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So... I gots the page to be colored. XD


Yay! *confetti*


This forum needs moar people. I wish I could see some of the wor that has already been done by thes Catalytic Productions. sad
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Jiigoku
This forum needs moar people. I wish I could see some of the wor that has already been done by thes Catalytic Productions. sad


Heheh, yeah our stuff is kind of scattered across the internet. I'm working on putting more stuff like character bios up on our website, but I'm not great at coding and the Wordpress add-on we've been using to display comic pages has also broken. sweatdrop

But I can collect some stuff together for you to look at xD We have a couple of mini comics, [x] [x] and a Photobucket which has the inked pages from our first project Domino Disaster! (one of which you will recognise from your colouring test razz ) and character designs from a few of our projects. Here are some pencils from Checkmate, a comic about chess pieces come to life. Altogether we have about six projects being worked on, three long comics and three short ones, plus a whole load of miscellaneous one-shot 'gag strips'.
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This forum needs moar people. I wish I could see some of the wor that has already been done by thes Catalytic Productions. sad


Heheh, yeah our stuff is kind of scattered across the internet. I'm working on putting more stuff like character bios up on our website, but I'm not great at coding and the Wordpress add-on we've been using to display comic pages has also broken. sweatdrop

But I can collect some stuff together for you to look at xD We have a couple of mini comics, [x] [x] and a Photobucket which has the inked pages from our first project Domino Disaster! (one of which you will recognise from your colouring test razz ) and character designs from a few of our projects. Here are some pencils from Checkmate, a comic about chess pieces come to life. Altogether we have about six projects being worked on, three long comics and three short ones, plus a whole load of miscellaneous one-shot 'gag strips'.


How long have people been working on them? (If its not too much to ask)
I belive the date on the original thread was 2007?
O_O
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Jiigoku
How long have people been working on them? (If its not too much to ask)
I belive the date on the original thread was 2007?
O_O


Well picked up. xD Yes, technically our comic studio has been around for more than 5 years, but in that long history is a lot of flailing around and general cluelessness. First of all, the studio was founded by someone else, not myself. It never really became clear what she had planned for the studio because she never did anything much with it before disappearing a few months after it was set up. (We later found out that she'd been hacked, but she also had another account the whole time that she could have used to post in the thread, only she didn't). I was nominated to take over what was left of the studio, by virtue of being the bossiest. xD Problem was, I had no idea how to run a comic studio, and neither did anyone else who was a member at that time. xD So then we had a long process of trying to figure out exactly what makes up comics and how they work, and bearing in mind that we were also all in our mid-teens at the time. I was 15 when I took over the studio, lol. It always bodes well when you have a 15-year-old in charge of a project.

The history of the studio has basically been one of immense trial and error, and it's taken us until now to get to a good system of making comics. I mean, we're still improving it. The other big thing that's slowed us down is people going inactive and abandoning the studio. That's why we have 12 pages of Domino Disaster! drawn by one artist and three by another, and why the first two pages are screentoned but none of the rest are. It's why Lola and Butterfly's Delight, among others, have never made it to the pencilling stage. Unfortunately (and with a few notable exceptions), Gaia is not exactly a haven for finding serious, dedicated comic artists and we've only started to make decent progress with the studio since we began to expand outside Gaia in the last year or so.

As for the timeline of our projects, Domino Disaster! is almost as old as the studio itself. Trapped Inside a Novel, our second long-term project, also dates to around 2008. But as you'll see from what I wrote above, timelines can be deceiving. Our other projects are more recent. I'd give you a run-down of when and how they were all started except that I've already written a wall of text, so... if you still want to know, I'll put it in the next post. xD
Yay for being a notable exception~
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How long have people been working on them? (If its not too much to ask)
I belive the date on the original thread was 2007?
O_O


Well picked up. xD Yes, technically our comic studio has been around for more than 5 years, but in that long history is a lot of flailing around and general cluelessness. First of all, the studio was founded by someone else, not myself. It never really became clear what she had planned for the studio because she never did anything much with it before disappearing a few months after it was set up. (We later found out that she'd been hacked, but she also had another account the whole time that she could have used to post in the thread, only she didn't). I was nominated to take over what was left of the studio, by virtue of being the bossiest. xD Problem was, I had no idea how to run a comic studio, and neither did anyone else who was a member at that time. xD So then we had a long process of trying to figure out exactly what makes up comics and how they work, and bearing in mind that we were also all in our mid-teens at the time. I was 15 when I took over the studio, lol. It always bodes well when you have a 15-year-old in charge of a project.

