Welcome to Gaia! ::

Do you receive food stamps?

Yes 0.21428571428571 21.4% [ 3 ]
No, but I have before 0.14285714285714 14.3% [ 2 ]
No, and I've never received them 0.64285714285714 64.3% [ 9 ]
Total Votes:[ 14 ]
1
MisdreavusPrincess's avatar

Timid Vampire

9,750 Points
  • Conversationalist 100
  • Invisibility 100
  • Streaker 200
So how many of my fellow Gaians receive SNAP benefits?

Personally, I do, and I'm not ashamed to admit it.
I'm a college student and one day when I'm making enough money to fend for myself, my tax dollars will pay the state back.
Do I feel entitled to food of my choice? Yes.
I have a right to eat what I want. Try to dismantle it what you will, conservatives, but you won't change my view.

For everyone else receiving benefits, you might have noticed or heard that the benefits are changing to a different day starting this month.

I used to receive my stamps on the 7th and my husband the 8th, but now we will both be receiving them on the 14th, instead.
Needless to say, the government is not giving anyone who is having to wait an extra week or two for their benefits this month any extra on their SNAP balance.

In the state of TN, this has resulted many stories like the following:

Quote:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - The date Tennesseans who take part in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program get their payments changed on October 1st.

The Tennessee Department of Human Services revised what days payments are dispersed at the request of Tennessee Grocers and Convenience Store Association.

"And they've been asking this for several years for some relief just because the amount of benefits we're issuing each month and the time of month those benefits are issued and spent by the recipients," said SNAP director Richard Dobbs.

Previously payments were spread out over a ten day period. The revised schedule extends that to a 20 day period so fewer people are shopping during the first two weeks of the month.

The changes affect 95% of SNAP's 1.3 million recipients in Tennessee.

Tennessee paid out $30 million a month for this program 15 years ago. Today SNAP costs the state $180 million a month.

Recipients were made aware of the October change in August. Local food banks also prepared for an increase in people who might need assistance.

Many of the shelves were empty at St. Luke's Community House in West Nashville Monday afternoon.

"We had an incredibly high demand in anticipation of the weekend and, I think in part, in anticipation of the benefits change over date," said Chris Sanders with St. Luke's.

Even with the advance notice of the plan's changes many people will still have a difficult time filling the gap between he first of the month and their new pay date.

"Absolutely for a family who's really trying to stretch their dollars ands survive for that week, especially when they have small children," said Sanders.

DHS said they did receive an increased number of calls Monday from recipients inquiring about the changes.


Source

What do you guys think?
KoperKat's avatar

Vicious Darling

11,450 Points
  • Survivor 150
  • Jolly Roger 50
  • Cheercrusher 50
Nope, since I'm not a citizen of US.

However as an unemployed regularly (meaning continuously out of high school) enrolled student and a citizen of my country I have the following benefits courtesy of my government:
- public universities are free (includes all the libraries, but not books or some other indivdual equipment) and considered by far the best in the country, criteria for getting in are state tests, grades, competition and research achievements - you get points for each and a computer system ranks the candidates
- free universal health coverage (including dental, hospitalization, helicopter ride if ill or injured in hard to reach region (mountaineering is the national past time), specialist consultation, doctor visits, some vaccinations, ... and much more)
- food benefits (you get as many bons as there are workdays in the month for each you can get a subsidized meal in the approved restaurants (the government pays 2,62€ you pay the rest - up to 4,60€ - which depends on how fancy the restaurant is) and you get a three course meal. McDonalds is around 1€ and you get a burger of choice, small fries, small salad, 3dcl drink and a fruit/pie/small icecream, for 3 something you get a decent pizza with salad, drins and soup, for 4,50 and two hour wait you can go to a fancy asian fusion restaurant near the pairlament.
- cheaper public transportation - I get a monthly pass from home town for 30€ if I want it plus a free city card.
- If you want, you can chose to live in dormitories (which are state run and pretty cheap) or rent privately.
- can get irregular work without paying taxes as long as you don't get over either the hourly or monetary limit (over that you're considered regularly employed, studying no longer the priority and you loose benefits)
This applies to ALL regardless of income.

Poorer students, students with disabilities and student moms get more (free or cheaper lodgings in dormitories, more bons per month, no need to pay for bus passes). And state scholarships. These are pretty common, since you get it if you fall below the 85% of average income per family member. Or if you're talented, in this case income doesn't matter).
I have one of this (actually I've had one, the approvals for this year aren7t out yet, but I'm confident I'll get it). However if, you don't finish your schooling you have to return it in full.

