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Printing, Hosting and Financing for Independent Comikers


Please tell me if there are any missing/broken links. Thanks!

Guys, just a heads up, I didn't make any of this, I just copy and pasted it, however I will be adding more. The original thread is here, thanks to this lovely Gaian who helped us out!
Special Thanks to
Iron Spike
Kyousaka
for your great suggestions
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Differences Between Self Publishing, Publishing with a Company, and Hosting Comics


Self Publishing

Pros
• You can draw and write whatever you want
• All your rights belong to you
• You keep all profits

Cons
• Must be able to finance yourself
• You need to publicize yourself or might need to hire a Literary Agent
• No guarantee in profits/breaking even

Publishing with a Company

Pros
• You will be paid
• Publicity and distribution is handled by a sales team/person
• You're considered to be a part of the comics industry

Cons
• You will be on a schedule
• Changes in story/characters may be requested by editors
• You may be bound to do something you hate
• It's hard to get a publisher to notice you if you're a beginner
• Some of the money will be taken by the company, you will have to sell extra books to make some profit for yourself

Web Hosting

Pros
• Instant publishing through the internet
• Good way to build up a fanbase
• Artistic freedom (see Printing)

Cons
• You will need some knowledge in coding websites
• Lots and lots of competition
• Little chance of substantial monetary gain
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Web Comic Hosting Sites
Links to sites that allow your comics to be viewed by the public by various mediums.


Web Hosting Sites
All hosting sites are free unless stated otherwise.
heart = Hosting with benefits (services, goods and/or money)


Comic Fury
• Relatively simple customization for almost every aspect of a layout
• Easy to get involved in the community
• Option to schedule updates by date and time

Drunk Duck
• Relatively easy coding for customizing
• Uploading in bulk is easy (Shift+Click)
• Banner ads

heart MangaMagazine
• Must complete a submission form to be eligible for hosting
• Mentions of payment via Paypal. Does not specify how payment is determined

Scribd
• Upload download-able PDFs of your work
• Can be shared through Facebook

SmackJeeves
• Allows customization for almost every aspect of a layout
• Option to schedule updates by date and time
• Has one of the largest webcomic communities on the web
• Banner ads for non-members/those not signed in

heart The Rampage Network
• Must complete a submission form to be eligible for hosting
• Free advertising campaigns and website coding services for hosted websites
• Free domain name of your choice ( "mycomic.com" instead of "mycomic.otherdomain.com" )
(link is a bit iffy on this one)

Xepher.Net
• Must complete a submission form to be eligible for hosting
• Website must be built completely from scratch
• Does not specialize in webcomic hosting

Distribution Services

Diamond Comic Distributors Inc.
• THE distributor of comic books.
• Must make $2,500 in gross sales for distribution [x]
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Business (Under Construction)
All sites listed are free unless otherwise noted.
Links with [X] are posts with more information on that product/service.


Promotion/Sales

Consignment:

Conventions: Anime and comic book conventions such as Anime Expo, Comic Con, Alternate Press Expo (APE) can make connections and exchange information about printers and publishers.

Anime Con.com A list of Anime Conventions World Wide.

Internet: Sites where you can connect to your fans and/or share updates about you, your work as well as promote through e-word-of-mouth. Google only searches by text, so keeping a blog will let people be able to stumble upon your comic.
Livejournal - Has option to create a community. Image hosting available with paid subscription
Blogger/Blogspot - Offers free image hosting
WordPress - 50 image limitation for free accounts

Literary Agents: When an agent chooses your project, they fight for it to get published. Agents are paid only when they sell a project.
Literary Agents Who Represent Graphic Novels

Networking:

Legal Documents

U.S. ISBN Agency - To be able to sell your books at retailers (ie: Borders, Amazon, etc), you will need to register for an ISBN.

U.S. Copyright Office - In order to protect your story and characters from possible creative theft, copyright your work here. There is a fee, but it's not very expensive (unless you're buying an individual copyright for every character you create rather than having everything under one copyright)

California Seller's Permit - In order to participate/sell merchandise in the Artist Alley for large conventions in California (Anime Expo, Fanime, Comic Con), you are required to fill out this form for a seller's permit.

Financing

Grants: Foundations that grant money for certain aspects of self-publishing and/or promotion. See individual websites for details.
Xeric Foundation

Fundraising: Sites that provide a means for amassing money for pre-orders and/or donations.
Kickstarter [X] - All-or-nothing fundraiser site.
Paypal - More useful for transactions, but also has a feature for donations.

