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Currently I have this motherboard, which by default came with SATA II ports; If I apply this card to my PCI-E slot, will I be able boot from a SATA III SSD?
Yes you should be able to.
Disconsented
Yes you should be able to.

In your personal opinion, seeing as how there's only one pci-e x16 slot, would you rather have a new graphics card and a 1TB-3TB hdd, or a OCZ Vector 256GB?
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Yes you should be able to.

In your personal opinion, seeing as how there's only one pci-e x16 slot, would you rather have a new graphics card and a 1TB-3TB hdd, or a OCZ Vector 256GB?

Depends on the graphics card (both new and current). If the upgrade is marginal then a SSD will be better overall because of increased general responsiveness.
Disconsented
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Yes you should be able to.

In your personal opinion, seeing as how there's only one pci-e x16 slot, would you rather have a new graphics card and a 1TB-3TB hdd, or a OCZ Vector 256GB?

Depends on the graphics card (both new and current). If the upgrade is marginal then a SSD will be better overall because of increased general responsiveness.

Right on. I don't game much anyways.
I can't even get Halo 2 PC to run properly.
Do you think it's the fault of my stock graphics card?
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Yes you should be able to.

In your personal opinion, seeing as how there's only one pci-e x16 slot, would you rather have a new graphics card and a 1TB-3TB hdd, or a OCZ Vector 256GB?

Depends on the graphics card (both new and current). If the upgrade is marginal then a SSD will be better overall because of increased general responsiveness.

Right on. I don't game much anyways.
I can't even get Halo 2 PC to run properly.
Do you think it's the fault of my stock graphics card?

The halo 2 port was quite frankly crap but concerning other games CPU and/or GPU may be at fault but since you don't game much a SSD is a better choice.
Disconsented
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Yes you should be able to.

In your personal opinion, seeing as how there's only one pci-e x16 slot, would you rather have a new graphics card and a 1TB-3TB hdd, or a OCZ Vector 256GB?

Depends on the graphics card (both new and current). If the upgrade is marginal then a SSD will be better overall because of increased general responsiveness.

Right on. I don't game much anyways.
I can't even get Halo 2 PC to run properly.
Do you think it's the fault of my stock graphics card?

The halo 2 port was quite frankly crap but concerning other games CPU and/or GPU may be at fault but since you don't game much a SSD is a better choice.

I grew up on the game, still love it.
I've got an AMD Athlon Duel-Core 2.30GHz
According to my motherboard specs I should be able to upgrade to an AMD Athlon 64 X2 with Dual Core technology up to 4800+ (up to 65 Watt TDP)
Care to help me shop for a better CPU?
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Yes you should be able to.

In your personal opinion, seeing as how there's only one pci-e x16 slot, would you rather have a new graphics card and a 1TB-3TB hdd, or a OCZ Vector 256GB?

Depends on the graphics card (both new and current). If the upgrade is marginal then a SSD will be better overall because of increased general responsiveness.

Right on. I don't game much anyways.
I can't even get Halo 2 PC to run properly.
Do you think it's the fault of my stock graphics card?

The halo 2 port was quite frankly crap but concerning other games CPU and/or GPU may be at fault but since you don't game much a SSD is a better choice.

I grew up on the game, still love it.
I've got an AMD Athlon Duel-Core 2.30GHz
According to my motherboard specs I should be able to upgrade to an AMD Athlon 64 X2 with Dual Core technology up to 4800+ (up to 65 Watt TDP)
Care to help me shop for a better CPU?

It is on the AM2 socket while it is upgradeable I would advice saving for an 1155 socket motherboard so you can take advantage of intels i3 processors.
Disconsented
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented
Areweeffingserious
Disconsented

Depends on the graphics card (both new and current). If the upgrade is marginal then a SSD will be better overall because of increased general responsiveness.

Right on. I don't game much anyways.
I can't even get Halo 2 PC to run properly.
Do you think it's the fault of my stock graphics card?

The halo 2 port was quite frankly crap but concerning other games CPU and/or GPU may be at fault but since you don't game much a SSD is a better choice.

I grew up on the game, still love it.
I've got an AMD Athlon Duel-Core 2.30GHz
According to my motherboard specs I should be able to upgrade to an AMD Athlon 64 X2 with Dual Core technology up to 4800+ (up to 65 Watt TDP)
Care to help me shop for a better CPU?