Downside? The income tax in this country is on average around 45%.
But people are generally fine with it, since in exchange you get free schooling (except some doctorates), universal health coverage (including payed sick days and 10 months off for a newborn - 3 months of sick leave for the mother, the rest is for the baby and the parent can divide the off time however they want to), social transfers if you fall on hard times, child benefits and a pension once you've been working for 40 years - these include pregnancy time and volunteering for the military service (or have been unfortunate to become and invalid unable to work).

I think it's a good trade.

EDIT: What a wall of text. O_O
Btw I don't understand what is the USA's problem with social transfers and universal health care is... all the other developed countries have it and it works well.
MisdreavusPrincess's avatar

Timid Vampire

9,750 Points
  • Conversationalist 100
  • Invisibility 100
  • Streaker 200
KoperKat
Nope, since I'm not a citizen of US.

However as an unemployed regularly (meaning continuously out of high school) enrolled student and a citizen of my country I have the following benefits courtesy of my government:
- public universities are free (includes all the libraries, but not books or some other indivdual equipment) and considered by far the best in the country, criteria for getting in are state tests, grades, competition and research achievements - you get points for each and a computer system ranks the candidates
- free universal health coverage (including dental, hospitalization, helicopter ride if ill or injured in hard to reach region (mountaineering is the national past time), specialist consultation, doctor visits, some vaccinations, ... and much more)
- food benefits (you get as many bons as there are workdays in the month for each you can get a subsidized meal in the approved restaurants (the government pays 2,62€ you pay the rest - up to 4,60€ - which depends on how fancy the restaurant is) and you get a three course meal. McDonalds is around 1€ and you get a burger of choice, small fries, small salad, 3dcl drink and a fruit/pie/small icecream, for 3 something you get a decent pizza with salad, drins and soup, for 4,50 and two hour wait you can go to a fancy asian fusion restaurant near the pairlament.
- cheaper public transportation - I get a monthly pass from home town for 30€ if I want it plus a free city card.
- If you want, you can chose to live in dormitories (which are state run and pretty cheap) or rent privately.
- can get irregular work without paying taxes as long as you don't get over either the hourly or monetary limit (over that you're considered regularly employed, studying no longer the priority and you loose benefits)
This applies to ALL regardless of income.

Poorer students, students with disabilities and student moms get more (free or cheaper lodgings in dormitories, more bons per month, no need to pay for bus passes). And state scholarships. These are pretty common, since you get it if you fall below the 85% of average income per family member. Or if you're talented, in this case income doesn't matter).
I have one of this (actually I've had one, the approvals for this year aren7t out yet, but I'm confident I'll get it). However if, you don't finish your schooling you have to return it in full.

Downside? The income tax in this country is on average around 45%.
But people are generally fine with it, since in exchange you get free schooling (except some doctorates), universal health coverage (including payed sick days and 10 months off for a newborn - 3 months of sick leave for the mother, the rest is for the baby and the parent can divide the off time however they want to), social transfers if you fall on hard times, child benefits and a pension once you've been working for 40 years - these include pregnancy time and volunteering for the military service (or have been unfortunate to become and invalid unable to work).

I think it's a good trade.

EDIT: What a wall of text. O_O
Btw I don't understand what is the USA's problem with social transfers and universal health care is... all the other developed countries have it and it works well.


I wish we had that here.

The US acts like Socialism is a bad thing, when we'd be much better with it.

All I can say is that I envy you! razz

What country do you live in?
I have a friend in Australia and he's told me similar traits of his government.
psychoprincess16's avatar

Lonely Gaian

5,750 Points
  • Loiterer 100
  • Ultimate Player 200
  • Big Tipper 100
MisdreavusPrincess's avatar

Timid Vampire

9,750 Points
  • Conversationalist 100
  • Invisibility 100
  • Streaker 200
psychoprincess16
No.


Uhm...no what?
psychoprincess16's avatar

Lonely Gaian

5,750 Points
  • Loiterer 100
  • Ultimate Player 200
  • Big Tipper 100
MisdreavusPrincess
psychoprincess16
No.


Uhm...no what?


I'm not on food stamps...

Quick Reply

Submit
Manage Your Items
Other Stuff
Get Items
Get Gaia Cash
Where Everyone Hangs Out
Other Community Areas
Virtual Spaces
Fun Stuff
Gaia's Games