Bookkeeping

Keep personal funds and comic funds in separate accounts.
Talk to your local banks and find out what options there are for small business accounts.

Keep any receipts of any goods/services you've purchased for comiking for IRS or grant purposes. This includes:
• Hardware (printers, scanners, ink cartridges)
• Art supplies (paper, pens, ink, software, etc)
• Outsourced jobs (inkers, colorists, writers)
• Promotional events/aids (postcards, convention badges, AA table/display fees)

wahmbulance Also of note: If you work from a home office, measure the square footage of the space and determine what percentage of your home it occupies. You can write off that percentage (or more!) off your rent/mortgage, utilities, and insurance. Also, any improvements to that space, like new shelving or a new ceiling fan, are deductible.

Software/Services
• Google Docs - Free online spreadsheet program. Has options for sharing and downloads documents to your computer.
• Microsoft Excel - Industry standard spreadsheet software.
• Quickbooks - Online accounting program. Free 30 day trial.
• Outright.com - USE THIS. Outright links all of your business accounts in one place, automatically updates, keeps track and categorizes both income and expenses for you, and can fill out your tax forms if you shell out for Outright Plus. (Basic Outright is free.) You will weep in relief every April.
Gnucash.org Free accounting program suggested by Kyousaka
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Printers
If you do not follow file specifications of the printer, your job will be delayed, billed extra and/or printed incorrectly.
Printers have the right to refuse service.


A list of common printing terminologies.

User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show. = Confirmed to print adult content
Your local printers
Questions to ask:
• Do you print graphic novels/comic books?
• Do you have a price chart?
• What types of binding do you do?
• What is the minimum page count?
• How much are the margins for bleed?
• Is there a minimum amount of books I have to order?
• What sizes are available?
• Can I see some examples?

NOTE: Minimum Price only for books made with the printer's cheapest options!

360 Digital Books (USA)
Binding: Perfect Bound, Stapled
Minimum Pg. Count: N/A
Minimum Order: 25
Page size(s): 5.5x8.5 (Digest), 8.5x11 (Letter), 6x9, 7x10 (~A5), 9x12, custom sizes
Minimum Price: N/A
Pros: 25 copies of a 7x10 perfect bound, 38 pg book is about $3.50 per book. Offers hardcovers, dust jackets, several selections of paper and coverstock, excellent customer service.
Cons: Turnaround is about ~1-2 weeks or more, though it's possible to receive your books in a little less than two weeks.

Cafe Press (USA-CA)
Binding: Perfect Bound, Wire-O, Stapled
Minimum Pg. Count: N/A
Minimum Order: 0 books
Page size(s): 4.18x6.88 (Mass Market Paperback), 5x8 (Standard Paperback), 6.5x10.25 (Comic), 7.5x9.25 (Technical Manual), 8.5x11 (Letter)
Minimum Price: $0
Pros: Print-on-Demand. Also offers a wide variety of other products.
Cons: If you want to buy your own books in bulk, it's expensive. You also don't get the amount of human interaction you can have with a small press. I found some fan products about the site, but fan comics might be iffy. I've heard their quality is not up to par from one Gaian.

ComiXpress (USA-NJ)
Binding: Stapled, Perfect Bound
Minimum Pg. Count: 4 or 48
Minimum Order: 0 Books
Page size(s): 5x8, 6x9, 8x10.5 and custom sizes.
Minimum Price: $15
Pros: Everything is laid out very well in the website, from calculating costs to printing the comic. Offers distribution from online store.
Cons: Slow in general


User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show. CreateSpace (USA)
Binding:
Minimum Pg. Count:
Minimum Order: 0 Books
Page size(s): 5x8, 6x9, 8x10.5 and custom sizes.
Minimum Price: $0
Pros: Offers distribution from online store and Amazon.com.
Cons: Extra charge for buying through Amazon on creator's side.