The history of the studio has basically been one of immense trial and error, and it's taken us until now to get to a good system of making comics. I mean, we're still improving it. The other big thing that's slowed us down is people going inactive and abandoning the studio. That's why we have 12 pages of Domino Disaster! drawn by one artist and three by another, and why the first two pages are screentoned but none of the rest are. It's why Lola and Butterfly's Delight, among others, have never made it to the pencilling stage. Unfortunately (and with a few notable exceptions), Gaia is not exactly a haven for finding serious, dedicated comic artists and we've only started to make decent progress with the studio since we began to expand outside Gaia in the last year or so.

As for the timeline of our projects, Domino Disaster! is almost as old as the studio itself. Trapped Inside a Novel, our second long-term project, also dates to around 2008. But as you'll see from what I wrote above, timelines can be deceiving. Our other projects are more recent. I'd give you a run-down of when and how they were all started except that I've already written a wall of text, so... if you still want to know, I'll put it in the next post. xD


After hearing that, I'm just amazing everyone stuck to the project! eek
That's cool though, such determination!

So how many people have left since it started? (I know I'm just being nosy at this point. sweatdrop )

I was also wondering if I could give some helpful hints I've learned form comic artists (my teachers) in class. I had one teacher who worked for Tokyopop, another from Marvel, and one who worked mainly with Dark Horse.
(I hope I'm not crossing a line here.)
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Jiigoku
After hearing that, I'm just amazing everyone stuck to the project! eek
That's cool though, such determination!

So how many people have left since it started? (I know I'm just being nosy at this point. sweatdrop )

I was also wondering if I could give some helpful hints I've learned form comic artists (my teachers) in class. I had one teacher who worked for Tokyopop, another from Marvel, and one who worked mainly with Dark Horse.
(I hope I'm not crossing a line here.)


Haha, thanks very much :3 I really think we have the potential to do awesome things, stuff that's different to what most people are currently doing, and although the idea of an internet-based studio comes with a lot of downsides, what we could achieve outweighs all of that.

I wish I could give you an actual body count for people who've dropped out of the studio, but over five years... the number is ridiculous, and I've never bothered to try and count it xD It also depends whether you want to count people who've applied but never managed to turn in the application test, or just those who were admitted to the studio and then disappeared. But perhaps the best example of our extremely high turnover rate is the fact that of our 13 current members, 3 have been members since 2007 (including me and Emi here), one has been a member since 2008, and the rest all joined in the last 6-8 months. Also we only have 13 members. Even though we've been around for 5 years. X3

(Actually, 13 members is great going for us. We rarely make it into the double digits. At its lowest point the studio was down to just 3 active members. whee )

Suggestions are always welcomed! It's fine, we like anyone who is interested and willing to contribute stuff of their own accord, whether or not they're an official member :3
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After hearing that, I'm just amazing everyone stuck to the project! eek
That's cool though, such determination!

So how many people have left since it started? (I know I'm just being nosy at this point. sweatdrop )

I was also wondering if I could give some helpful hints I've learned form comic artists (my teachers) in class. I had one teacher who worked for Tokyopop, another from Marvel, and one who worked mainly with Dark Horse.
(I hope I'm not crossing a line here.)


Haha, thanks very much :3 I really think we have the potential to do awesome things, stuff that's different to what most people are currently doing, and although the idea of an internet-based studio comes with a lot of downsides, what we could achieve outweighs all of that.

I wish I could give you an actual body count for people who've dropped out of the studio, but over five years... the number is ridiculous, and I've never bothered to try and count it xD It also depends whether you want to count people who've applied but never managed to turn in the application test, or just those who were admitted to the studio and then disappeared. But perhaps the best example of our extremely high turnover rate is the fact that of our 13 current members, 3 have been members since 2007 (including me and Emi here), one has been a member since 2008, and the rest all joined in the last 6-8 months. Also we only have 13 members. Even though we've been around for 5 years. X3

(Actually, 13 members is great going for us. We rarely make it into the double digits. At its lowest point the studio was down to just 3 active members. whee )

Suggestions are always welcomed! It's fine, we like anyone who is interested and willing to contribute stuff of their own accord, whether or not they're an official member :3


The comics you will be doing are going to be mainly internet based right? similar to a webcomic?

If it is, the working size for the images doesn't have to be large, it just has to be print-size.
A basic 72 dpi will also be easier, mainly because the internet used 72ppi resolution. 3nodding
150 dpi is what would be highter-quality for internet viewing. whee
Since the images will be smaller, it will make everything go a lot quicker. User Image
Even when working in digital media to be printed later, you'd work at the printing size, just with 300 or more ppi. 4laugh

Make sure all colors used are within the printable spectrum of color; unless only going digital.

