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What medium do you use more?

Pencil/Charcoal/Pastel related 0.46341463414634 46.3% [ 152 ]
Watercolor/Ink/Ink Wash 0.13109756097561 13.1% [ 43 ]
Oil/Acrylic Painting 0.082317073170732 8.2% [ 27 ]
Digital 0.22560975609756 22.6% [ 74 ]
Other 0.097560975609756 9.8% [ 32 ]
Total Votes:[ 328 ]
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Though materials won't help you with your skills, they do have a positive impact and can often help to make things easier for artist. So let's share and review our favorite brands, it may help someone to save some money when buying materials.

▐█▌Index
Materials for Sketching & Drawing

■Pencils ■Pens ■Paper

Materials for Ink & Watercolor
■Brush ■Inks&Colors ■Paper

Materials for Pastel & Oil Paintings
■Pastels ■Brush ■Paint ■Canvas/Paper/Board ■Solvent/Cleaner

Materials for Digital Art
■Software(2D) ■Software(3D) ■Hardware

▐█▌Art Supply Sites
d**k Blick (or Blick Art)
Utrecht
Pearl Paint
CarpeDiem

For now, we are limiting this to drawing and painting related things. Would appreciate it if you can keep your review in the following format:
Quote:
For: drawing/sketching, inking and watercolor, painting, digital
Material type: Pen, Paper, Oil Paint, Pastel, Software program etc
Brand:
Where to purchase it (please list a store or web site URL if the brand is not commonly found in average art stores)
Price comparing to other brands: cheaper, average, expensive
Pro:
Con:
Materials for Sketching & Drawing

▐█▌Pencils:

Prismacolor
Pro: Beautiful, bright and rich colors. Wide selection of colors, all of which match perfectly with markers of the same brand. Smooth and soft cores allow for superior blending and layering on paper of any texture. Pencils have a smaller learning curve compared to wet media and are therefore great tools for professionals or beginners. Lightfast and waterproof.
Con: The softness of the cores means they are prone to breakage, and don't hold a sharp tip as long as harder cores. They are slightly waxy, and thus will create a shiny film on the page after excessive layering and smoothing, preventing further layers.
Price: Slightly above average

Derwent Pencil
Pro: They are pretty smooth and about the feel of Prismacolor colored pencils. They're also thicker than your average pencil and leads seem to be damn well centered, and the pencils are straight as an arrow.
Con: They dont blend well, not as smooth as prismacolor, dont layer nicely. The colors are not as accurate. Their reds are pink, their greens are brown or blue, and their blues are grey or purple.
Price: Average

Crayola Coloured Pencil
Pro: Pretty, bright colours. Great blending and layering. High quality-- insanely high considering the price.
Con: As far as I know it's impossible to buy separate pencils, so when you run out of a particular colour you must buy an entire set.
Price: Very cheap

Koh-I-Noor Pencils
Pro: A huge selection of high-quality products.
Con: None I'd know of.
Price: Average

PrismColor Col-Erase
Pro: These pencils can be erased rather cleanly, without leaving too much marks.
Con: They have a waxy base, which makes it hard to go over with a non-oil based pencil, such as charcoal pencil or pastel pencil. (Regular graphite pencil works ok)
Price: Average

FaberCastell Col-Erase
Pro: Non-oil based pencils can go over it easily. Which makes this one ideal for sketching, and re-trace it later with a pastel or charcoal pencil.
Con: Does not erase well.
Price: Unfortunately it seems this is discontinued.

FaberCastell Pastel Pencil
Pro: Oil based is clean and won't smudge easily. Non-oil based has darker color. Both can be sharpened to a fine point for detailed works.
Con: None so far.
Price: Average

General's Charcoal Pencil
Pro: Much smoother than the Loew-Cornell Charcoal Pencils, they are also darker than the LC's, more of a true black; they hold a good point and sharpen well.
Con: None so far
Price: Average

Staedtler line of pencil
Pro: Covers all hardness you will ever imagine, very good range of darkness. Tip: You don't need every grade of pencil they give you. Buy the smaller box of 6.
Con: The 7B and 8B feel a little sticky IMO.
Price: Slightly above average

Koh-I-Noor
Pro: Pencils, they are cheap.
Con: The 8B in this line compares to the 6B of Staedtler. Not dark enough. Found some impurities in the lead at times, very annoying. Would recommend dishing out a few extra dollars for Staedtlers.
Price: Average


