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Nathaniel Mea's avatar

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To the list of great japanese comic artists, I would add Kaoru Mori who did the Emma and Otoyomegatari books. She start off as a not so great artist in her Emma books and by the end of Emma Afterstories she is an amazing artist that use the style she use in a very creative way. Not only is she a (in my opinion, of course) fantastic artist, but she is also a great storyteller if you like the slowly paced period romance kind of stories.
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Nathaniel Mea
To the list of great japanese comic artists, I would add Kaoru Mori who did the Emma and Otoyomegatari books. She start off as a not so great artist in her Emma books and by the end of Emma Afterstories she is an amazing artist that use the style she use in a very creative way. Not only is she a (in my opinion, of course) fantastic artist, but she is also a great storyteller if you like the slowly paced period romance kind of stories.


I was first "bleaargh, blargh, boring" when I first saw Emma in the stores. Years later Emma was one of the very few mangas I really liked. Great story with well done art.
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Someone should sticky this XD
Annie Felis's avatar

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Vjii
Someone should sticky this XD


Stickies get ignored, unfortunately.
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Annie Felis
Vjii
Someone should sticky this XD


Stickies get ignored, unfortunately.


that is true isnt it :/

at least lets keep the thread on the first page like the "uninspired ..." thread. :3
Soprano Mochi Kitty
This was really well-written. 3nodding

BTW, you say that people would have less problems with light source and shading if they drew from real life, but...I do that a lot (I'm the kind of person who likes to stare at something for a really long time and observe before drawing) and yet I still struggle with shading and light sources. xD; In high school art class, we did several shading practices, the first of which was mannequin drawing. We had to start from where the shadows of the mannequin were and gradually build up to the part where light hits it the most. Unfortunately because the room was so well lit, I was literally unable to determine the light source there, nor was I able to see a difference in color in the mannequin on the part where light didn't hit, so I just chose the light source overhead rather than any other direction (like hitting the mannequin from the top left/top right/etc). |D; Another problem I have is knowing how to shade naturally. My shading always seem blocky, and while that works for objects like buildings and trees (in which you can clearly see their shadows reflected), it doesn't work for humans or many clothing fabrics. Animals are even harder to determine light sources with. Drew this a long time ago for a friend (btw, Winrii was what my then FMA-obsessed friends used to call me), but as you can see, the shading there has much to be desired. White cats are more of a nuisance to try and determine light sources with so I tend to constantly drawing them. sweatdrop


When you're watching TV or a movie, watch where they light things from. When artists set up light sources most of us don't really know what we're doing. We get something that looks OK but rarely anything properly dramatic. If I want to study light sources that tell a story I look at live action.

Life drawing is invaluable, but quite often the lighting itself is rather boring. Keep an eye out for good lighting in real life like when a friend is sitting down for breakfast in front of a window when the sun is still low, (you should notices a bit of a glowing halo outline around their hair). Or the glow of a computer screen on someone's face. Maybe someone reading a book under a lamp. Or you can set up a still life and play with your own light sources. It might even be worth it to look up lighting methods for film and video. Try bouncing your light off of white paper for a different effect etc.

Aside from that keep doing what you're doing and follow fansub's advice too.



As an animator I'm partially a film student, so I tend to think of lighting in terms of how it applies to narrative video more often than not. Some of my favourite lighting is in BBC's Sherlock and in Battlestar Galactica.

BBC's Being Human vs SyFy's Being Human makes for an interesting comparison. Syfy's lighting is always trying to emphasize that we're dealing with the supernatural. Things are often in shadow with a lot of contrast, this makes their version of the show more of a spooky supernatural world. BBC's lighting for Being Human is much less dramatic. They go for a flatter more natural looking world but they've desaturated the colour to show that not all is normal. This gives more emphasis onto the human side of the supernatural main characters.

In this case I like BBC's approach. The name of the show being the reason. It's about monsters (werewolf, ghost, vampire) trying to live normal human lives.

The BBC goes for the crazy dramatic lighting in Sherlock though, where there's a lot of Mr. Holmes sitting around looking pensive, and to make his sitting around looking pensive more profound and interesting they amp up the drama with the lighting and shadow contrast making him a more mysterious character. Sherlock is, after all, a mystery show.

For really cheesy lighting, look to your nearest soft golden glow soap opera. I never know whether to laugh at it's failure or cry at how painfully cheesy it is, normally I just turn it off. But I suppose it's now a bit of a trademark for those kinds of shows. I guess some people like it.

/end that-was-so-geeky-in-so-many-ways
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Nathaniel Mea
To the list of great japanese comic artists, I would add Kaoru Mori who did the Emma and Otoyomegatari books. She start off as a not so great artist in her Emma books and by the end of Emma Afterstories she is an amazing artist that use the style she use in a very creative way. Not only is she a (in my opinion, of course) fantastic artist, but she is also a great storyteller if you like the slowly paced period romance kind of stories.

I agree, but I can't seem to find a collection of her works anywhere. I'd like to be able to link to some sort of gallery.
Nice thread. It seems that this'll help all the aspiring artist in my class. I'll be honest, I thought this was just going to be one of those threads that are "just draw from life, we accpet nothing less!" kinda threads. But I'm glad you put a lot of links, tips and the posters did their fair shares (love the bird step-by-step posting). I'm one of those...'animu' drawers, and sometimes I feel conflicted in the comments I get. Most are "nice drawing, you're so great', whiles others give me the draw form life comment. If you're in need of more bad examples, I'll be happy to hand over my DA to you. ^^'

I vote for sticky <3
Thank you for the amazing examples and for taking the time to write all of this out smile
Lavi 8U's avatar

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YES!!! heart
This thread is amazing! I don't know how long I've been trying to explain the exact same things! Though you explain it so much better than I do xD.
But this is important to know, for anybody of any skill level.

Reading the comments for the first couple pages many expressed concerns about people using the tl;dr excuse. But what if AD and PP Regs got together to make a video version of the thread? That way you can include many more visual examples and have it be more time efficient.

Then if people don't watch it, it will not be because they're too lazy to read, but because they honestly don't want to improve.
            As soon as I get a proper signature with tutorial/theorycraft links, this one goes there. No buts.

            edit: ololstolethe100thpost
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I think it might be important to mention the fact that they're not going to be good at life drawing right away. A surprising amount of people think it's supposed to be easy.
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Oh thank you thank you THANK YOU for this.

Now I just sincerely hope that those that need this actually take the time to read through it. I will definitely be linking this often in the future.
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Lavi 8U
Reading the comments for the first couple pages many expressed concerns about people using the tl;dr excuse. But what if AD and PP Regs got together to make a video version of the thread? That way you can include many more visual examples and have it be more time efficient.

I have the video editing skills of a retarded snail, so I can't help you there, but I fully endorse this idea and will happily put the video at the very top of the OP if someone makes one.

x_Silver_Starlight_x
I think it might be important to mention the fact that they're not going to be good at life drawing right away. A surprising amount of people think it's supposed to be easy.

Yeah, I forgot about that, thanks. Gonna add it to the OP.

@Everyone else -- thanks for your support! heart I'm very happy the thread was well received.
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wonderful context =)
i am also working on trying to master my art
this has helped me quite a bit

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