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Our router keeps dropping the wifi, and only the wifi. Watching Netflix on my secksbawx in the living room has become unbearable.
Sonic Offline
Our router keeps dropping the wifi, and only the wifi. Watching Netflix on my secksbawx in the living room has become unbearable.
Replace it.

I don't know what it is, but I've seen dozens of routers just have their radios simply die. No software problems, no other issues, they're perfectly serviceable routers, but the radio simply dies.
Sonic Offline's avatar

Dedicated Man-Lover

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psychic stalker
Sonic Offline
Our router keeps dropping the wifi, and only the wifi. Watching Netflix on my secksbawx in the living room has become unbearable.
Replace it.

I don't know what it is, but I've seen dozens of routers just have their radios simply die. No software problems, no other issues, they're perfectly serviceable routers, but the radio simply dies.
That's the plan when we can afford it.
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Man-Hungry Prophet

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Watching two dicks duke it out is quite amusing.

Not trying to sound dirty...
Your random youtube comment for the day.

"i wonder if that stuff gets in my butthole..."
3 days ago by SketchyPadz and 46 thumbs up.
Would getting a flu shot while you have the flu cure it?
Or would it cause some sort of microbial WW3 inside me?

also,
User Image - Blocked by "Display Image" Settings. Click to show.

Apparently solvemedia <3 time lords.
nouveau sereph's avatar

Shameless Enabler

The flu shot is just a very small dose of the ACTUAL flu designed to help your body build up antibodies for when the disease is super prevalent. Because the flu mutates every year, you have to get a shot every year to make new antibodies for the new variant.

So no, it wouldn't do you much good at all.

Unrelated: Got an iPhone 5.
Slutty_Eddie's avatar

Newbie Noob

Rgoodermote
Slutty_Eddie

All of these were here long before the Chatterbox was ever made.
Quite a few forums there.
IIRC, and we're talking a long time ago...

Lanzer opened the forums with one forum only, just to test things out. He closed the site for six months and then reopened it. I believe I lurked for a while, although I didn't join during this period. Or that I did join, but I lost my password after waiting 6 months.

That one forum was the chatterbox, I believe.
Slutty_Eddie's avatar

Newbie Noob

Sen Natsu
Would getting a flu shot while you have the flu cure it?
Or would it cause some sort of microbial WW3 inside me?
The flu shot trains your body to fight the flu with dead or inactive flu germs. It gives you a faster reaction time when the "real flu" comes, so you might be able to fight it off before it makes you sick.

If you take a flu shot while sick, your body has to respond to the new invaders, diverting resources from it's current fight. It would cause your body to be a microbial Germany fighting a war on two fronts in WW2.
birdman3131
The20
I'll put it that way: if an exterior wall (you said something about windows) isn't strong enough to support a TV smashing that other TV is the least of your problems.
Lets do some math. Standard stud distance (center to center) is usually either 16" or 24". We will go with 16" because it gives us a higher chance. A 2x4 stud is 1.5" wide. Disregarding the fact that you cant hit the edge and get much support that leaves us a 1.5/16 chance of actually hitting a stud with a screw/nail. that comes out to a 9.375% chance. That goes down to a 6.25% chance if they have 24" stud placement. The chance of winning on the average scratch off lotto ticket around here is 1 in 5 to 1 in 3.5 (or 20% to 28.5% ) which means he has a higher chance of winning the lotto than blindly hitting a stud.
What are your walls made of? I'm used to see exterior walls that are made of half a meter of bolder, concrete or, at the very least, cavity bricks.

(Bringing this to WIHL, since off topic and all ...)
The20
birdman3131
The20
I'll put it that way: if an exterior wall (you said something about windows) isn't strong enough to support a TV smashing that other TV is the least of your problems.
Lets do some math. Standard stud distance (center to center) is usually either 16" or 24". We will go with 16" because it gives us a higher chance. A 2x4 stud is 1.5" wide. Disregarding the fact that you cant hit the edge and get much support that leaves us a 1.5/16 chance of actually hitting a stud with a screw/nail. that comes out to a 9.375% chance. That goes down to a 6.25% chance if they have 24" stud placement. The chance of winning on the average scratch off lotto ticket around here is 1 in 5 to 1 in 3.5 (or 20% to 28.5% ) which means he has a higher chance of winning the lotto than blindly hitting a stud.
What are your walls made of? I'm used to see exterior walls that are made of half a meter of bolder, concrete or, at the very least, cavity bricks.