▐█▌Erasers:
Staedtler gum eraser
Pro: very gentle on the paper and doesn't gouge already inked work. Doesn't smudge paper
Con: None so far
Price: Average

Staedtler Eraser
Pro: You know those annoying smudges you sometimes get no matter how careful you are with the shields you use? Yeah this takes care of that like nothing.
Con: Need to use cleaning brush to sweep away eraser grit otherwise you smudge more.
Price: Average

Design Eraser
Pro: Doesn't leave behind anything on the paper and can be molded to fit into wee tiny spaces.
Con: If you put it in your pencil bag, it will pick up the tiny bits of lead that break off the pencils and can cause the lead in the eraser to transfer onto the paper instead of having it erase....(solved by kneading eraser thoroughly before use in general)
Price: Cheap


▐█▌Pens:
Le Pen (can also be used for inking)
Pro: Fine tip, the lighter colors are great for sketching
Con: It's water based, may bleed a little depend on the paper. May also be washed off using a wet brush.
Price: Average

Copic Regular pen (can also be used for inking)
Pro: The fine tip as well as the chisel so it gives more options. It's refillable and the nibs can be replaces if needed. Ink blends well, it also has the same colors as the copic sketch so it can be used with it. Both pens can be used with their air brush system.
Con: None so far.
Price: Expensive, but cheaper in the long run

Copic Wide pen (can also be used for inking)
Pro: It works with other copics and the wide nib keeps wide areas smother with less streakiness.It can be refilled and I believe this nib is also replaceable.
Con: None so far.
Price: Expensive

Copic multiliner (can also be used for inking)
Pro: It works with other copics, its ink doesn't smear when used with other copics and it comes in a variety of colors as well as several sizes for the black pens. It's refillable and durable.
Con: The colors only come in the BS and .3 sizes
Price: Expensive


▐█▌Sketch Markers:
Copic Sketch markers
Pro: Easy to blend, has a brush tip, and easy to handle, you can refill them and replace the nibs, and come in alot of colors.
Con: Makes most inking bleed, very juicy markers so they bleed through paper, and are expensive, can be hard to find unless buying online
Price: Average


▐█▌Paper:
Utrecht or Cachet's Recycled Sketch Pads
Pro: Durable, and great toned texture. The paper is not meant for watercolor, but can handle medium amount of marker usage.
Con: None so far.
Price: Expensive

Strathmore
Pro: Durable, won't tear apart easily. Can handle light watercolor and medium amount of marker usage.
Con: None so far
Price: Below Average

Canson
Pro: Durable, the toned pastel papers are ideal for drawings that'll have shadings. Not really meant for watercolor.
Con: None so far
Price: Average
Materials for Ink, Watercolor & Markers

▐█▌Brush:
Pentel Aqua Water Brush
Pro: This brush has a water reservoir, which makes it convenient for on-the-go watercolor paintings, also makes it easier to clean the brush. The brush is made of fine nylon threads, and works just like a normal synthetic-hair brush.
Con: The water flow is not always consistent. It worked well in the first few weeks of usage, afterward, the water either don't flow out and leave brush too dry, or when you squeeze the water reservoir, too much water will keep over-moisturizing the brush.
Price: Average

Niji Waterbrush
Pro: Convenient for doing watercolor without having to carry a bottle of watter. The brush is made of fine nylon and acts like normal brush. There are more selection for brush size and shapes.
Con: The water flow is a little too much, and keep the brush overly wet.
Price: Average

Koi waterbrush
Pro: koi waterbrush is great when you're on the go. I use it to add a bit of volume and shade to my sketches, either by using a couple of watercolor crayons, or my col-erase (they have less pigment, but they still do a good job). Once you're done, just press the brush to get a couple of drops of water in the palm of your hand and wash it.
Con: Its material is synthetic and cheap, it's tip will get stained, but it still does a great job at what it's made for; a brush for quick watercolor sketches when you're away from home and all of your material.
Price: Average

Utrecht Design Markers
Pro: Affordable, low-odor, easier to find than alternatives, good blending, brush nib, comparable to Copic Sketch.
Con: Only 71 colors currently, no ink refills sold.
Price: Cheaper than most other brands



