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josiv is the answer's avatar

Lunatic

my current one sucks so much i can't make any films on it without it crashing
so im curious what would be a good computer for film making and what might be the best program to use cause windows movie maker is balls.

edit: price range of $500-$600
Echoez's avatar

Moonlight Lover

For that price range I'd go with this Acer. I did a bit of searching, and it's going for around $550-600, but it's on sale for $500 on the Acer site! O: Lucky you.

Anyways, it has a i5-3210M CPU which will be sufficient for video editing in my opinion.
It also comes with a GT 630M dedicated card. If it runs most current games in low-med, it'll run your editing program... is what I'm thinking.

That 4GB of RAM might be a little on the low side however.

If that's the case then you could buy 4 more Gigs for around $30. Here.

Don't know of any video editing programs, so hopefully someone else could help you out.
Happy hunting. ;o
Saruwatari Kooji's avatar

Friendly Phantom

Echoez suggestion on the computer is probably about the best you'll get at that price point. There might be other computers available, but they're all going to be about similar.

As for your video editing options...here is a list of software. Windows Live Movie Maker is probably about the best you'll get for free...anything beyond it's capabilities you will need to pay for, and quite often that software is not cheap.
Acer is certainly within your budget. Remember though - you get what you pay for. I bought an Acer Extensa 5420 for $500-600 and the problems this thing has had over the years builds up. Especially the 5420. Make sure you search up whatever manufacturer you're getting thoroughly to ensure you won't be getting many problems in the long-run.
Saruwatari Kooji
Echoez suggestion on the computer is probably about the best you'll get at that price point. There might be other computers available, but they're all going to be about similar.

As for your video editing options...here is a list of software. Windows Live Movie Maker is probably about the best you'll get for free...anything beyond it's capabilities you will need to pay for, and quite often that software is not cheap.

Don't listen to this guy. Acer is a terrible brand of computers.
Saruwatari Kooji's avatar

Friendly Phantom

Dice Lexic
Acer is certainly within your budget. Remember though - you get what you pay for. I bought an Acer Extensa 5420 for $500-600 and the problems this thing has had over the years builds up. Especially the 5420. Make sure you search up whatever manufacturer you're getting thoroughly to ensure you won't be getting many problems in the long-run.


Acer had a pretty rough start, but their computers are improving. I understand your frustration with your computer, but try not to give the brand as a whole a bad rep because of one bad apple.

At the $500 to $600 price point, there isn't going to be any drastic differences between brands. That's why I stated that among other options, the computers are likely to be very similar.

As I recall, you have a thread for your computer. Give me some time and I'll take another look at it and see what I can do to help you, in the meantime, try to avoid bad mouthing an entire brand over one computer...please.
God Emperor Akhenaton
Saruwatari Kooji
Echoez suggestion on the computer is probably about the best you'll get at that price point. There might be other computers available, but they're all going to be about similar.

As for your video editing options...here is a list of software. Windows Live Movie Maker is probably about the best you'll get for free...anything beyond it's capabilities you will need to pay for, and quite often that software is not cheap.

Don't listen to this guy. Acer is a terrible brand of computers.

Source or stop spouting s**t.
Disconsented
God Emperor Akhenaton
Saruwatari Kooji
Echoez suggestion on the computer is probably about the best you'll get at that price point. There might be other computers available, but they're all going to be about similar.

As for your video editing options...here is a list of software. Windows Live Movie Maker is probably about the best you'll get for free...anything beyond it's capabilities you will need to pay for, and quite often that software is not cheap.

Don't listen to this guy. Acer is a terrible brand of computers.

Source or stop spouting s**t.

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=acer+sucks
God Emperor Akhenaton
Disconsented
God Emperor Akhenaton
Saruwatari Kooji
Echoez suggestion on the computer is probably about the best you'll get at that price point. There might be other computers available, but they're all going to be about similar.

As for your video editing options...here is a list of software. Windows Live Movie Maker is probably about the best you'll get for free...anything beyond it's capabilities you will need to pay for, and quite often that software is not cheap.

Don't listen to this guy. Acer is a terrible brand of computers.

Source or stop spouting s**t.

]http://lmgtfy.com/?q=acer+sucks

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Dell+Sucks
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Hp+Sucks
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Sony+Sucks
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Samsung+Sucks

You notice a general theme here?
You type [itemA] + Bad into Google and it will precisely find that. If these company's were so bad they would have been investigated and been forced to change how they work.