It is on the AM2 socket while it is upgradeable I would advice saving for an 1155 socket motherboard so you can take advantage of intels i3 processors.

While we're on the subject, my AMD processor doesn't have any thermal paste applied, and seemingly operates fine. Is there technology that allows my CPU and heat sink to work with each other, should I apply some? Recently I opened an older PC for a good cleaning, and after cleaning the fans heat sink, I discovered white goo on the CPU. I removed the goo to see the manufacturer and GHz. (Intel Pentium 4 2.53GHz)
Anyways, should I not turn this computer back on until I buy and apply some thermal paste? What kind? What brand?
Jaguar__5's avatar

Genius

Typical thermal paste recommended is arctic silver, however if you're not OC'ing pretty much anything'll do, just make sure its not lead based.
Jaguar__5
Typical thermal paste recommended is arctic silver, however if you're not OC'ing pretty much anything'll do, just make sure its not lead based.

I plan on buying a CPU upgrade for $30 and if possible overclocking it. I think I'll go with Arctic Silver 5, I hear a LOT of good reviews. I imagine I might need a new heatsink if I overclock though, and I have no idea which ones are best for my motherboard.

Though currently my CPU seems to be running fine without any thermal paste. Do you think it'll work better with?
Areweeffingserious
While we're on the subject, my AMD processor doesn't have any thermal paste applied, and seemingly operates fine. Is there technology that allows my CPU and heat sink to work with each other, should I apply some? Recently I opened an older PC for a good cleaning, and after cleaning the fans heat sink, I discovered white goo on the CPU. I removed the goo to see the manufacturer and GHz. (Intel Pentium 4 2.53GHz)
Anyways, should I not turn this computer back on until I buy and apply some thermal paste? What kind? What brand?
Thermal paste exists in order to fill imperfections in the metal of both the heatspreader of the processor and the base of the heatsink.

Metal is a very good conductor of heat. Air is far less efficient. Imperfections in metal mean that all of the metal of the heatspreader isn't making contact with all of the metal of the heatsink which causes pockets of air. The idea of thermal paste is that it is a solid material that fills the imperfections in the metal in order to improve thermal conductivity (relative to air). Direct metal-metal contact is ideal, but most people are not going to lap or solder their heatsink to their heatspreader.

So is there anything wrong with running without paste? It depends. In some cases you may only see a few degree celsius temperature increase. In other cases you could see much higher increases. It all depends on the design and imperfections of your heatsink and whether your processor can tolerate those increases in temperature. If you want you can boot it into the OS or even just the BIOS and monitor the processor temperature, although the safest route would be to just apply paste. Even the cheapest paste is generally going to be better than none.
Minion4Hire
Areweeffingserious
While we're on the subject, my AMD processor doesn't have any thermal paste applied, and seemingly operates fine. Is there technology that allows my CPU and heat sink to work with each other, should I apply some? Recently I opened an older PC for a good cleaning, and after cleaning the fans heat sink, I discovered white goo on the CPU. I removed the goo to see the manufacturer and GHz. (Intel Pentium 4 2.53GHz)
Anyways, should I not turn this computer back on until I buy and apply some thermal paste? What kind? What brand?
Thermal paste exists in order to fill imperfections in the metal of both the heatspreader of the processor and the base of the heatsink.

Metal is a very good conductor of heat. Air is far less efficient. Imperfections in metal mean that all of the metal of the heatspreader isn't making contact with all of the metal of the heatsink which causes pockets of air. The idea of thermal paste is that it is a solid material that fills the imperfections in the metal in order to improve thermal conductivity (relative to air). Direct metal-metal contact is ideal, but most people are not going to lap or solder their heatsink to their heatspreader.

So is there anything wrong with running without paste? It depends. In some cases you may only see a few degree celsius temperature increase. In other cases you could see much higher increases. It all depends on the design and imperfections of your heatsink and whether your processor can tolerate those increases in temperature. If you want you can boot it into the OS or even just the BIOS and monitor the processor temperature, although the safest route would be to just apply paste. Even the cheapest paste is generally going to be better than none.

I love your responses. You never fail me. Thanks a bunch.

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