▐█▌Pens, Markers and Nibs:
Ackerman Pump Pens
Pro: Fountain type pen, but can use your own inks and nibs like a dip pen. Can "pump" ink out of reservoir on to the nib. Very easy to clean, can use a variety of liquid mediums (ink, paint, watercolor, coffee, grape juice). Great for sketching and experimenting.
Con: Be warned, Ackerman Pens is notorious for taking forever to fulfill your order. My professor's pen came in 2 years after he ordered it! Customer service is reportedly awful. Isn't sold anywhere else other than the official website. This pen is not good for precision work or if you want total control over your strokes.
Price: Average

Pentel Pocket Brush Pen
Pro: Gives you beautiful lines, it's refillable and the ink is dark and smooth. Great control and ink flow.
Con: Nothing so far
Price: Average

Shinhan
Pro:bright like Prismacolor and the blending is good too.
Con: None so far.
Price: Average to Below average

Copic Regular pen
Pro: The fine tip as well as the chisel so it gives more options. It's refillable and the nibs can be replaces if needed. Ink blends well, it also has the same colors as the copic sketch so it can be used with it. Both pens can be used with their air brush system.
Con: None so far.
Price: Expensive, but cheaper in the long run

Copic Wide pen
Pro: It works with other copics and the wide nib keeps wide areas smother with less streakiness.It can be refilled and I believe this nib is also replaceable.
Con: None so far.
Price: Expensive

Copic multiliner
Pro: It works with other copics, its ink doesn't smear when used with other copics and it comes in a variety of colors as well as several sizes for the black pens. It's refillable and durable.
Con: The colors only come in the BS and .3 sizes
Price: Expensive

Faber-Castell Pitt artist pen (grayscale)
Pro: Good grayscale markers, colour is vibrant, guaranteed lightfastness/waterproof, brush tip
Con: Non blendable, ink runs out fast if you do big surfaces, marker doesn't last long and isn't refillable, brush tip good for details but, again, bad for big surfaces.
Price: Expensive

Hunt nibs
Pro: Sturdy nibs, come in packs in case one breaks, good for detail
Con: Can snap or split, causing weird lines.
Price: Cheap

Letraset Markers
Pro:They don't bleed, no matter the type of paper you use(i've tried a few now), and they've got two tips--Chisel and pointed. The chisel is great for coloring large areas, and the pointed is good for getting the small bits.
Con: None so far
Price: Expensive


▐█▌Inks and Colors:
Cotman
Pro: The color is consistent and rich. The dried paint can be re-used easily with water.
Con:
Price: Average

Speedball Super Black India Ink
Pro: Ink is waterproof upon drying; dries quickly. Deep black pigment doesn't fade with time or lift from erasing. Can be used for drawing with nibs, brushes, or pens. Can also be used for ink painting when diluted with water and used with a brush.
Con: Not alcohol-proof, and may smear with alcohol-based markers unless a fixative is used.
Price: Cheap

Pelikan Opaque paint box K24
Pro: Rich colors, lots of colors in one set + a tube of Chinese white. The colors are separated into cartages which can be replaced after used up. It is easy to maintain and clean.
Con: None so far
Price: Slightly above average

Higgs Black Magic Ink
Pro: good quality, rich black, waterproof
Con: If you spill it, you're out $10. You can try sucking the ink back up with the well's little dropper, but yeah. Spilling these things is a holy terror.
Price: average


▐█▌Paper:
Ampersand Aquabord
Pro: Behaves like a regular watercolor paper, allows bleed and color blend, but will not wrap or tear when excessive water is added.
Con: None so far
Price: Slightly above average

Strathmore Bristol vellum
Pro: Durable, and great toned texture. The paper is not meant for watercolor, but can handle medium amount of marker usage.
Con: None so far.
Price: Expensive

Bordon & Riley Bleedproof paper for pens
Pro: I used it with copics, it dries fast so you don't have smudges, it doesn't bleed through, thick paper so it's more durable and less prone to wrinkling
Con: Harder to mix colors but it is possible, it will bleed through in some cases, putting something between the paper being used and the clean pages fixes this so it's not a major problem
Price: Average

Staedtler plain vallum
Pro: I used it with copics, ink pools on paper for easier mixing of colors, doesn't bleed.
Con: It takes a while to dry so smudging can be a problem, thinner than bristol board and the other papers so wrinkling is a possibility
Price: Average