Stop Spouting s**t.
Disconsented
God Emperor Akhenaton
Disconsented
God Emperor Akhenaton
Saruwatari Kooji
Echoez suggestion on the computer is probably about the best you'll get at that price point. There might be other computers available, but they're all going to be about similar.

As for your video editing options...here is a list of software. Windows Live Movie Maker is probably about the best you'll get for free...anything beyond it's capabilities you will need to pay for, and quite often that software is not cheap.

Don't listen to this guy. Acer is a terrible brand of computers.

Source or stop spouting s**t.

]http://lmgtfy.com/?q=acer+sucks

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Dell+Sucks
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Hp+Sucks
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Sony+Sucks
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Samsung+Sucks

You notice a general theme here?
You type [itemA] + Bad into Google and it will precisely find that. If these company's were so bad they would have been investigated and been forced to change how they work.

Stop Spouting s**t.
What a coincidence. I agree with the searches.
Quality control is a lie. If such a thing was regulated, then the dv6000 wouldn't fry itself to death.
unsure about which good editing programs to recommend but you sure need a laptop with sufficient processing power to do video editing, something like the DELL Inspiron 15r-n5110

http://wuggee.com/laptop/dell-inspiron-15r-n5110.html

which comes with a 2.2 GHz Intel Core i7-2670QM and a NVIDIA GeForce GT 525M graphics card. Also comes with 8 GB RAM and a 1 TB hard drive to store all those videos. smile )
Saruwatari Kooji
Dice Lexic
Acer is certainly within your budget. Remember though - you get what you pay for. I bought an Acer Extensa 5420 for $500-600 and the problems this thing has had over the years builds up. Especially the 5420. Make sure you search up whatever manufacturer you're getting thoroughly to ensure you won't be getting many problems in the long-run.


Acer had a pretty rough start, but their computers are improving. I understand your frustration with your computer, but try not to give the brand as a whole a bad rep because of one bad apple.

At the $500 to $600 price point, there isn't going to be any drastic differences between brands. That's why I stated that among other options, the computers are likely to be very similar.

As I recall, you have a thread for your computer. Give me some time and I'll take another look at it and see what I can do to help you, in the meantime, try to avoid bad mouthing an entire brand over one computer...please.


Er... I didn't bad-mouth the brand. I said Acer is within his budget and to make sure to search up the manufacturer first. I'm sure Acer has great devices, just the Extensa 5420 isn't one of them. It's very well-renowned for its problems. I thought it would be helpful to let him know that.
God Emperor Akhenaton
Quality control is a lie. If such a thing was regulated, then the dv6000 wouldn't fry itself to death.
Quality control isn't regulated. Not in the way you're thinking of. The underlying technologies and functions are regulated (by IEEE, FCC, etc) but there isn't some regulated body that is independently testing every computing product from every manufacturer in ways that YOU want them to, such as processor/GPU temperature at idle/load, keyboard ergonomics, relative build quality, etc. Because there is no regulated body, this is why review sites exist. Yes, those sites serve a useful purpose and fill an actual role.

But HP isn't going to clog their heatsink with dust, use an aged, dried out TIM, or use a fan with a failed bearing in their own testing. SOME dv6000-series systems included somewhat higher-end hardware that pushed the limits of the cooling solution that line of chassis provided. When tested, those systems may offer sufficient cooling and performance. In the field, in the hands of users, that's not always the case. There are tons of systems from tons of manufacturers that have failed to deliver sufficient cooling under so called "real-world" scenarios. The only reason that the dv6000-series is even remotely special is because HP used that chassis design for a while and it sold reasonably well. Various dv6000s ran perfectly fine, while others were more likely to run into problems as their tolerances were more limited.

And why are you so focused on the dv6000? It's a chassis design from 6-7 years ago. The only models with consistent issues used power-hungry AMD mobile processors. It's really not worth getting worked up about.
Minion4Hire
God Emperor Akhenaton
Quality control is a lie. If such a thing was regulated, then the dv6000 wouldn't fry itself to death.
Quality control isn't regulated. Not in the way you're thinking of. The underlying technologies and functions are regulated (by IEEE, FCC, etc) but there isn't some regulated body that is independently testing every computing product from every manufacturer in ways that YOU want them to, such as processor/GPU temperature at idle/load, keyboard ergonomics, relative build quality, etc. Because there is no regulated body, this is why review sites exist. Yes, those sites serve a useful purpose and fill an actual role.