I hope I don't sound to bossy or know-it-all; I just think you guys have a great base of operations all ready set up, and you guys should really succeed. whee
Jiigoku

The comics you will be doing are going to be mainly internet based right? similar to a webcomic?

If it is, the working size for the images doesn't have to be large, it just has to be print-size.
A basic 72 dpi will also be easier, mainly because the internet used 72ppi resolution. 3nodding
150 dpi is what would be highter-quality for internet viewing. whee
Since the images will be smaller, it will make everything go a lot quicker. User Image
Even when working in digital media to be printed later, you'd work at the printing size, just with 300 or more ppi. 4laugh

Make sure all colors used are within the printable spectrum of color; unless only going digital.

I hope I don't sound to bossy or know-it-all; I just think you guys have a great base of operations all ready set up, and you guys should really succeed. whee
I actually find it easier to draw in a really high resolution then just scale down. Yeah, web only sees 72dpi, but print shops start at like 300 dpi and the higher you go, the higher quality it is. I think it just takes a bit of practice to speed things up at high resolutions, because it's not like you're going to be working at 100% zoom all the time. At like 400dpi, I can easily add details and not flail trying to draw in a face of a background character.

For comparison these two pages were done by me, and you can tell which one looks better:
150dpi:
User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show.

300dpi:
User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show.
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Jiigoku

The comics you will be doing are going to be mainly internet based right? similar to a webcomic?

If it is, the working size for the images doesn't have to be large, it just has to be print-size.
A basic 72 dpi will also be easier, mainly because the internet used 72ppi resolution. 3nodding
150 dpi is what would be highter-quality for internet viewing. whee
Since the images will be smaller, it will make everything go a lot quicker. User Image
Even when working in digital media to be printed later, you'd work at the printing size, just with 300 or more ppi. 4laugh

Make sure all colors used are within the printable spectrum of color; unless only going digital.

I hope I don't sound to bossy or know-it-all; I just think you guys have a great base of operations all ready set up, and you guys should really succeed. whee
I actually find it easier to draw in a really high resolution then just scale down. Yeah, web only sees 72dpi, but print shops start at like 300 dpi and the higher you go, the higher quality it is. I think it just takes a bit of practice to speed things up at high resolutions, because it's not like you're going to be working at 100% zoom all the time. At like 400dpi, I can easily add details and not flail trying to draw in a face of a background character.

For comparison these two pages were done by me, and you can tell which one looks better:
150dpi:
User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show.

300dpi:
User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show.


I have never found it difficult working at 150ppi.
I know printers start at 300dpi, but it's only to get the best quality in the printing process.
Scaling down does produce a good image, but depending on the artist (especially those those who love to do the smallest details) there would be wasted time trying to draw the small parts that are lost when scaling occurs. sad
All of my drawings (except the "suggestive" one) were all done at 150ppi. 4laugh
I would also like to ask the time difference between these two images one seems to be a lot older that the other. sweatdrop

Don't get me wrong, some artists do like to work at the larger size then scale down; there is no wrong way or right way to do things, and you can learn to be quick at higher resolutions. (I believe my teacher Mara is one of them, she loves drawing the small details)
I was giving suggestions based on the people who have taught me and have worked in the industry. 3nodding
Since you guys are just starting out, I thought it would be okay to help.
If you don't plan on printing the piece for distribution, I would suggest a lower resolution.
The average comic artist should be able to to pencil 2 pages every day. and Inker also has to do the same. Colorists normally get one to two weeks (if they're lucky) to color and entire 22-26 page comic. (this is what I was expected to produce).

There are exceptions to this, some artists are so awesome that they're willing to wait for them, other times something need to be changed, pushing back the deadline. 3nodding

Web comics on the other hand, can do anywhere from 1 page every 2-days to 1 week. Sometimes even 1 page a month. Others will just wait to post an entire chapter at once, taking a month to several months to finish. sad

It all depends on style. Style is what's important, and whatever works for you. I'm just trying to be helpful. User Image
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Jiigoku
I would also like to ask the time difference between these two images one seems to be a lot older that the other. sweatdrop


They were actually done by different artists - when Emi said that she "did" them both she was referring to inking and not drawing. Though I think the second one was also inked more recently.

You're right that we're not planning to print our comics, at least not for a good while. The interwebs will be our medium with which we conquer the world!

Help is always appreciated ^^ Looking at these few posts, all I can say is that I'm glad there are people around who know about this sort of thing, because I haven't a blinking clue xD
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I would also like to ask the time difference between these two images one seems to be a lot older that the other. sweatdrop


They were actually done by different artists - when Emi said that she "did" them both she was referring to inking and not drawing. Though I think the second one was also inked more recently.