(Bringing this to WIHL, since off topic and all ...)
Most construction in the US is 2x6 or 2x8 wood frame exterior walls with 1/2" drywall (~1.2cm thick sheet of plaster or chalk, rarely cement) on the interior. Stud spacing on such a frame is typically 16-24" for a load-bearing wall. Framing for interior walls in typically 2x4 or 2x6 wood frames with 24-32" spacing for non-load-bearing and 16-24" for load-bearing walls. The exact measurements sometimes depend on local building codes.

2x4 wood for framing is cut approximately 5cm by 8cm, and comes in lengths of between 61cm and 3.65 meters, in 61cm increments. 2x6 wood is cut 5cm by ~12cm, and 2x8 is 5cm by ~16cm. (The 2x4, 2x6, and 2x8 measurements don't really seem to be based on any actual units.)

2x6 or 2x8 is used for exterior walls to make room for fiberglass insulation. 2x4 interior walls generally have little or no insulation and exist only as fire barriers and for a house's layout.

"Studs" are the vertical beams in the frame that add structural support and load-bearing strength. Drywall is usually made of a material that cannot ignite.
psychic stalker
The20
birdman3131
The20
I'll put it that way: if an exterior wall (you said something about windows) isn't strong enough to support a TV smashing that other TV is the least of your problems.
Lets do some math. Standard stud distance (center to center) is usually either 16" or 24". We will go with 16" because it gives us a higher chance. A 2x4 stud is 1.5" wide. Disregarding the fact that you cant hit the edge and get much support that leaves us a 1.5/16 chance of actually hitting a stud with a screw/nail. that comes out to a 9.375% chance. That goes down to a 6.25% chance if they have 24" stud placement. The chance of winning on the average scratch off lotto ticket around here is 1 in 5 to 1 in 3.5 (or 20% to 28.5% ) which means he has a higher chance of winning the lotto than blindly hitting a stud.
What are your walls made of? I'm used to see exterior walls that are made of half a meter of bolder, concrete or, at the very least, cavity bricks.

(Bringing this to WIHL, since off topic and all ...)
Most construction in the US is 2x6 or 2x8 wood frame exterior walls with 1/2" drywall (~1.2cm thick sheet of plaster or chalk, rarely cement) on the interior. Stud spacing on such a frame is typically 16-24" for a load-bearing wall. Framing for interior walls in typically 2x4 or 2x6 wood frames with 24-32" spacing for non-load-bearing and 16-24" for load-bearing walls. The exact measurements sometimes depend on local building codes.

2x4 wood for framing is cut approximately 5cm by 8cm, and comes in lengths of between 61cm and 3.65 meters, in 61cm increments. 2x6 wood is cut 5cm by ~12cm, and 2x8 is 5cm by ~16cm. (The 2x4, 2x6, and 2x8 measurements don't really seem to be based on any actual units.)

2x6 or 2x8 is used for exterior walls to make room for fiberglass insulation. 2x4 interior walls generally have little or no insulation and exist only as fire barriers and for a house's layout.

"Studs" are the vertical beams in the frame that add structural support and load-bearing strength. Drywall is usually made of a material that cannot ignite.
Correct me if i'm wrong, but that sounds like me and a big hammer could cause enough structural damage to a house to bring it down.

Is this an accurate depiction of the frame? -> http://mjwrightconstruction.com/images/framing.jpg

Edit: Come to think of it, if you cover the whole thing in 1'' chip board it shouldn't be that easy to bring down.
The20
psychic stalker
The20
birdman3131
The20
I'll put it that way: if an exterior wall (you said something about windows) isn't strong enough to support a TV smashing that other TV is the least of your problems.
Lets do some math. Standard stud distance (center to center) is usually either 16" or 24". We will go with 16" because it gives us a higher chance. A 2x4 stud is 1.5" wide. Disregarding the fact that you cant hit the edge and get much support that leaves us a 1.5/16 chance of actually hitting a stud with a screw/nail. that comes out to a 9.375% chance. That goes down to a 6.25% chance if they have 24" stud placement. The chance of winning on the average scratch off lotto ticket around here is 1 in 5 to 1 in 3.5 (or 20% to 28.5% ) which means he has a higher chance of winning the lotto than blindly hitting a stud.
What are your walls made of? I'm used to see exterior walls that are made of half a meter of bolder, concrete or, at the very least, cavity bricks.