Indigo Ink (USA)
Binding: Stapled, Perfect Bound
Minimum Pg. Count:
Minimum Order:
Page size(s): 5x8, 6x9, 8x10.5 and custom sizes.
Minimum Price: $
Pros:
Cons:

Ka-Blam (USA)
Binding: Stapled
Minimum Pg. Count:
Minimum Order:
Page size(s):
Minimum Price:
Pros: Offers several options to cut down on printing costs.
Cons:

Keness (USA-CA)
Binding: Stapled,
Minimum Pg. Count: 8 or 32
Minimum Order: 100
Page size(s): 5.5x8.5 (Digest), 5.25x8, 8.5x11 (Letter), 8.25x10
Minimum Price: $65.42
Pros:
Cons:

Lightning Source (USA)
Binding:
Minimum Pg. Count:
Minimum Order:
Page size(s): 4.25x11, 5.5x8.5 (Digest), 7x8.5, 6x9, 8.5x11 (Letter), 8.5x14(Legal), 6.5x10.25 (Comic), 11x17 (Tabloid)
Minimum Price: $
Pros: Print-on-Demand.
Cons:

Lulu.com (USA-NC)
Binding: Perfect Bound, Spiral Bound, Stapled
Minimum Pg. Count: N/A
Minimum Order: 0 books
Page size(s): 6x9 (Approx. Digest), 8.5x11 (Letter), 6.5x10.25 (Comic)
Minimum Price: $0
Pros: Print-on-Demand. Also heard that the quality of the books are very good.
Cons: If you want to buy your own books in bulk, it's expensive. You also don't get the amount of human interaction you can have with a small press. Fan comics might be iffy for publishing.

Moxi Copy (USA)
Binding: Stapled, Spiral Bound
Minimum Pg. Count: 4
Minimum Order: N/A
Page size(s): 4.25x11, 5.5x8.5 (Digest), 7x8.5, 6x9, 8.5x11 (Letter), 8.5x14(Legal), 6.5x10.25 (Comic), 11x17 (Tabloid)
Minimum Price: $0.08 (not including shipping)
Pros: Very, very VERY cheap. Quite a few paper options. Print quality is OK for the price.
Cons: If you don't send in your files as a PDF, you'll take a pretty big hit on image quality. Also, the bleed margin is HUGE (twice the size of the average bleed margin)

User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show. Patterson Printing (USA)
Binding: Stapled, Perfect Bound,
Minimum Pg. Count: N/A
Minimum Order: 1
Page size(s): 4.25x7, 5.5x8.5 (Digest), 6x9, 8.5x11 (Letter), 6.5x10.25 (Comic), 11x17 (Tabloid), custom sizes
Minimum Price: N/A
Pros: Color covers available in CMYK + custom Pantone inks (up to 5)
Cons: B/W interiors only + 1 custom Pantone ink

User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show. Side Kick Printing (USA)
Binding: Stapled, Perfect Bound, Wire-O, Comb
Minimum Pg. Count: 2
Minimum Order: N/A
Page size(s): 9x12, 6.625x10.25 (Comic), 8.5x11 (Letter), 4.25x7, 5.5x8.5 (Digest), 6x9, custom sizes
Minimum Price: N/A
Pros: Offers dust jackets and hardcovers, 10% off order over $500, same day turnaround, responsive customer service.
Cons: Need to upload files over 100 MB on separate FTP or other file upload service.


Filler Blach Blach Balcjhsdhfjdsf.
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Articles of Interest


Printing
May 20, 2009 Working in Harmony - The legal side of a printer's right to refuse service on religious grounds
April 3, 2007 Brenner Says No to Adult Comics - Trends in printers refusing to print adult material
~June 2009 Print On Demand Service Review

Publishing
wahmbulance The Submission Guidelines for every Comic and Manga Publisher in the Universe wahmbulance
(Date N/A) Dark Horse: Portfolio 101 - A guide of how to present your portfolio at conventions.
Nov 8, 2010 Literary Agents Who Represent Graphic Novels
Nov 4, 2010 Manga is not a dirty word…
Aug 25, 2010 When a Japanese Artist's Art Isn't Japanese Enough (link is missing, looking for new link)
May 26, 2008 Tokyopop Manga Pilot Pact Signs Away Legal Rights

Distribution
Nov 13. 2010 Ghetto Manga Monthly's Samax Amen on Distribution
Jun 29, 2010 Life After Diamond
Jun 16, 2006 Consignment is a Con

Announcements,News, Updates


Major Update. Links fixed. Websites checked,. Printers section re-added. Links will be checked soon. 7.25.2013
Kyousouka's avatar

Shadowy Phantom

In the Articles of Interest section, the "Aug 25, 2010 When a Japanese Artist's Art Isn't Japanese Enough" link is broken. I searched the site for the article and could not find it ):

Will you be around to maintain this thread? Fanartist maintained the old one for several years! Takes quite a commitment.