You're right that we're not planning to print our comics, at least not for a good while. The interwebs will be our medium with which we conquer the world!

Help is always appreciated ^^ Looking at these few posts, all I can say is that I'm glad there are people around who know about this sort of thing, because I haven't a blinking clue xD


Lol. Not a lot of people do, that's why my teacher wanted to start a comics teaching program at out school, so there would be more comic artists ready for work. The classes are new, however, so the curriculum was changing a lot. (it was changed from a certificate to an associates between semesters) eek (luckily I was studying art for 3 1/2 years beforehand so I didn't have to worry about the core classes)

But the purpose of the program was to get the students ready for the comic industry as soon as they finish. 3nodding
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Jiigoku
Lol. Not a lot of people do, that's why my teacher wanted to start a comics teaching program at out school, so there would be more comic artists ready for work. The classes are new, however, so the curriculum was changing a lot. (it was changed from a certificate to an associates between semesters) eek (luckily I was studying art for 3 1/2 years beforehand so I didn't have to worry about the core classes)

But the purpose of the program was to get the students ready for the comic industry as soon as they finish. 3nodding


Cool! That sounds like a pretty rare program. A lot of people still don't take comics seriously as an art form or bother to explore its potential. I wouldn't have got so heavily into comics if I hadn't accidentally wound up head of a comics studio xD But I love the medium (especially after reading Scott McCloud's excellent works) and I write mostly for comics now. Ideas tend to take shape in my head as comics rather than novels or short stories like they used to. Not everything works well as a comic of course, but some ideas can become a lot more interesting when you start to tell them visually.

I would really like to study comics writing properly, but I don't know if are classes for that sort of thing, let alone in this country. (America gets all the good art and comics courses). So for now I'm reading what books I can find on the subject and learning through experience/trial and error. My favourite method. X3

How did you get into comics, if you don't mind my asking? :3
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Lol. Not a lot of people do, that's why my teacher wanted to start a comics teaching program at out school, so there would be more comic artists ready for work. The classes are new, however, so the curriculum was changing a lot. (it was changed from a certificate to an associates between semesters) eek (luckily I was studying art for 3 1/2 years beforehand so I didn't have to worry about the core classes)

But the purpose of the program was to get the students ready for the comic industry as soon as they finish. 3nodding


Cool! That sounds like a pretty rare program. A lot of people still don't take comics seriously as an art form or bother to explore its potential. I wouldn't have got so heavily into comics if I hadn't accidentally wound up head of a comics studio xD But I love the medium (especially after reading Scott McCloud's excellent works) and I write mostly for comics now. Ideas tend to take shape in my head as comics rather than novels or short stories like they used to. Not everything works well as a comic of course, but some ideas can become a lot more interesting when you start to tell them visually.

I would really like to study comics writing properly, but I don't know if are classes for that sort of thing, let alone in this country. (America gets all the good art and comics courses). So for now I'm reading what books I can find on the subject and learning through experience/trial and error. My favourite method. X3

How did you get into comics, if you don't mind my asking? :3


My brother had always been a collector of comics. Mostly I love the characters in the comics and their story lines. I collect a little, but My brother collects seriously. In high school I drew some sequential strips about characters I had made (mostly animals). I lost the drive to make comics as I got older, as it was hard to explain the characters behind the stories I was creating, and most of my friends weren't interested in art or comics (mostly just drugs).

In college I found out from a friend that there was a comic's program, and I decided to pursue it. It is an amazing course. I'm just lucky enough to be at one of the colleges in the country that have the program.

There are some comics that come with a sample script in it, if you are able to get a hold of them, I would suggest buying some. I know I bought Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth (15th Anniversary Ed.) has the entire script printed on the back by Grant Morrison.

There are many ways to write comic scripts. Some people write like a play, others like a novel or short story. And others write as though it's an RP in a chat room. For writing, all that matters is that you get your point and vision across.

The Arkham Azylum book is amazing, done by one of my more favorite aritst Dave McKean (who did a lot of covers for the Sandman Series). I also love Neil Gaiman. XD
Oooh, nice! Though, I'm not that big a Morisson fan myself. He does some really weird stuff with batman, some good some not. Gaiman's good, though I've read more of his novels than I have comics (I really do need to reread Sandman one day).

I'm really jealous of that comic program though. *____* The art program at my school sucks too hard, but then again, I don't go to an art school or anything remotely close.

Heh, I feel like we've tried all the ways you mentioned for writing scripts.

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