Bee paper acid-free bleedproof paper
Pro: I used it with copics, It's comparable with bristol and the other thick papers and it does not bleed through
Con: It's loose rather than in a pad so storage may be a problem, Looking it up I see it comes in pads too.
Price: Average

Canson marker pro layout
Pro: You can pool ink on the paper for easy color mixing. It's a happy medium between papers that don't dry quickly and bristol.
Con: Some smudging may happen but not as much as some of the papers I looked at.
Price: Average

Bee Paper
Pro: It's a heavyweight paper, but has a glossy finish to it--not so much that your pencil is weak on it, but enough that when using markers or paint with it, it doesn't bleed. It's smooth, and pretty cheap for a pack of it, if you can get it on sale.
Con: None so far
Price: Cheap
Materials for Pastel & Oil Paintings

▐█▌Pastels:
PanPastels
Pro:The panpastels are kind of like makeup. It's best to use sponges for them since they come in a little container, and basically you just smudge it on your surface area. You won't be able to get fine details with this, so you would also have to bring in other brands. It has low-dust because of it's compacted nature, so it would be good to use for broad areas of color or soft touches.
Con:Not for details
Price:Average

Prismacolor Nupastels
Pro: They're very controllable, and don't wear down or break as fast as soft pastels.
Con: You really need a gritty, sandpaper-like surface to get the most out of them, else there's not much you can do to blend or layer.
Price: Average

Sennelier Soft pastels
Pro: They are pricey but are crafted in France with love and magic. If you love pastels and want to spoil yourself dumb with the best pastels out there, you want to order a set of these. They are colored chalk butter. They are of equal quality to their oil pastel but these are chalk.
Con:
Price: Expensive


▐█▌Oil Pastels:
Sennelier Oil Pastels
Pro: The pigment are rich and it goes on paper smoothly, the sticks are pretty soft. Easy to blend the colors on paper (or gessobord). There's a great variety of colors, and the metallic hues are excellent for additional texture and shine.
Con: None
Price: Very expensive

Holbein Oil Pastels
Pro: Great colors and easy to blend.
Con: None
Price: Very expensive

ProArt Oil Pastels
Pro: Reasonable for beginners
Con: The oil will dry out over time and make the stick crumbles. Not very easy to blend colors on paper.
Price: Very Cheap

▐█▌Brush:
Windsor Newton University Series
Pro:
Con:
Price:

Utrecht sablette brushes
Pro:
Con:
Price:

Princeton Synthetic Sable Brushes Series 4050 Liner #2
Pro: flexible, soft, good for the FINEST detail and will stand up to oil paint and solvent, even though it's technically a watercolour brush
Con: NEVER MIX PAINTS WITH THESE. It'll kill them, and break your heart.
Price: Cheap


▐█▌Paints:
Utrecht Acrylic
Pro: Amazing quality at an amazing price.
Con:
Price: Average

Holbein Oil Color
Pro: Rich colors and won't yellow over time.
Con: None so far
Price: Expensive

Old Holland Classic Oil Colors
Pro: This is what the old masters were using. The color is rich and vibrant. The paint will not yellow over time.
Con: None so far
Price: Very Expensive

Rembrandt Artists' Oil Colors
Pro: Good color and won't yellow.
Con: None so far
Price: Average

M. Graham
Pro: Walnut oil as a base, so better for the environment. They give a brighter color. It needs to be cleaned with Canola oil instead of Turpentine or turpenoid, so a nice money saver there. Because you're working with more natural oils and cleaners it's healthier for you as well. The brushes last longer since they can be cleaned with gentler things.
Con: If you're allergic to Walnuts do NOT use this paint. They can be difficult to find, though they're starting to grow in popularity.
It's hard to share supplies with other artists unless they use this kind of oil as well.
Price: Average

Unknown brand Oil Paint crayons
Pro: THEY ARE FUN! Whole, whole lot of fun! Very good way to do emotional works. Layer easily. Dry overnight.
Con: Dry overnight.. Even the crayon's exterior. We ended up cutting off the tip every time we wanted to use them again... Very, very different from traditional painting. Sometimes this can be good, but they take some time to get used to because of this.
Price: Unknown

