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Slaughter In The Vatican's avatar

Prophet

Pooty God
Blue Cheer?
We've had this discussion a million times here, so I'm not sure what the quality of this thread will be.

And I'm not sure if you are referring to the first metal band, or just the first group (band/musician) to scare people/Satan.
Slaughter In The Vatican's avatar

Prophet

tim is a portal
We've had this discussion a million times here, so I'm not sure what the quality of this thread will be.

And I'm not sure if you are referring to the first metal band, or just the first group (band/musician) to scare people/Satan.
I mean the music. The music that scared the common people, made them feel uneasy and depressed.

People thought KISS were a Satan kind of band just 'cause of their make up, but they're Hard Rock.
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Ursine Guildsman

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The first full on Metal band(in my opinion) is Black Sabbath. Now, bands like Blue Cheer and Iron Butterfly certainly had songs that came out before the song "Black Sabbath", and those songs could be considered Metal. But Sabbath is hands down the first Metal band.
Slaughter In The Vatican
tim is a portal
We've had this discussion a million times here, so I'm not sure what the quality of this thread will be.

And I'm not sure if you are referring to the first metal band, or just the first group (band/musician) to scare people/Satan.
I mean the music. The music that scared the common people, made them feel uneasy and depressed.

People thought KISS were a Satan kind of band just 'cause of their make up, but they're Hard Rock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritone#Historical_uses
The name diabolus in musica ("the Devil in music".) has been applied to the interval from at least the early 18th century. Johann Joseph Fux cites the phrase in his seminal 1725 work Gradus ad Parnassum, Georg Philipp Telemann in 1733 notes, "mi against fa", which the ancients called "Satan in music", and Johann Mattheson in 1739 writes that the "older singers with solmization called this pleasant interval 'mi contra fa' or 'the devil in music'".[15] Although the latter two of these authors cite the association with the devil as from the past, there are no known citations of this term from the Middle Ages, as is commonly asserted.[16] However Denis Arnold, in the The New Oxford Companion to Music, suggests that the nickname was already applied early in the medieval music itself:
It seems first to have been designated as a "dangerous" interval when Guido of Arezzo developed his system of hexachords and with the introduction of B flat as a diatonic note, at much the same time acquiring its nickname of "Diabolus in Musica" ("the devil in music".).[17]


There are probably definitely older cases.
Onani Master Luna Thoth's avatar

Hygienic Humorist

First actual example of metal: Black Sabbath 1969.

Proto-Metal includes: Blue Cheer, Cream, Deep Purple, and Sir Lord Baltimore.
TABLEWRECKER's avatar

Fashionable Cat

tim is a portal
Slaughter In The Vatican
tim is a portal
We've had this discussion a million times here, so I'm not sure what the quality of this thread will be.

And I'm not sure if you are referring to the first metal band, or just the first group (band/musician) to scare people/Satan.
I mean the music. The music that scared the common people, made them feel uneasy and depressed.

People thought KISS were a Satan kind of band just 'cause of their make up, but they're Hard Rock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritone#Historical_uses
The name diabolus in musica ("the Devil in music".) has been applied to the interval from at least the early 18th century. Johann Joseph Fux cites the phrase in his seminal 1725 work Gradus ad Parnassum, Georg Philipp Telemann in 1733 notes, "mi against fa", which the ancients called "Satan in music", and Johann Mattheson in 1739 writes that the "older singers with solmization called this pleasant interval 'mi contra fa' or 'the devil in music'".[15] Although the latter two of these authors cite the association with the devil as from the past, there are no known citations of this term from the Middle Ages, as is commonly asserted.[16] However Denis Arnold, in the The New Oxford Companion to Music, suggests that the nickname was already applied early in the medieval music itself:
It seems first to have been designated as a "dangerous" interval when Guido of Arezzo developed his system of hexachords and with the introduction of B flat as a diatonic note, at much the same time acquiring its nickname of "Diabolus in Musica" ("the devil in music".).[17]


There are probably definitely older cases.
you talkin bout tritones there? nvm saw the quotation. tritones are boss

also i remember hearing something about how pieces that were in minor keys were required to end on a major chord
that's so bullshit rofl
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tim is a portal
Slaughter In The Vatican
tim is a portal
We've had this discussion a million times here, so I'm not sure what the quality of this thread will be.

And I'm not sure if you are referring to the first metal band, or just the first group (band/musician) to scare people/Satan.
I mean the music. The music that scared the common people, made them feel uneasy and depressed.

