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Hi guys i'm looking to work for a comic company (not for money) just for experience. Even an unpaid internship if its possible. The problem is, i only have a level 3 diploma in art design from (college, high school) i didn't go through university because i haven't had enough money to attend since i became kinda homeless and live on my sisters couch now lol. I love drawing a lot, i been drawing and painting since i was a little girl...and i kinda wanna make it a profession...And i really got into drawing comic characters lately, and really wanna go into that sort of field...(yes i know its tough and not as glamorous as it may seem!) but i just wanna gain unpaid experience from a company for now just to learn more skills. I live in London btw, i know most comic companies are american...Does any 1 have any clue to where i could start off? And is it necessary for me to have a degree? xx


Oh and heres a view of my art btw

http://siaraantonios.tumblr.com/
celestrialdarkmoon's avatar

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I'm not really sure how companies in Europe are compared to American companies. What I know, applies to American companies, but will hopefully help you as well.

For one; don't undersell your self. If you can make some money and make a career of it, do it.

Two, try looking around at various small (even non-comics) companies that could use art as paid contract work. Doing some work for these companies can beef up a good resume and shows the comic companies that you have a level of professional experience under you.

Go to conventions or other likes and let the companies know you exist and are very interested in the field. Also, take the time to meet writers and artists in the field., Build up your contacts with everyone in the field. If you have questions, many artists are willing to speak with you if you message them via a polite e-mail. They know the field the best.

Keep up your portfolio. Most companies don't want to see old work. Keep the work fresh (now, if there is one or two peices that are just fantastic and older, that's okay as long as a large majority of the portfolio is fresh and new. These pieces can also act as boosts of memory for people who had seen your work before. They'll be like, "Oh yeah, I remember this piece." ) Along the lines of portfolio building, keep your work varying. Have character designs, illustrations, and various short stories or scenes. Show how you handle a talking scene and how you handle an action scene. Show your pencils, inks and colors. (Or if you just want to focus on one of these; have that in your portfolio. Many profession level artists who have DA accounts often post up high-res files of their work for other people to practice on. Just remember to credit the artist, and if you post it online credit their work and let them know. They love seeing how other people handle inks over their pencils, or colors of their inks.)

Start a web comic. Webcomics are becoming more and more popular (there are many sites: comicfury, smackjeeves, tapastic, and mangamagazine to name a few). Many companies want to see their prospective artists having a webcomic because it can tell them a lot about the person. It can show how you handle story, plot development, character development, pacing, scene changes, in general time management handling, and other general stuff that they would need to know. remember, companies are making an investment in you, so they want to be sure that they can make it back.


I wouldn't say you would need a degree, but those who get a specialty degree I feel have a slight leg up on most people because their schools do help them build their contections and point out and help get rid of bad habits and weak points quicker as opposed to some one self teaching themself. But, you can always get other people to give you critiques and help you through the rough patches.


I hope this helps you at least some.
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Something to keep in mind - comic companies always will prefer published artists, regardles of diploma. Lucky for us, webcomics are easy way to publish.
Marianne Von Rosen
Something to keep in mind - comic companies always will prefer published artists, regardles of diploma. Lucky for us, webcomics are easy way to publish.


I just looked up webcomics...that is a really awesome idea! thanks for informing me about this xx
celestrialdarkmoon
I'm not really sure how companies in Europe are compared to American companies. What I know, applies to American companies, but will hopefully help you as well.

For one; don't undersell your self. If you can make some money and make a career of it, do it.

Two, try looking around at various small (even non-comics) companies that could use art as paid contract work. Doing some work for these companies can beef up a good resume and shows the comic companies that you have a level of professional experience under you.

Go to conventions or other likes and let the companies know you exist and are very interested in the field. Also, take the time to meet writers and artists in the field., Build up your contacts with everyone in the field. If you have questions, many artists are willing to speak with you if you message them via a polite e-mail. They know the field the best.

Keep up your portfolio. Most companies don't want to see old work. Keep the work fresh (now, if there is one or two peices that are just fantastic and older, that's okay as long as a large majority of the portfolio is fresh and new. These pieces can also act as boosts of memory for people who had seen your work before. They'll be like, "Oh yeah, I remember this piece." ) Along the lines of portfolio building, keep your work varying. Have character designs, illustrations, and various short stories or scenes. Show how you handle a talking scene and how you handle an action scene. Show your pencils, inks and colors. (Or if you just want to focus on one of these; have that in your portfolio. Many profession level artists who have DA accounts often post up high-res files of their work for other people to practice on. Just remember to credit the artist, and if you post it online credit their work and let them know. They love seeing how other people handle inks over their pencils, or colors of their inks.)

Start a web comic. Webcomics are becoming more and more popular (there are many sites: comicfury, smackjeeves, tapastic, and mangamagazine to name a few). Many companies want to see their prospective artists having a webcomic because it can tell them a lot about the person. It can show how you handle story, plot development, character development, pacing, scene changes, in general time management handling, and other general stuff that they would need to know. remember, companies are making an investment in you, so they want to be sure that they can make it back.


I wouldn't say you would need a degree, but those who get a specialty degree I feel have a slight leg up on most people because their schools do help them build their contections and point out and help get rid of bad habits and weak points quicker as opposed to some one self teaching themself. But, you can always get other people to give you critiques and help you through the rough patches.


I hope this helps you at least some.


this is very useful thank u very much hun x
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Cherri en rose
this is very useful thank u very much hun x


No problem. Good luck.
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Marianne Von Rosen
Something to keep in mind - comic companies always will prefer published artists, regardles of diploma. Lucky for us, webcomics are easy way to publish.


I don't think webcomics count as "publishing". There's no requirement and no filtering. If a cartoonist tries to publish through us, we prefer physical copies of books and hardly even look at webcomics submissions.
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you have potential, a very promising one. You should start with a full profolio of a complete set of character design arts from head to toe, male and female. after that, just send it off to companies.
well thanks for the information guys, I'm sure i will find somewhere...

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