ups before the loan could be approved (such as the roof was older and needed re-doing. It was just my mother, my sister and myself living there and we didn't have the financial ability to fix it up). There were some Mexicans that lived up the street walking by, and even though they had never met the new family, they stopped and helped until the work was done. That kindness and community feeling left a general love of their culture in me. That was when I really noticed the differences between cultures.

When I moved to New York at the beginning of my Sophomore year, I was in for a wide awakening. Long Island, New York, one of my favorite places. I met people from Italy, Turkey, Indonesia and just... New Yorkers. They have a much different rhythm than everyone else, and broke me out of my shell. Growing up with a soft voice and an accent, I was used to people prodding me about my nationality no matter how many times I assured them I was from the US. In New York they were more concerned with getting me to just talk and open up and get to know me than whether or not I was a foreigner. In a strange sense I was as the east and the west are such different places it's surreal, and New Yorkers near the city are even more so. Being surrounded by the diversity and open mindedness I was able to finally work on my art without being put down and I was able to thrive in all of my classes. It is one of the places I miss sorely. Though I didn't live there long, it felt somewhat like home.

We had to move from New York due to finances, and ended up in southern Colorado. Back into an entirely different world, people there were convinced I had lived in New York longer than I attested to. For health reasons of my mother's, however, we shortly moved to Montana. Montana, not much for race or culture diversity, but you did have some as far as personalities.

From Montana I moved back to New York after I graduated, this time to upstate. I loved a lot of the people, but was coaxed into moving to Alaska. From there I decided to move back into living with my sister who had moved to Maine, where I currently preside.
With all of the different customs, cultures and areas I have been exposed to, I have been learning to match the flow of different areas quickly making smoother transitions and matching my unique style into that flow without causing uneasiness though some may find my mini hats, my fingerless gloves and the occasional drawings on my face... different. It is also much easier to understand people from different backgrounds, cultures and preferences. I intend to continue learning the different flows of the world.
ghost v1's avatar

Blessed Sweetheart

* Username: SNSDGorJess
* Title of Story biggrin iversity
* Content of story which describes why you like diversity, and how you feel it has made your world a better place to be!

Having diversity makes people realize the wonderful-ness of all the different cultures around us. And allows us to be more open-minded about different things that make up an individual (:
Learning another's culture is really special, because there's so many differences yet similarities we all share. And each person's language is amazing too, because their words have meanings just like your own as well. So no matter how foreign something is, it all connects together in the end with the similarities and meanings shared.
Len Inazuma's avatar

Loverboy

DEATHS_TORMENT


Hi Um...sorry but I'm interested in the item you use for your shoes...and I was wondering if you could tell me it's name... Thank you redface
Good luck to everyone <3
And congratulations to all who won <333
Hope I will win on my second entry. Love diversity!
Wish I could enter the contest.

Sadly, my town is so racially isolated that the first time I spoke to a black person, I was 12.
Good luck to all the entrants, tho!
SNSDGorJess


Such a pretty avi!
siskataya's avatar

Tipsy Visionary

14,050 Points
  • Jack-pot 100
  • Battle: Rogue 100
  • Cheercrusher 50
Hey everyone!

Ok, so now that I am back from last week's horrid flu, I am happy to announce the winners for Thursday and Friday of last week!:

Page 37, Post 8
Kirowyn Love
* Kirowyn Love
* Opening my Eyes and Stomach
* When I was growing up, I didn't live in a very diverse area. It was mostly Caucasian with one or two Black or Hispanic families. It was something that I didn't really notice until I went to college. The college I went to had SO many different students. My first dive into another culture took place there. A girl in one of my classes happened to be Japanese and invited me over to her room to hang out and have a bite to eat. She made one of the most delicious things I've ever tasted - rolled omelet. After just one bite, there was no turning back. I was in love with Japanese food. I started hanging out with more Japanese kids, and trying new things. This turned into me being curious about so many other kinds of foods - Indian, Spanish, German, Chinese, Hawaiian... the list goes on. I am so thankful that I went to such a diverse school so I could experience all of that!


Page 37, Post 2:
xkumikoxlovesxaxkitsune
* Username: xkumikoxlovesxaxkitsune

* Title of Story: As different as they seem to be...

* I haven't actually cared much about the differences in people until I started attending high school. I went to a new school, and although I'm used to transferring schools during my elementary years, this time it was all different. It was like being transported into a world so different from how I perceived it.

My schoolmates' personalities, for one, are already an example of the diversity I wasn't much aware of before. I've learned that some could be really mean, some could be sincerely kind, and some could be great pretenders. I've been bullied for having a brace for my spine. Well, at least that's what I think the main reason is. It was by this time that I've learned that people have their own perceptions and doesn't always see you based on what you want them to think of you. But as time passed, the bullying toned down, until it stopped. And that's when I realized that there are quite a lot of things we all have in common.