Winsor Newton
Pro: Fairly good quality, doesn't dry up fast. Less filler than student grade.
Con: Not as good as Old Holland, tubes can crack if you're too rough with them, causing your paint to dry out.
Price: Average


▐█▌Canvas/Paper/Board:
Strathmore 500 Illustration boards
Pro: Unlike Crescent paper, Strathmore will not warp or bubble
Con: None so far
Price: Average

Ampersand GessoBoard
Pro: This is a hard board, it will not wrap or bend due to temperature or humility. Great for both pastel and oil paintings. Compare to pastel papers, it's easier to blend colors if you are using pastels (for both soft pastels and oil pastels)
Con: None so far
Price: Slightly above average

Canson Vellums
Pro: While it's not a traditional paper for oil painting, it's great for quick oil painting practices. The oil won't eat through the paper due to the special texture. And it's long lasting
Con: The surface can get too slippery due to its smoothness, and may not hold onto paint if too much paint is piled on.
Price: Cheap

Silicon Carbide Waterproof Sandpaper
Pro: It takes pastels very nicely, and has an interesting, subtle sheen to the surface.
Con: Unsure
Price: Average


▐█▌Solvent/Cleaner:
Kiss-Off Stain Remover
Pro: Good for removing oil paint stains from clothing, carpet, upholstery, etc. Non-toxic and very portable. In addition to oil paint removal, it also works well on lipstick, grease, grass, blood, food, make up, and - according to the packaging -- mystery stains.
Con: May cause discolouration of fabric, and should be tested in a discreet area beforehand (as with all stain removers).
Price: Cheap-Average

Taltine/Odourless mineral spirit/odourless solvent
Pro: Doesn't smell, cleans just as well as anything else. can be used a dry-cleaning fluid (It's petroleum distillate)
Con: Doesn't smell so you aren't sure of how much you are exposed to. I find it more volatile than other solvents.
Price: Average

Masters Brush Cleaner
Pro: Smells amazing, non-toxic, rejuvenates the feel of your bristles even if you've left paint on your brush to harden.
Con: None so far
Price: Expensive

Gamsol (Solvent)
Pro: Pure odorless mineral spirits, less toxic then ALL OTHER oil solvents, developed by artists, for artists
Con: still toxic. It'll just kill you slower. Also, not as useful as turpentine for making mediums.
Price: Cheap
Materials for Digital Art

▐█▌Software (2D):
Adobe Photoshop
Pro: Great tool for any 2 dimensional digital works. Though there's a learning curve, one can achieve many various painting styles using Photoshop, including styles strongly resemble traditional oil painting or watercolor. It has many features that allow artists to make different adjustment and apply different effects (I don't mean filter effects, but rather texture or movements) to their art work.
Con: There's a huge learning curve
Price: Though a washed down version (Photoshop Element) usually comes in free when you purchase a tablet or good printer, the full version is very very expensive

Corel Painter
Pro: If you were trained as a painter, you will most likely find this program very intuitive. It simulates many different mediums, and painting is "easier" than in Photoshop.
Con: Has wayyy less image editing capabilities than Photoshop. If you have the resources, it's advantageous to invest in both.
Price: About $300 for full version of Corel Painter 11 (latest version); but if you have a previous version, it's $150 for the full upgrade
If you are a student you can get the Education Edition for around $70 US from the Corel store online. Link the only difference between this and the full version is you don't get the Corel tech support and you can't legally make any profit off of it.

OpenCanvas
Pro: Its pencil and watercolor tools resembles the feeling of its non-digital counter parts. Though the features are limited compare to Photoshop, it's enough for most of the digital artists out there.
Con: Though the later versions had added many features, it's still behind compare to Photoshop.
Price: About $83.

