Welcome to Gaia! ::

Eizoryu
I don't read YA for that reason exactly.

And people screw up with fantasy the most because "Hurhur! It's FANTASY! Fantasy doesn't have rules lol!!11one!" That's just ignorance at work. It does too have rules. Just like any other genre, fantasy has rules to adhere to, too.

Blame the publishers. They're catering to a market that doesn't want to think, so they're publishing the same s**t in different genres/forms because it's a safe formula that's proven to work, because it's familiar to the consumer.

There ARE gems in the category. But you have to sift through all the garbage to find them. Needle in a haystack, if you ask me.

I don't read any YA either. What sucks is that once in a while, I might find a YA book or something that sounds interesting (and is usually part of a series which also sounds interesting) and...no one seems to talk about it. I look around to hear what people are saying about it, and by that I mean people who aren't professional critics (or have deluded themselves into thinking that) because they tend to say s**t about books and series' that are totally not true (that Twilight is gothic horror for instance).

Great example: This Dark Endeavor: The Apprenticeship of Victor Frankenstein. Oh, the critics would have you believe that it's a gothic horror that defies its YA categorization and stands high with the original novel. But then, let's not forget what they said about Twilight. So I've been apprehensive about getting it and reading it, especially since it features a love triangle at its center, and I'm reeeeaaally not eager to see something which may turn out to be the Twilight of the Frankenstein mythos.

But I don't see anyone talking about it. The worst part about that is, if it really is good, then that just goes to show how the popular stuff is not the good stuff.
Requiem ex Inferni's avatar

Eloquent Streaker

Eh, never bothered with young adult fiction. Spent most of high school reading books about WWII, and now I'm reading the Song of Ice and Fire series, with plans to acquire Tolkien's books again.
smrtness's avatar

Conservative Genius

I've never understood why people think it makes them seem so much cooler and smarter to say that they've never done anything but read adult books.

I've got the opposite opinion of most people in this thread - it's far harder for me to find an adult science fiction or fantasy book that I can't look at the cover and accurately predict every element of the plot of than it is young adult. Sure, there's plenty of formulaic crap out there, but honestly? Ignore the cliche of 'don't judge a book by its cover', and you can easily avoid them. Or, if you're in the US and go to Barnes and Noble, just avoid the 'teen paranormal romance' category, and you're set.
I suggest picking up some books by Francesca Lia Block. Her stories are more about the characters than they are about the fantasy elements. Characters in her books make mistakes, and they face consequences. There is no getting out of them, and there is very little Deus ex Machina elements if any at all. Immature characters are immature. They are not made out to be perfect like immature characters are in other YA books (Twilight), and most of the characters learn from their mistakes and grow as a result. I strongly suggest reading Dangerous Angels. This book has four novels within it. Each and every book is about making mistakes, growing up, growing spiritually, and facing problems both the right and the wrong ways. I also suggest her novella, Blood Roses, which touches on real issues such as teen sex, immigration, racism, self esteem, and loss. Her work usually involves romance, but it is a more mature romance than what you are probably used to seeing in a lot of YA.
Epistamai's avatar

Invisible Informer

5,100 Points
  • Invisibility 100
  • Popular Thread 100
  • Generous 100
Javier Cross


What?
No love for the Camp Half-Blood novels by Old-Man Rick Riordan, then?

Has Derek Landy flat-out abandoned us too much for the world of Skulduggery Pleasant to be considered, either?

Do I even need to go with what I find wrong with Tokyopop being no more, which means no more dot.hack light novels to go with, and in turn making a possible Potter-world vs dot.hack discussion much less likely to happen, if at all?
(P.S: Not gonna lie, the Ministry of Magic vs the CyberConnect/CC Corporation would be a more badass fight than anything to do with the Potter-world vs twilight, the latter we need a lot less of, right there!)


I agree whole-heartedly with you on the S.P. and Percy Jackson front. Great books, and interesting plots - they shouldn't be overlooked.
Malice is another great book, though I have to admit I only picked it up the first time because of its cool cover.
Other books that I genuinely liked were the 'Life As We Knew It' series and 'May-bird And The Ever-After' series, though I think they moved that over to the children's section. Haven't read it in awhile.
Lumenoire
Javier Cross


What?
No love for the Camp Half-Blood novels by Old-Man Rick Riordan, then?

Has Derek Landy flat-out abandoned us too much for the world of Skulduggery Pleasant to be considered, either?

Do I even need to go with what I find wrong with Tokyopop being no more, which means no more dot.hack light novels to go with, and in turn making a possible Potter-world vs dot.hack discussion much less likely to happen, if at all?
(P.S: Not gonna lie, the Ministry of Magic vs the CyberConnect/CC Corporation would be a more badass fight than anything to do with the Potter-world vs twilight, the latter we need a lot less of, right there!)


I agree whole-heartedly with you on the S.P. and Percy Jackson front. Great books, and interesting plots - they shouldn't be overlooked.
Malice is another great book, though I have to admit I only picked it up the first time because of its cool cover.
Other books that I genuinely liked were the 'Life As We Knew It' series and 'May-bird And The Ever-After' series, though I think they moved that over to the children's section. Haven't read it in awhile.


My friends and I even run a group involving those two, I could send you the invite if you're a role-player for either.
I still can't believe the lack of decency they get ignored or overlooked, although to be fair on Skulduggery's world, its as if Landy abandoned 90% of us in here(I'd say whole 100% were it not for the fact that he condemned what happened in the Colorado shoot-out!) but for any of the Camp Half-Blood novels, with the Demigod Diaries coming in next month, there's no excuse frankly!