(Gah I hope I'm not posting too early.)
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I will be around. I log in everyday.. i love the art community here smile
Kyousouka's avatar

Shadowy Phantom

That's good to hear. Are you going to go through and fix/remove the broken links? The list is rather short, I think you could handle it yourself xP
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Shadowy Phantom

I think the last two links (both comparing webcomic hosts) should be removed. They're years out of date, and are no longer accurate or useful.
As you already noted, some of these links are outdated and no longer useful. But I also feel some of these statements could use some elaboration.

Commentary is in red.
Additions are in purple.

ForgettenPencil
Differences Between Printing, Publishing, and Hosting Comics

Printing (aka: self-publishing) "Printing" and "self-publishing" are not interchangeable. "Printing" is the actual physical production of a book, handled by a contractor. "Self-publishing" is the process which requires printing, and markets the results of printing after the job is done.

Pros
• You can draw and write whatever you want
• All your rights are belong to you This is worth more than you probably realize.
• You keep all profits

Cons
• Must be able to finance yourself
• You need to publicize yourself or hire a Literary Agent A literary agent is something the vast majority of independent cartoonists, particularly those who self-publish, won't have to worry about. Agents find you work with other entities; a self-publisher is primarily interested in working for themselves, with the occasional freelance job for the sake of novelty or prestige.
• No guarantee in profits/breaking even This can also be the case with a publisher.
• Administration, pre-press, order fulfillment and customer service requirements may overwhelm an unprepared creator.
• A minimum level of financial and business competence, or at least the means to access someone with that level of competence, is required. You'll have to keep track of inventory, sales, expenses, etc., and eventually pay taxes.


Publishing
Pros
• You will be paid Unless you're working for "exposure." Hint: Don't do that. And don't agree to postponing payment to "on the back-end," or when the book makes a profit, unless you are ONE HUNDRED PERCENT SURE that will happen.
• Publicity and distribution is handled by a sales team/person Maybe. Maybe not. How much publicity your publisher provides for your work is dependent on multiple factors, from how strongly your editor believes in your book, to how famous you are, to the time of the year, to what movie genres are currently most popular. The belief that a publish will handle all publicity for you is largely a myth.
• You're considered to be a part of the comics industry Self-publishers are considered part of the comics industry.

Cons
• You will be on a schedule Yes and no. You'll have a deadline. What that means will depend on the publisher and the kind of work you're doing.
• Changes in story/characters may be requested by editors You mean will be.
• You may be bound to do something you hate Again, yes and no. Most contract work has an escape clause. But you should know before you even begin whether or not the project is going to work for you. And if you ignore your doubts and drop the project later down the line, your reputation will suffer, and you may even have a monetary obligation to your employer.
• It's hard to get a publisher to notice you if you're a beginner
• At a minimum, you will lose distribution rights to your work for a specified period of time. At worst, you'll lose your property rights.
• A significant portion of your potential income will be absorbed by your publisher, requiring you to sell far more books to make a living wage. A good publisher will do their best to make this happen. A bad one won't.

Web Hosting Most publishers have an online presence, now, and most self-publishers start out online. not sure why this is still categorized as a third option; it's not truly independent of either of the others. A successful webcomics author will eventually find themselves aligned with freelance or self-published work, or possibly both..
Pros
• Instant publishing through the internet
• Good way to build up a fanbase
• Artistic freedom (see Printing)

Cons
• You will need some knowledge in coding websites
• Lots and lots of competition
• Little chance of substantial monetary gain True. But this is uniformly true for all modes of comics. Comics isn't a wealthy industry; self published cartoonists and freelancers alike will start with low pay.
More stuff to say.

Commentary in red.

ForgettenPencil
Distribution
Links to sites that allow your comics to be viewed by the public by various mediums.


Strictly speaking, "distribution" in comics industry langage is interpreted as "Means by which I get my comic into stores." Not "How I publish my comic online." Most people will look at you cockeyed if you describe Drunk Duck or SmackJeeves as your distributor.

And unless it's absolutely, positively out of the question, unless you're stone broke, unless there is literally no other way, do what you can to get your own hosting. Buy a domain name, install WordPress, choose a Wordpress webcomic plug-in (ComicPress or Webcomic), and maintain your own site, particularly if you aspire to create in a professional capacity.

Personally speaking, if I were a teenager looking to post my comics online in 2013 and knew I could never talk my parents into buying me a domain or hosting, I'd put my comics on tumblr before resorting to any comics-specific hosting services. Most look, and feel, obsolete.