PaintTool SAI
Pro: Is quite useful in drawing neat and smooth lines, being more forgiving than other programs like Photoshop. Is actually affordable, and purchasing a copy means you've purchased 10 copies for 10 different computers. Brushes are simple yet customizable.
Con: Not as many tools, filters, bells and whistles as other programs. Developer has stopped working on it due to annoyance over piracy of his program. Has no CMYK support, and crashes/locks up at resolutions higher than 300dpi, so ultimately the program is not print-friendly.
Price: Below average. About $63 USD

ToonBoom storyboard
Pro: There's nothing in storyboard pro that you can't do in other software but it brings it all into one streamlined program with practical export and comment functions. If you can afford it, it's perfect for storyboards and animatics.
Con: It's a really nice piece of software, but it costs an additional 700$ if you want the pro version and really... there's nothing in it to explain why it should cost that much.
Price: Average ($199.99)

ArtWeaver
Pro: Pretty much the same interface as Painter. Free. Doesn't take much space on your hard drive (22mb for version 1.0)
Con: Might occassionally crash.
Price: FREE


▐█▌Software (3D):

Google Sketchup
Pro: Sketchup is 3D for dummies... really, really unintelligent dummies. It's mostly used to do mockups and it's great to layout a scene. Just lay out some blocks and basic models, turn around your scene to find a good angle and voila! you've got a great base for your drawing. Other then giving you a chance to explore your scene before committing to a final camera view, it's also great when you want to do several drawings, in different angles, of the same place while keeping everything accurately in place.
Google sketchup also has an extensive library of 3D items you can use to layout your scene and lets you share your own model with the rest of the community.
Con: It's no where near as powerful as other 3D software.
Price: Free

Autodesk Maya
Pro: Industry standard for 3D modeling. Very versatile, great with effects. Has good animation capabilities.
Con: VERY high learning curve, not intuitive at all. Do not use without saving constantly and backing up said save files, has been known to shut down randomly and destroy your work.
Price: Expensive. $3,495 for just the program. There is a free trial for students learning the program, but it will come with annoying watermarks.

Blender3D
Pro: It's full 3D software with lots of forums and people willing to help you. Lots of youtube videos. You could create movies in it, games.
Con: It's not a professional tool. It has a steep learning curve.
Price: Free


▐█▌Hardware:
Wacom Intuos
Pro: Great with pen pressure and supports titling. Wacom is the brand to get when it comes to tablets.
Con: Intuos 4's pen nib tend to wear down faster.
Price: Slightly above average

Aiptek SlimTablet-600U
Pro: The tablet is big for the price you pay, great pressure sensitivity, slim and light. The surface on which one draws has a nice feel, yet it is not causing the nibs to wear out fast.
Con: Windows 7 does not support its pressure sensitivity. Updated: The Zorya confirmed it works with Win 7
Price: Cheap
Things to Pay Attention To

When purchasing watercolor, oil paints, and even pastel sticks, make sure to check the label and see if there's any toxic warning. Most cadmium and cobalt colors are toxic, and should be handled with caution. i.e. don't spray paint these colors, avoid contact with eyes and mouth, wash immediately if color gets on skin. etc

Books
Queen Pirate Bunny's avatar

Perfect Cutie-Pie

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If you are an acrylic painter there is no reason to buy anything other than Utrecht's brand of paint. It is amazing quality at an amazing price. I still use Liquitex for all my matte/gloss mediums needs, however. I do have some tubes of Liquitex paint from my time at school and that was the only brand they carried and I would run out of a color in class.

Strathmore 500 is my favorite illustration board (I prefer hot press, but it depends on how you paint if hot or cold is better). I also really like using Ampersand's GessoBoard.

My brushes are from all over the place, but I really love Windsor Newton's University Series. I also really like Utrecht's sablette brushes. I do not like real hair brushes in the least. I always use synthetic.

I don't really know how the prices for everything compares. I know what works for me and what I like and what I highly recommend as being worth it to upgrade to if you are looking at something cheaper. It is SO worth it to pay more for the Strathmore over a Crescent board. It will not warp or bubble like Crescent.

I buy my supplies mainly from Utrecht, but also from d**k Blick.
Sera Michaelis's avatar

Fashionable Shopper

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For: Drawing
Material Type: Colored pencil
Brand: Prismacolor (Premier)
Where to purchase it: DickBlick and CarpeDiem have the best selection and prices
Price comparing to other brands: Affordable, but not "cheap," you should not pay more than a dollar per pencil.

Pro: Beautiful, bright and rich colors. Wide selection of colors, all of which match perfectly with markers of the same brand. Smooth and soft cores allow for superior blending and layering on paper of any texture. Pencils have a smaller learning curve compared to wet media and are therefore great tools for professionals or beginners. Lightfast and waterproof.

