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I'm trying to make a wire go from the board to the turn on and off volume knob that was soldered on it originally. Problem is, I'm a novice at this and was following pictures on how someone else did it, but I'm lost on what kind of wiring they used since the package they sent me didn't come with the wires they used. If anyone can help me out on this, it will be a big weight off my shoulders since it's the only thing that is hindering from moving on in it.
And something else that I think might be a problem, is that it had five pins and now has two pins, as seen in picture.
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I'm not sure on the exact size but you want insulated multistrand copper wire.
LifeWithHate
I'm trying to make a wire go from the board to the turn on and off volume knob that was soldered on it originally. Problem is, I'm a novice at this and was following pictures on how someone else did it, but I'm lost on what kind of wiring they used since the package they sent me didn't come with the wires they used.
You're going to have to show us those pictures. Clearly you missed a few steps.

It looks to me like you tried to rip the thing off the board and broke the three pins in the process. If that's the case, you've essentially ruined the potentiometer. Based on this picture, it looks as if you've damaged it badly enough that you have no choice but to replace it. You may have even damaged the via pads (the holes have copper on the walls of the hole) on the circuit board, tearing the copper out and causing damage to the board.

It has 5 pins because it's a stereo ganged potentiometer. It's two potentiometers (variable resistors) linked together. It's useless without all 5 pins in good condition.

It's hard to tell because of your red scribbles, but I'd wager that you've ruined everything, and repairing the circuit board well enough to make it work again will be nearly impossible, or at least very much not worth the effort.

The way you should have done this is to soften the solder with a soldering iron, then remove it from the pot's leads with a desoldering wick or suction tool, at which point it would have literally fallen out of the board. Then you could get some heat-shrink tubing (to protect the solder joint on the pot's pins and to bind the five wires together) and some common 22-gauge stranded patch wire and solder it into place.

As it is, though, I wouldn't bother now.

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