Web Hosting Sites
All hosting sites are free unless stated otherwise.
heart = Hosting with benefits (services, goods and/or money)


Comic Fury
• Relatively simple customization for almost every aspect of a layout
• Easy to get involved in the community
• Option to schedule updates by date and time

Drunk Duck
• Relatively easy coding for customizing
• Uploading in bulk is easy (Shift+Click)
• Banner ads

heart MangaMagazine
• Must complete a submission form to be eligible for hosting
• Mentions of payment via Paypal. Does not specify how payment is determined

Scribd
• Upload download-able PDFs of your work
• Can be shared through Facebook

SmackJeeves
• Allows customization for almost every aspect of a layout
• Option to schedule updates by date and time
• Has one of the largest webcomic communities on the web
• Banner ads for non-members/those not signed in

heart The Rampage Network
• Must complete a submission form to be eligible for hosting
• Free advertising campaigns and website coding services for hosted websites
• Free domain name of your choice ( "mycomic.com" instead of "mycomic.otherdomain.com" )
(link is a bit iffy on this one)

heart Wirepop
• Must complete a submission form to be eligible for hosting
• You receive a percentage of the profit the website makes. No percentage specified
• Looks primarily for Asian styles, but other styles accepted

CLOSED

Xepher.Net
• Must complete a submission form to be eligible for hosting
• Website must be built completely from scratch
• Does not specialize in webcomic hosting

Distribution Services

Diamond Comic Distributors Inc.
• THE distributor of comic books. Yes. Diamond is a functional monopoly. Rejection from Diamond's catalog, Previews, makes it very difficult to get into comic shops. However, comic shop distribution is not strictly necessary to make a living wage.
• Must make $6,000 in gross sales for distribution Wait, what? No.

The minimum order requirement for Diamond is $2500. This means the gross value of the number of copies ordered for that book must reach $2500, retail. (So, for example, a $25.00 book must receive a minimum of 125 nationwide orders.) However, in 2010, Diamond changed their policy, and pledged to fill initial orders of books they offered in Previews, even if it did NOT meet the minimum order requirement.

What this means to creators is that Diamond's representatives will not let books into Previews that they do not believe will gross $2500. The catalog has gatekeepers that will judge your book on quality, price, and potential for popularity, and make their decision from there. If a book falls short on orders, it will be distributed regardless. But good luck getting anything related to that book, like a sequel or second issue, in Previews ever again.
You know the deal.

Commentary in red.
Additions in purple.

ForgettenPencil
Business (Under Construction)
All sites listed are free unless otherwise noted.
Links with [X] are posts with more information on that product/service.


Promotion/Sales

Consignment: I honestly don't know of anyone who still sells on consignment other than Last Gasp.

Conventions: Anime and comic book conventions such as Anime Expo, Comic Con, Alternate Press Expo (APE) can make connections and exchange information about printers and publishers. Do not discount the importance of conventions. Go make friends; you'll be glad you did.

Internet: Sites where you can connect to your fans and/or share updates about you, your work as well as promote through e-word-of-mouth. Google only searches by text, so keeping a blog will let people be able to stumble upon your comic.
Livejournal - Has option to create a community. Image hosting available with paid subscription I don't think I have to tell you guys no one cares about Livejournal, anymore. it couldn't hurt to get a Twitter or a tumblr, though.
Blogger/Blogspot - Offers free image hosting
WordPress - 50 image limitation for free accounts

Literary Agents: When an agent chooses your project, they fight for it to get published. Agents are paid only when they sell a project.
Literary Agents Who Represent Graphic Novels If you're ever in a position where you actually need a literary agent, one will be easy to find. That's because it's likely you're either wildly successful, have been around for years and know everyone, or both.

Jump off this bridge when you come to it. You won't need an agent for years, if ever.


Networking: Don't be a d**k. Comics is too small a pond, and if enough people don't like you, you'll feel it in ways you'll never expect, or never even be made aware of.

Best example I can think of? Perfectly competent, responsible mainstream inker, who suddenly found himself suddenly unemployable after a homophobic tirade of a comics message board.


Legal Documents

U.S. ISBN Agency - To be able to sell your books at retailers (ie: Borders, Amazon, etc), you will need to register for an ISBN.

U.S. Copyright Office - In order to protect your story and characters from possible creative theft, copyright your work here. There is a fee, but it's not very expensive (unless you're buying an individual copyright for every character you create rather than having everything under one copyright) This is unnecessary. All creative work is automatically copyrighted at the moment of creation; you're not required to register it. The only reason to formally register with the Copyright Office is to establish that copyright in the public record. Registered work "may be eligible for statutory damages and attorney's fees in successful litigation." And, if registration "occurs within 5 years of publication, it is considered prima facie evidence in a court of law."