You got more going on?
What about the Codex Alera novels by Jim Butcher?
Anja Starfish's avatar

6,700 Points
  • Invisibility 100
  • Tycoon 200
  • Generous 100
For the most part, I do agree. YA books can be pretty bad. Sometimes they are enjoyable, but predictable the way a lot of YA books are. (I felt this way about the Hunger Games.)

However, I have come across some YA books that I really enjoyed. Robin McKinley writes a lot of books I think count as YA, and I adore her. Well, mostly. I didn't like her book Sunshine, but it's not YA so I won't go into it. I definitely recommend reading her stuff. The first book I read of hers was Spindle's End, and I thought it was wonderful. Robin McKinley's strongest point is her beautiful descriptions.
Lilac Wood's avatar

Lavish Wench

12,350 Points
  • Object of Affection 150
  • Jolly Roger 50
  • Battle Hardened 150
YA is such a huge market right now. It's no wonder so many of the titles available are just dribble. They're just looking to publish marketable titles, and the easiest way to do that is to promote those that have similarities to other popular books.
Riku Masen's avatar

Chatty Seeker

Most of the books I do read are YA. I haven't read anything new recently though, it's mostly just continuations of series' that I got into awhile ago.

I am tired with the same ol' same ol' though. Strange alluring guy meets not so special girl. It's like they're taking their template from Twilight.

There is a lot of good series in YA. When you've been reading it for 5 years you do find a good amount. I think it just depends on what you like to read. I personally like reading YA because they're generally quick reads that are written to entertain and enjoy.
Epiphany of Nothingness 's avatar

Anxious Browser

6,250 Points
  • Popular Thread 100
  • Forum Sophomore 300
  • Gender Swap 100
I find few that catch my interest but if I don't like it, I stop reading. Most I get from the library.
What books did u pick up?
Klaark's avatar

8,150 Points
  • The Perfect Setup 150
  • Risky Lifestyle 100
  • Conversationalist 100
I don't really understand the YA genre.

IF The Hunger Games is a YA novel, then the difference between a YA and an adult books seems to be that YA lacks an overbearing sense of cynicism, and semen. Beyond that, I haven't noticed much of a difference.
VulpineGirl's avatar

Tipsy Cutie-Pie

6,850 Points
  • Protector of Cuteness 150
  • Forum Regular 100
  • Money Never Sleeps 200
Klaark
I don't really understand the YA genre.

IF The Hunger Games is a YA novel, then the difference between a YA and an adult books seems to be that YA lacks an overbearing sense of cynicism, and semen. Beyond that, I haven't noticed much of a difference.


This may be just me, but I think for a book to fit in the YA genre, it has to appeal to a younger generation. Because Twilight and Matched (both books that I really dislike) are really popular with this generation, this is what most YA is. Fantasy's creepy wannabe. Since every generation's taste varies, the books in YA varies as the people get interested in reading them.
Altessa Belmont's avatar

Devoted Sage

Tiggermyk
Every single genre has bad writing, overdone plots, and egotistical authors. Seriously, guys, the YA section is nothing special--it may just stand out more to people who are in the targeted age-range.

How about instead of randomly picking up books, try to actively search out the good ones? Don't just find the ones "everyone" is talking about; look for the ones that are award-winners. I personally look for books that are endorsed by my favorite authors: if Neil Gaiman says it's good, then I'll probably like it. Maybe you prefer people similar to John Green, or Maureen Johnson, or, heck, Ni-Ni Simone. It takes no time at all to open up the front page and take a glance at who says what about the book in your hand.


This happened to me with Tamora Pierce twice. She was one of the first authors I picked up in grade school with her "Circle of Magic" series, but years passed and I forgot about it. Later, in high school, I grabbed "Trickster's Choice," thinking it looked good, without remembering who the author was. Just this year, I picked up the Beka Cooper trilogy, and got a good laugh when I finally realized I've always gravitated to her work without noticing it.

People need to look at who an author they like is friends with. It can help them find a new series they'll like that might not be as advertised or look as flashy.
Altessa Belmont
Tiggermyk
Every single genre has bad writing, overdone plots, and egotistical authors. Seriously, guys, the YA section is nothing special--it may just stand out more to people who are in the targeted age-range.

How about instead of randomly picking up books, try to actively search out the good ones? Don't just find the ones "everyone" is talking about; look for the ones that are award-winners. I personally look for books that are endorsed by my favorite authors: if Neil Gaiman says it's good, then I'll probably like it. Maybe you prefer people similar to John Green, or Maureen Johnson, or, heck, Ni-Ni Simone. It takes no time at all to open up the front page and take a glance at who says what about the book in your hand.


This happened to me with Tamora Pierce twice. She was one of the first authors I picked up in grade school with her "Circle of Magic" series, but years passed and I forgot about it. Later, in high school, I grabbed "Trickster's Choice," thinking it looked good, without remembering who the author was. Just this year, I picked up the Beka Cooper trilogy, and got a good laugh when I finally realized I've always gravitated to her work without noticing it.

People need to look at who an author they like is friends with. It can help them find a new series they'll like that might not be as advertised or look as flashy.


She's not a YA author, but I always forget how much I like Julia Quinn. Her niche isn't my usual cup of tea--historical romance--so I tend to pass her up for years at a time before finally picking up one of her books again and rediscovering all over how smart and funny she is. smile

Man, I use the "who does this author like?" trick all the time. Most recently I discovered Benedict Jacka because of a quote on the front from Jim Butcher, and Linda Winstead Jones because Linda Howard seems to be good friends with her.

Quick Reply

Submit
Manage Your Items
Other Stuff
Get Items
Get Gaia Cash
Where Everyone Hangs Out
Other Community Areas
Virtual Spaces
Fun Stuff
Gaia's Games