Con: The softness of the cores means they are prone to breakage, and don't hold a sharp tip as long as harder cores. They are slightly waxy, and thus will create a shiny film on the page after excessive layering and smoothing, preventing further layers.

I hope that wasn't tl;dr. I just really love Prisma. sweatdrop
Queen Pirate Bunny's avatar

Perfect Cutie-Pie

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For the record, I thought about following the format, but then I just didn't.
I'm that a*****e. cool
Hansma
For the record, I thought about following the format, but then I just didn't.
I'm that a*****e. cool
hehe, it's ok. Can you elaborate a little more why you like the brushes and the acrylic paints you mentioned? I'm curious to know what make them better than the average brand out there.
Sera Michaelis
For: Drawing
Material Type: Colored pencil
Brand: Prismacolor (Premier)
Where to purchase it: DickBlick and CarpeDiem have the best selection and prices
Price comparing to other brands: Affordable, but not "cheap," you should not pay more than a dollar per pencil.

Pro: Beautiful, bright and rich colors. Wide selection of colors, all of which match perfectly with markers of the same brand. Smooth and soft cores allow for superior blending and layering on paper of any texture. Pencils have a smaller learning curve compared to wet media and are therefore great tools for professionals or beginners. Lightfast and waterproof.

Con: The softness of the cores means they are prone to breakage, and don't hold a sharp tip as long as harder cores. They are slightly waxy, and thus will create a shiny film on the page after excessive layering and smoothing, preventing further layers.

I hope that wasn't tl;dr. I just really love Prisma. sweatdrop
Great review! Thanks for the input, I've added it to the list. biggrin
Payton Leeroy's avatar

Dangerous Lunatic

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For: Painting
Material type: Oil Paint
Brand: M. Graham
Where to purchase it: Hmm.. I know d**k Blick carries it, but Hobby Lobby doesn't. Beyond that I don't know.
Price comparing to other brands: average
Pro: Walnut oil as a base, so better for the environment
I personally feel that they give a brighter color than other oils I've used.
Clean with Canola oil instead of Turpentine or turpenoid, so a nice money saver there.
Because you're working with more natural oils and cleaners it's healthier for you as well. [Don't eat it though... Still not good for you!]
I feel my brushes last longer since I'm cleaning them with gentler things.
Con: If you're allergic to Walnuts do NOT use this paint. The oil base is walnut oil, so yeah...
They can be very hard to find, though they're starting to grow in popularity.
It's hard to share supplies with other artists unless they use this kind of oil as well. Yes, you can mix the two, but I haven't played around with it enough to really know how it works out long term.


Honestly I've only used these once, so I don't know a whole lot about them. Borrowed them from a friend.
For: painting
Material type: Oil Paint crayons
Brand: *Unknown*
Where to purchase it: *Unknown*
Price comparing to other brands: *Unknown*
Pro: THEY ARE FUN! Whole, whole lot of fun!
Very good way to do emotional works.
Layer easily.
Dry overnight.
Con: Dry overnight.. Even the crayon's exterior. We ended up cutting off the tip every time we wanted to use them again...
Very, very different from traditional painting. Sometimes this can be good, but they take some time to get used to because of this.
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For: Inking, Painting
Material type: India Ink
Brand: Speedball Super Black
Where to purchase it: Widely available
Price comparing to other brands: cheap
Pro: Ink is waterproof upon drying; dries quickly. Deep black pigment doesn't fade with time or lift from erasing. Can be used for drawing with nibs, brushes, or pens. Can also be used for ink painting when diluted with water and used with a brush.
Con: Not alcohol-proof, and may smear with alcohol-based markers unless a fixative is used.
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Great review! Thanks for the input, I've added it to the list. biggrin

No problem, nice idea for a thread btw!
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Hansma
For the record, I thought about following the format, but then I just didn't.
I'm that a*****e. cool
hehe, it's ok. Can you elaborate a little more why you like the brushes and the acrylic paints you mentioned? I'm curious to know what make them better than the average brand out there.
I personally feel that brushes are completely dependent on how you paint. What is perfect for me might be terrible for you. I buy brushes by touched their bristles and knowing what works for my style. I paint in layers and also with graphic lines so I buy the brushes that will do that for me.

Oh, one of the brushes I didn't know exist for a long time was a scriptliner. It has really long bristles and holds a lot of paint for doing line work. It is something everyone should have in their brush arsenal.

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