Translation: If you have to sue someone for breaching your copyright, registration will make it easier to win.


Official registration of a copyright should be saved for profitable or potentially-profitable works. If it comes to a courtroom showdown, you won't be entitled to any damages unless you can demonstrate the violated copyright in question actually makes you money, or made the other guy money.


California Seller's Permit - In order to participate/sell merchandise in the Artist Alley for large conventions in California (Anime Expo, Fanime, Comic Con), you are required to fill out this form for a seller's permit. Many other states, such as Arizona, are beginning to require permits as well. The con should tell you if the state its held in will want a cut of your sales. Do not blow this off.

Financing

Grants: Foundations that grant money for certain aspects of self-publishing and/or promotion. See individual websites for details.
Xeric Foundation Defunct. Xeric discontinued comic book self-publishing grants in 2012, and now strictly gives to nonprofit and charitable organizations.

Fundraising: Sites that provide a means for amassing money for pre-orders and/or donations.
Kickstarter [X] - All-or-nothing fundraiser site. And the best goddamn thing since penicillin. Figure this site out, and you can literally secure your career.
Paypal - More useful for transactions, but also has a feature for donations. It's not advisable to use Paypal for pre-order projects. Their EULA contains an arbitrarily-enforced clause guaranteeing delivery of a purchased item to a buyer within a certain number of days after the transaction; if you miss your deadline and a single buyer complains, Paypal can, and will, freeze your account. More than one cartoonist has actually been banned from Paypal for using it to organize pre-order drives.

For this reason, I also don't recommend using Indiegogo, which pays out to Paypal.


Bookkeeping

Keep personal funds and comic funds in separate accounts. You will want to kill yourself every April if you do not have a dedicated business checking account.

Talk to your local banks and find out what options there are for small business accounts.

Keep any receipts of any goods/services you've purchased for comiking for IRS or grant purposes. This includes:
• Hardware (printers, scanners, ink cartridges)
• Art supplies (paper, pens, ink, software, etc)
• Outsourced jobs (inkers, colorists, writers) You'll want to get W9s from all American or US-based contract workers, and send in 1099s for them at tax time.
• Promotional events/aids (postcards, convention badges, AA table/display fees)

Also of note: If you work from a home office, measure the square footage of the space and determine what percentage of your home it occupies. You can write off that percentage (or more!) off your rent/mortgage, utilities, and insurance. Also, any improvements to that space, like new shelving or a new ceiling fan, are deductible.

And write off all your comic book purchases. Research. They can't prove it's not.


Software/Services
• Google Docs - Free online spreadsheet program. Has options for sharing and downloads documents to your computer.
• Microsoft Excel - Industry standard spreadsheet software.
• Quickbooks - Online accounting program. Free 30 day trial.
• Outright.com - USE THIS. Outright links all of your business accounts in one place, automatically updates, keeps track and categorizes both income and expenses for you, and can fill out your tax forms if you shell out for Outright Plus. (Basic Outright is free.) You will weep in relief every April.
Kyousouka's avatar

Shadowy Phantom

IronSpike
Stuff to say.

And here I thought you'd given up on us :'D

I do want to challenge a couple of things you said about hosting webcomics though:


I think the absolute ideal situation is to have your own host+domain name, yes, but I think WP is the second best option. WP is a resource hog, filled with a million features you'll never use on a comic site. The perfect-world case is to write your own comic management script that fits your specific needs (bonus effect: it's probably going to have fewer security holes than WP). If we're going to talk of ideals, then I think it's best to mention that possibility. WP+(comic add-on of choice) is the go-to solution for people unable/unwilling to write their own thing, though it's still far from non-coder-friendly when it comes to customisation.


I personally find SmackJeeves is still a viable comic host, especially if you pay the $19/year to remove ads. The comic management features are good, and the amount of customisation is quite impressive, especially for a system that's very simple. It still absolutely pales in comparison to self-hosting in terms of potential control and features, but I think it's a good starting place for people who aren't yet sure if they're willing to make the leap into making comics as a major part of their life.



Also, I didn't even notice the Software/Services section before.
OP: Add GnuCash. It's a free accounting program, similar to Quickbooks and MS Money. I use this for all my finances.

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