But HP isn't going to clog their heatsink with dust, use an aged, dried out TIM, or use a fan with a failed bearing in their own testing. SOME dv6000-series systems included somewhat higher-end hardware that pushed the limits of the cooling solution that line of chassis provided. When tested, those systems may offer sufficient cooling and performance. In the field, in the hands of users, that's not always the case. There are tons of systems from tons of manufacturers that have failed to deliver sufficient cooling under so called "real-world" scenarios. The only reason that the dv6000-series is even remotely special is because HP used that chassis design for a while and it sold reasonably well. Various dv6000s ran perfectly fine, while others were more likely to run into problems as their tolerances were more limited.

And why are you so focused on the dv6000? It's a chassis design from 6-7 years ago. The only models with consistent issues used power-hungry AMD mobile processors. It's really not worth getting worked up about.

Because the dv6000 is a money maker for me. But I do need to correct you on one thing. The issue with the dv6000 is the nVidia GPU. Their processor connects directly to the heatsink with thermal paste, the chipset however is the problem. It isn't directly in contact with the metal on the heatsink. Instead it is "Conducted" with a piece of foam that is too thick to conduct heat properly. So this chip will overheat until eventually it will separate the soldering from the motherboard, getting rid of the video or it will damage the motherboard itself from the heat and kill it.
God Emperor Akhenaton
Minion4Hire
God Emperor Akhenaton
Quality control is a lie. If such a thing was regulated, then the dv6000 wouldn't fry itself to death.
Quality control isn't regulated. Not in the way you're thinking of. The underlying technologies and functions are regulated (by IEEE, FCC, etc) but there isn't some regulated body that is independently testing every computing product from every manufacturer in ways that YOU want them to, such as processor/GPU temperature at idle/load, keyboard ergonomics, relative build quality, etc. Because there is no regulated body, this is why review sites exist. Yes, those sites serve a useful purpose and fill an actual role.

But HP isn't going to clog their heatsink with dust, use an aged, dried out TIM, or use a fan with a failed bearing in their own testing. SOME dv6000-series systems included somewhat higher-end hardware that pushed the limits of the cooling solution that line of chassis provided. When tested, those systems may offer sufficient cooling and performance. In the field, in the hands of users, that's not always the case. There are tons of systems from tons of manufacturers that have failed to deliver sufficient cooling under so called "real-world" scenarios. The only reason that the dv6000-series is even remotely special is because HP used that chassis design for a while and it sold reasonably well. Various dv6000s ran perfectly fine, while others were more likely to run into problems as their tolerances were more limited.

And why are you so focused on the dv6000? It's a chassis design from 6-7 years ago. The only models with consistent issues used power-hungry AMD mobile processors. It's really not worth getting worked up about.

Because the dv6000 is a money maker for me. But I do need to correct you on one thing. The issue with the dv6000 is the nVidia GPU. Their processor connects directly to the heatsink with thermal paste, the chipset however is the problem. It isn't directly in contact with the metal on the heatsink. Instead it is "Conducted" with a piece of foam that is too thick to conduct heat properly. So this chip will overheat until eventually it will separate the soldering from the motherboard, getting rid of the video or it will damage the motherboard itself from the heat and kill it.
Thermal pad. They are thermal pads. Not foam. They're used in lots of laptops.

And again, this is only a problem on systems with higher-end hardware. As you noted, the CPU and GPU/chipset share the heatpipe in use with the heatsink. Intel Core systems are less susceptible to heat issues because they aren't as power hungry and don't produce as much heat as AMD's older mobile chips, which means that the heatpipe is sufficient to cool both the CPU and the GPU/chipset adequately. Lower-end graphics solutions such as GeForce 7050/7150 chipsets are less susceptible than more powerful solutions, and Intel systems less so than AMD.

Otherwise you are correct. But my point is that it's a perfect storm of bullshit that caused this issue. AMD systems with better GPUs that have clogged heatsinks and degraded TIM are going to be far more susceptible to damage than Intel systems with lower end GPUs that are semi-regularly cleaned.

These sorts of design issues can and do occur with every OEM. That's why I'm saying that HP isn't special. Singling out the dv6000 here because it had a well known problem really doesn't prove any point regarding quality control.

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