People thought KISS were a Satan kind of band just 'cause of their make up, but they're Hard Rock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritone#Historical_uses
The name diabolus in musica ("the Devil in music".) has been applied to the interval from at least the early 18th century. Johann Joseph Fux cites the phrase in his seminal 1725 work Gradus ad Parnassum, Georg Philipp Telemann in 1733 notes, "mi against fa", which the ancients called "Satan in music", and Johann Mattheson in 1739 writes that the "older singers with solmization called this pleasant interval 'mi contra fa' or 'the devil in music'".[15] Although the latter two of these authors cite the association with the devil as from the past, there are no known citations of this term from the Middle Ages, as is commonly asserted.[16] However Denis Arnold, in the The New Oxford Companion to Music, suggests that the nickname was already applied early in the medieval music itself:
It seems first to have been designated as a "dangerous" interval when Guido of Arezzo developed his system of hexachords and with the introduction of B flat as a diatonic note, at much the same time acquiring its nickname of "Diabolus in Musica" ("the devil in music".).[17]


There are probably definitely older cases.
you talkin bout tritones there? nvm saw the quotation. tritones are boss

also i remember hearing something about how pieces that were in minor keys were required to end on a major chord
that's so bullshit rofl
dudes is whack
Onani Master Luna Thoth's avatar

Hygienic Humorist

Ur evil music has to end happy, because only stories with happy endings are allowed, or we will burn you at the stake.
Slaughter In The Vatican's avatar

Prophet

tim is a portal
Slaughter In The Vatican
tim is a portal
We've had this discussion a million times here, so I'm not sure what the quality of this thread will be.

And I'm not sure if you are referring to the first metal band, or just the first group (band/musician) to scare people/Satan.
I mean the music. The music that scared the common people, made them feel uneasy and depressed.

People thought KISS were a Satan kind of band just 'cause of their make up, but they're Hard Rock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritone#Historical_uses
The name diabolus in musica ("the Devil in music".) has been applied to the interval from at least the early 18th century. Johann Joseph Fux cites the phrase in his seminal 1725 work Gradus ad Parnassum, Georg Philipp Telemann in 1733 notes, "mi against fa", which the ancients called "Satan in music", and Johann Mattheson in 1739 writes that the "older singers with solmization called this pleasant interval 'mi contra fa' or 'the devil in music'".[15] Although the latter two of these authors cite the association with the devil as from the past, there are no known citations of this term from the Middle Ages, as is commonly asserted.[16] However Denis Arnold, in the The New Oxford Companion to Music, suggests that the nickname was already applied early in the medieval music itself:
It seems first to have been designated as a "dangerous" interval when Guido of Arezzo developed his system of hexachords and with the introduction of B flat as a diatonic note, at much the same time acquiring its nickname of "Diabolus in Musica" ("the devil in music".).[17]


There are probably definitely older cases.
I'm talking about bands.
Slaughter In The Vatican's avatar

Prophet

Luna Thoth
First actual example of metal: Black Sabbath 1969.

Proto-Metal includes: Blue Cheer, Cream, Deep Purple, and Sir Lord Baltimore.
Don't forget Budgie
Amanda Gaider's avatar

Shirtless Seeker

Slaughter In The Vatican
tim is a portal
We've had this discussion a million times here, so I'm not sure what the quality of this thread will be.

And I'm not sure if you are referring to the first metal band, or just the first group (band/musician) to scare people/Satan.
I mean the music. The music that scared the common people, made them feel uneasy and depressed.

People thought KISS were a Satan kind of band just 'cause of their make up, but they're Hard Rock.

Not really.
They got that reputation for several reasons.
The entire word is capitalized. This lead people to believe that it was an acronym for something. With the last two letters in the logo resembling the Nazi SS insignia, people thought that whatever the letters stood for must be something dark and sinister. Rumors quickly spread that "KISS" stood for "Knights In Satan's Service". What with Gene's armor and legendary axe-shaped bass, as well as the band's excessive use of pyrotechnics, this fit extremely well. The whole "blood dripping from Gene's freakish tongue" thing helped things along. In an interview, he even stated that he wondered what human flesh tastes like. Plenty of religious types would ask him whether or not he was a devil-worshipper, and he never gave an answer, for publicity reasons. It's better publicity to let them wonder.

Not to mention the whole "loud = dangerous = Satan" thing that's been going on since rock and roll first came to be.
Slaughter In The Vatican
tim is a portal
Slaughter In The Vatican
tim is a portal
We've had this discussion a million times here, so I'm not sure what the quality of this thread will be.

And I'm not sure if you are referring to the first metal band, or just the first group (band/musician) to scare people/Satan.
I mean the music. The music that scared the common people, made them feel uneasy and depressed.

People thought KISS were a Satan kind of band just 'cause of their make up, but they're Hard Rock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritone#Historical_uses
The name diabolus in musica ("the Devil in music".) has been applied to the interval from at least the early 18th century. Johann Joseph Fux cites the phrase in his seminal 1725 work Gradus ad Parnassum, Georg Philipp Telemann in 1733 notes, "mi against fa", which the ancients called "Satan in music", and Johann Mattheson in 1739 writes that the "older singers with solmization called this pleasant interval 'mi contra fa' or 'the devil in music'".[15] Although the latter two of these authors cite the association with the devil as from the past, there are no known citations of this term from the Middle Ages, as is commonly asserted.[16] However Denis Arnold, in the The New Oxford Companion to Music, suggests that the nickname was already applied early in the medieval music itself:
It seems first to have been designated as a "dangerous" interval when Guido of Arezzo developed his system of hexachords and with the introduction of B flat as a diatonic note, at much the same time acquiring its nickname of "Diabolus in Musica" ("the devil in music".).[17]


There are probably definitely older cases.
I'm talking about bands.
Well, I mean, if you really want...

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