Welcome to Gaia! ::

A couple of things I use to speed bootup on Win9x and NT/XP systems:

In AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS, I adjust Win9x so it loads drivers like SETVER.EXE high, runs EMM386.EXE with noems as parameter, uses larger FILES, BUFFERS, STACKS, and FCBS than default, loads DLCHLP32 high, and gives me a better custom PATH and prompts than standard.

In MSCONFIG and SERVICES.MSC (as appropriate), I discard duplicate or redundant items in startup, eliminate spyware and unwanted applications routinely, and edit startup items like WIN.INI and SYSTEM.INI to do minor tweaks. I haven't used 'Normal Startup' on this system since I used MSCONFIG to yank RealPlayer tray and update junk and disable Task Scheduler.

For any Windows version, removing unused fonts will reduce the resources used and speed startup. Using Scandisk/Error Check and Defrag periodically can substantially, but you don't need the Task Scheduler. I find these tasks easier if I disable and exit all unneeded apps and run them manually.
Skye Darkhawk
MSConfig was first introduced in the Windows 9x generation. In being so.. outdated, it can only make you wonder if it is really doing what it is supposed to be doing in some of the newer generations. Also, it doesn't exist in all Windows OSes.

The idea is for you to always be in Normal Startup, not in Selective Startup. Selective Startup is meant to be part of the diagnostic tools built into Windows. Not a fallback option when things don't go the way you want them to.


The registry never has been a place of fear. It's really simple, and quite easy to backup and restore. Hell, you can export the key you plan on deleting, save it as a text file, and if it borks things, just double click it and back it goes. Plus if you save it on the desktop, you're reducing a few steps you have to take to restore your computer back to the previous point.

It was introduced in Windows 98/98 SE (I forget which). I believe it existed in Windows ME. It was updated for Windows XP, and where Windows XP and Windows 2000 are similar, it also works with Windows 2000. This means, that it's available with Microsoft Windows 98, Microsoft Windows ME, Microsoft Windows 2000* , Microsoft Windows 2000 Server*, Microsoft Windows XP, and Microsoft Windows 2003 Server.

It does exactly what it says it does.

Selective Startup is not a diagnostic mode. Selective Startup never has been a diagnostic mode.
The boot options(diagnostic modes) available to Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows 2000 Server, Microsoft Windows XP, Microsoft Windows 2003 Server, and possibly Microsoft Windows 98/98 SE and Microsoft Windows ME, are as follows:
/Safe Mode
/NOGUIBOOT
/BOOTLOG
/BASEVIDEO
/SOS
(as gotten from MSConfig.exe's boot.ini tab)

Selective Startup means a user customized startup. In this case, you have manually selected that you do not want said programs starting at boot.
Normal Mode simply means that you do not manually select anything, everything is automated, and this also means that all startup programs are automatically selected. You MUST go into the program itself and tell it to not start anything on boot.

The registry is not a place to fear if you know what you are doing in it. However, tell the average Joe to do something in the registry, and watch his eyes glaze over. Sit him in front of a Windows computer, open Regedit, and tell him to do something, and watch him pause, scratch his head, and ask what the hell he's supposed to do.

*MSConfig is not included in Windows 2000, or Windows 2000 Server, however, you can take the copy included in Windows XP Home or Windows XP Professional and use it with Windows 2000 or Windows 2000 Server.
Google defines diagnostic as: The testing method for locating faults in the system.

What you originally suggested for using MSConfig for, turning off options and seeing if the computer runs well or not, and if not, turning them back on, identifies with this definition.


I learned how to manipulate the registry on my own, and only read one or two articles on where some things were located. Typically if you give someone an exact location, they won't do anything until they reach that location.

Utilizing the tools available, such as the internet, can help prevent you from removing something drastic. Again, why I mentioned using it to look up things before you just go delete happy. Also, deleting everything but the (Default) entry won't cause harm. It may stop your firewall or antivirus software from starting up, but all you have to do is open the program, tell it to start up with your computer, and back it goes into the registry.
With linux 2.6 one can hibernate without ACPI, there are two drivers in kernel, swsusp & another one. Funny thing is, at least one of them needs ACPI driver present in kernel, no matter whether motherboard supports it or not.

I used swsusp on laptop with broken ACPI, it worked cool.
Skye Darkhawk
Google defines diagnostic as: The testing method for locating faults in the system.

What you originally suggested for using MSConfig for, turning off options and seeing if the computer runs well or not, and if not, turning them back on, identifies with this definition.

Therefore, "Selective Startup" is only considered diagnostic if you are indeed using it as such, which you would not be in this case. Play around with MSConfig to see what I mean.

If you still consider it a diagnostic mode, then it's a perfectly fine diagnostic mode indeed. I've gotten a 50 day uptime on the said diagnostic mode, with it only failing because of a power outage. If a diagnostic mode can do that them I have no problems with my system being in a constant diagnostic mode(this is not me saying that it is a diagnostic mode).

Then you misunderstood what I said.
What I said was, that instead of going through the registry to disable startup items, you can go through MSConfig and disable them. It does a similar thing(similar as in, no hassle with deleting or editing strings required), 3 times faster.
IF, IF you have a problem, it's easier and faster to enable the item again.

MSConfig can indeed be used as a diagnostic utility. Hell, most of the options are diagnostic options. Did I at any point suggest using it as such? No.
MrMadman's avatar

Perfect Regular

If you've observed the startup behaviour of MSConfig, you'll see that disabling registry items merely moves it to the key Run-, and RunServices-, etc. Removing the items in the Startup folder will make it move the shortcuts into a new folder called "Disabled Startup Items". The lines in INI files get commented out.

So therefore, Selective Startup only disables startup items for you. It does not impair system performance in any way. (Which is what I thought, and I think is what Shoroo_Lupin is getting at).
Lotsa discussion in this thread. Scholdn't we move it to another one, to leave this clean for readers?
dexen_of_wroclaw
Lotsa discussion in this thread. Scholdn't we move it to another one, to leave this clean for readers?

No. People are debating what things do and mean in here. That's fine. Civilized discussion, flame wars is frowned upon.
MrMadman
If you've observed the startup behaviour of MSConfig, you'll see that disabling registry items merely moves it to the key Run-, and RunServices-, etc. Removing the items in the Startup folder will make it move the shortcuts into a new folder called "Disabled Startup Items". The lines in INI files get commented out.

So therefore, Selective Startup only disables startup items for you. It does not impair system performance in any way. (Which is what I thought, and I think is what Shoroo_Lupin is getting at).

Exactly what I was getting at, thank you.

Quick Reply

Submit
Manage Your Items
Other Stuff
Get GCash
Offers
Get Items
More Items
Where Everyone Hangs Out
Other Community Areas
Virtual Spaces
Fun Stuff
Gaia's Games