We all make mistakes. We've been hurt by others. We've hurt others too, whether we are conscious of it or not. We've all felt pain, happiness, laziness, sleepiness, hunger, impatience, anger, and sometimes the sense of being alone and lost. We're bound to make mistakes every now and then, but one thing's for sure---we all have this ability to change.

Now that I'm in my final year of high school, I've known more about my batchmates. And as one of the writers for our yearbook, I've realized that we all have our own share of stories of happiness, embarassment, heartbreak, love, or just pure randomness. And if we look into these personal stories, we'd get to see that they are all quite similar to each other, only the characters and how the events happened is what distinguishes them.

As different as they seem to be for us, we are all similar in one way or the other. And why not? We are all human, and we're not perfect. Only the God above is. So we should all learn to respect each others' differences, and understand that they also have feelings, which is just normal for a human being like me and you.


Page 37, Post 12
Tainted Tarts
* Tainted Tarts
* Occupational Therapy <3
*This would be my second entry, I do hope win this time since I didn't win the last time n.n

I am a student of occupational therapy, and because of that I am exposed to people with disabilities. I have been given the chance to learn that in the past, mentally ill people were maltreated and were treated as animals. It was sad to know how their illness was viewed as an irreversible sickness. Just because a part of their body and their genetics went out wrong, they are treated inhumanely.
Over the decades, progress has made these people to be accepted. This diversity with out abilities has actually opened up my perspective of the world and even if they didn't try doing anything to me, they have taught me valuable lessons.
First, that we are all humans despite our form and race and genetic codes. Second, we deserve as much love as we think we should and so does everyone else. Third, we take for granted the simplicity of life. the simple movements we do everyday as standing up and walking, could be so hard for others. Fourth, we should always take time to appreciate the gifts God has given to us because we tend to not notice them until we lose them.
Without doing anything they have turned my life into a better one, they have taught me lessons that I cannot only apply in the world of rehabilitation but also in other aspects of my life. I know I have more lessons to learn as I start my career treating them <3


Page 38, Post 1:
Ceeshnia
* Ceeshnia
* Across the US
* I am Lithuanian, Apache, German and Tsalagi. I grew up in various places in the US due to a "gypsy" mother, which is just fancy for saying we were a family that moved a lot and were not military.
When I first lived in New Mexico, I got a taste of some of the traditions of the Natives. I noticed I love their languages the most, they are beautiful and generally not as harsh as English. I've had more personal experiences since, between the Lakota, Black Feet, Tsalagi and other nations and clans.

Living in Utah I had more interaction and observation of the Utahn Mormons as well as the Mexicans. Many good people, many differences. One of the things that stood out the most was the Mexicans and how they seemed to band together as a family and help each other, even if it was their first time meeting. When we sold our house to a family who used to live in Mexico, the bank said they had to do some fix-ups before the loan could be approved (such as the roof was older and needed re-doing. It was just my mother, my sister and myself living there and we didn't have the financial ability to fix it up). There were some Mexicans that lived up the street walking by, and even though they had never met the new family, they stopped and helped until the work was done. That kindness and community feeling left a general love of their culture in me. That was when I really noticed the differences between cultures.

When I moved to New York at the beginning of my Sophomore year, I was in for a wide awakening. Long Island, New York, one of my favorite places. I met people from Italy, Turkey, Indonesia and just... New Yorkers. They have a much different rhythm than everyone else, and broke me out of my shell. Growing up with a soft voice and an accent, I was used to people prodding me about my nationality no matter how many times I assured them I was from the US. In New York they were more concerned with getting me to just talk and open up and get to know me than whether or not I was a foreigner. In a strange sense I was as the east and the west are such different places it's surreal, and New Yorkers near the city are even more so. Being surrounded by the diversity and open mindedness I was able to finally work on my art without being put down and I was able to thrive in all of my classes. It is one of the places I miss sorely. Though I didn't live there long, it felt somewhat like home.

We had to move from New York due to finances, and ended up in southern Colorado. Back into an entirely different world, people there were convinced I had lived in New York longer than I attested to. For health reasons of my mother's, however, we shortly moved to Montana. Montana, not much for race or culture diversity, but you did have some as far as personalities.

From Montana I moved back to New York after I graduated, this time to upstate. I loved a lot of the people, but was coaxed into moving to Alaska. From there I decided to move back into living with my sister who had moved to Maine, where I currently preside.
With all of the different customs, cultures and areas I have been exposed to, I have been learning to match the flow of different areas quickly making smoother transitions and matching my unique style into that flow without causing uneasiness though some may find my mini hats, my fingerless gloves and the occasional drawings on my face... different. It is also much easier to understand people from different backgrounds, cultures and preferences. I intend to continue learning the different flows of the world.


This contest is now over, but thank you all for participating, and for sharing your stories of how diversity has improved your life! Your messages of acceptance and understanding remind all of us that there is beauty in everyone and that sometimes those things that make us different from each other do, in fact, bring us closer together in unique and wonderful ways!

Sisky

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