(Bringing this to WIHL, since off topic and all ...)
Most construction in the US is 2x6 or 2x8 wood frame exterior walls with 1/2" drywall (~1.2cm thick sheet of plaster or chalk, rarely cement) on the interior. Stud spacing on such a frame is typically 16-24" for a load-bearing wall. Framing for interior walls in typically 2x4 or 2x6 wood frames with 24-32" spacing for non-load-bearing and 16-24" for load-bearing walls. The exact measurements sometimes depend on local building codes.

2x4 wood for framing is cut approximately 5cm by 8cm, and comes in lengths of between 61cm and 3.65 meters, in 61cm increments. 2x6 wood is cut 5cm by ~12cm, and 2x8 is 5cm by ~16cm. (The 2x4, 2x6, and 2x8 measurements don't really seem to be based on any actual units.)

2x6 or 2x8 is used for exterior walls to make room for fiberglass insulation. 2x4 interior walls generally have little or no insulation and exist only as fire barriers and for a house's layout.

"Studs" are the vertical beams in the frame that add structural support and load-bearing strength. Drywall is usually made of a material that cannot ignite.
Correct me if i'm wrong, but that sounds like me and a big hammer could cause enough structural damage to a house to bring it down.

Is this an accurate depiction of the frame? -> http://mjwrightconstruction.com/images/framing.jpg

Edit: Come to think of it, if you cover the whole thing in 1'' chip board it shouldn't be that easy to bring down.
Yes. That's typical housing construction, before exterior facing and interior sheeting are applied.

We don't use chipboard (we call it particleboard) in this part of construction. OSB (oriented-strand-board) and plywood is more typical for exterior facing (and often flooring) that goes underneath roofing materials and siding, but it's never nearly as thick as 1" in typical residential construction. 1/2" is more typical, and occasionally you'll see 3/4". I've never seen 1" on a construction project.
psychic stalker
Yes. That's typical housing construction, before exterior facing and interior sheeting are applied.

We don't use chipboard (we call it particleboard) in this part of construction. OSB (oriented-strand-board) and plywood is more typical for exterior facing (and often flooring) that goes underneath roofing materials and siding, but it's never nearly as thick as 1" in typical residential construction. 1/2" is more typical, and occasionally you'll see 3/4". I've never seen 1" on a construction project.
The number was just a wild guess (i wanted something simple).
Anyways, all of that burns pretty well, no? Now i know that most people don't actively try to burn down their house, but what is done to prevent all this from becoming a big bonfire?
The20
psychic stalker
Yes. That's typical housing construction, before exterior facing and interior sheeting are applied.

We don't use chipboard (we call it particleboard) in this part of construction. OSB (oriented-strand-board) and plywood is more typical for exterior facing (and often flooring) that goes underneath roofing materials and siding, but it's never nearly as thick as 1" in typical residential construction. 1/2" is more typical, and occasionally you'll see 3/4". I've never seen 1" on a construction project.
The number was just a wild guess (i wanted something simple).
Anyways, all of that burns pretty well, no? Now i know that most people don't actively try to burn down their house, but what is done to prevent all this from becoming a big bonfire?
Interior walls and ceilings are, as I said, usually covered in drywall. It's a thin (1/4 to 1/2") sheet of plaster, chalk, or cement (or anything else that doesn't burn). It's nailed to the frame, plaster and spackle is applied to cover the nails and joints, and then it's painted or wallpapered.

Before the drywall is installed, fiberglass insulation is usually put in the frame. It has an extremely high melting temperature and does not burn, so it keeps the other side of the wall from reaching the ignition point.

The exterior of walls is generally covered in OSB, then wrapped in a non-flammable water barrier (Tyvek is what I see everyone using these days), and then siding is installed over the top of that, which is usually either pressure-treated lumber (which requires a lot of energy to burn) or fiberglass or plastic.

It's not meant to keep the house from burning down, but it does keep the house from allowing fires to spread. Fires can be relatively easily confined to a single room unless they grow out of control.

Commercial construction is generally steel-frame construction with cement and other high-test materials.

What's odd, though, is that wood-frame housing tends to last longer than steel-frame construction. smile

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